name this plant - Angelica

Discussion in 'Plant and Tree Identification' started by bonnie lass, Mar 12, 2005.

  1. bonnie lass

    bonnie lass Semper Fi

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    This plant is a member of the carrot family. It is a fragrant, non-woody biennial or short-lived perennial that can reach 9 feet tall. The plant is said to be like a blend of juniper, celery, and asparagus. The young shoots can be added raw to salads. The stem, roots and leaves can be cooked and eaten as a vegetable. The Shakers and Amish would candy the stem. The leaves can be dried and used as a seasoning. The green seeds, which taste of juniper, are used commercially to flavor gin, vermouth, soft drinks, and confections. The name of the European version of this plant dates to the Middle Ages. According to legend, a monk was instructed in a dream to have people chew the root of this plant to protect against the plague. Although the root, stem, and seeds are used medicinally, the fresh root should NOT be eaten, as it may be poisonous. The root yields a latex used as a fixative, and root oil inhibits fungus and bacteria. The root has been approved in Germany as a treatment for anorexia, gas, indigestion, and bloating. It stimulates the secretion of gastric juices and alleviates smooth-muscle spasms. A decoction of the roots or leaves, or tincture of the root, is also used to treat colds, flu, fevers, bronchitis, pleurisy, colic, rheumatism, liver and urinary problems, anemia, and gout. It is reported to create an aversion to alcohol. It is good for hypoglycemia, and should be avoided by diabetics. The crushed leaves are used to reduce motion sickness caused by travel. Fresh or preserved roots have been added to snuff and used by both Native Americans and Laplanders as tobacco.
     
  2. Tater'sPa

    Tater'sPa Well-Known Member

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  3. bonnie lass

    bonnie lass Semper Fi

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    Right again, Tater'sPa. Native species is Angelica Atropurpurea and the European species is Angelica Archangelica, named for the archangel Michael that appeared in that monk's dream. You were the only one to guess, are these too hard?
     
  4. AngieM2

    AngieM2 Big Front Porch advocate Supporter

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    Bonnie
    thanks for doing these.

    I know I don't know this stuff so you are expanding my knowledge base.

    Thanks, Angie
     
  5. Kathy in MD

    Kathy in MD Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Bonnie. please do not stop posting "what plant is it?". I have no idea what most of the answers are but I love learning about them. Thank You..Kathy
     
  6. Tater'sPa

    Tater'sPa Well-Known Member

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    bonnie lass, you're doing a fine job!, keep em coming.
    It was also really nice chat'n with ya yesterday! :)
     
  7. marvella

    marvella Well-Known Member

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    yes, it's fun trying to guess, even if i am wrong. btw, angelica looks a lot like a wild hemlock that can be poisonous. lesson here is- get a good field guide and use it before trying to eat any wild thing.:)
     
  8. bonnie lass

    bonnie lass Semper Fi

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    Thanks guys, I needed a little reassurance :eek: