Name that plant - little diamond shaped green seed pods?

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by Stand_Watie, Sep 4, 2004.

  1. Stand_Watie

    Stand_Watie Well-Known Member

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    (See the photo below)

    These are about 1/2 inch long across the widest spot, and are sticky - they don't feel sticky against your skin, but they cling to fabric. I found them hanging on my shoelace today. They aren't sharp at all like burrs.

    [​IMG]

    Each one has only one seed inside, but they're textured like a green bean and are pretty soft.
     
  2. Ravenlost

    Ravenlost Well-Known Member Supporter

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  3. agmantoo

    agmantoo agmantoo Supporter

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    velcro was designed after studying plants such as the beggar lice
     
  4. Stand_Watie

    Stand_Watie Well-Known Member

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    Wow, you guys are good! I saw some of those flowers yesterday and wondered what they were, now I know what they are and how they spread as well.

    Pretty too.

    I have some sort of legume with similar size and shaped flowers that are a bright gold-yellow all over the property too, anybody know? I should have picked some and scanned them at the same time. Their seed pod looks about like a pea or bean, but only about an inch and a half long. I'll post them up here tomorrow unless somebody already knows offhand. Their leaves are shaped just like honey-locust but my neighbor tells me that that isn't what they are.
     
  5. mary,tx

    mary,tx Well-Known Member Supporter

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    This is not at all like what we call beggar's lice. Now I'm wondering what ours really is!
     
  6. DayBird

    DayBird Big Bird

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    We always called them Hitchhikers. It's an adaptation the plant uses to disperse the seeds.
     
  7. agmantoo

    agmantoo agmantoo Supporter

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    "I have some sort of legume with similar size and shaped flowers that are a bright gold-yellow all over the property too, anybody know? I should have picked some and scanned them at the same time. Their seed pod looks about like a pea or bean, but only about an inch and a half long."


    What you have is sicklepod IMO. You need to try to get rid of it before it takes your place. It is poisonous to some livestock and difficult to get rid of.
    http://texnat.tamu.edu/cmplants/toxic/plants/sicklepod-senna.html
     
  8. Stand_Watie

    Stand_Watie Well-Known Member

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    Now you have me worried enough that I went out with my flashlight and picked one. The pod at the top center of the scan is from a more mature plant of the same type. One of the green pods is down at the bottom sticking up in the middle of the second fork in the plant. All the others are leaves, but they are furled up (I guess they curl up at night).



    [​IMG]
     
  9. Ana Bluebird

    Ana Bluebird Well-Known Member Supporter

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    We always called them "stick-tights", but that just us, I guess.
     
  10. charles

    charles Well-Known Member

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    These are fruit segments of a species of Desmodium.
     
  11. charles

    charles Well-Known Member

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    This is from a species of the genus Cassia. Note that the fruits ("pods") come apart (dehise) along the lenght of the fruit. Desmodium fruits break up into small segments crosswise to the long axis of the fruit.
     
  12. charles

    charles Well-Known Member

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    The species of sicklepod can also be accessed under the genus Sesbania. Note how long the fruits are. Cassia spp. and Desmodium spp. are quite different.