Mystery plant solved!

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by Jodi, Jun 13, 2004.

  1. Jodi

    Jodi Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    47
    Joined:
    May 4, 2004
    Location:
    Indiana
    And the winner is...uncle Will in IN. The plant in my backyard seems to be Holly Hocks. They are just beginning to bloom in vibrant pink. Bummer is...yesterday we got a torrential downpour and bad winds which knocked down most of one plant. I'm going to try and tie it up to the fence today, but the plant is so heavy not sure it's going to work.

    And...what I thought were onions in my backyard....well, I have garlic. And a ton of it! Anyone want some garlic???? We picked some yesterday to put in some potatoes. My mom is staying with me right now and as she was trying to chop them up she informed me...you have garlic here, not onions!


    There actually may be both growing because I swear what I picked a couple weeks ago were onions....but, yesterday what I picked was definitely garlic.

    I didn't know garlic would come back in my area....

    Jodi
     
  2. Paquebot

    Paquebot Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    14,801
    Joined:
    May 9, 2002
    Location:
    South Central Wisconsin
    Indeed, garlic will winter over and multiply deep into Canada. In fact, it will often adapt to a certain climate and become virtually a different variety. A local favorite here is one which was found growing on an old homestead with no clue as to the origins. Garlic is also something which you only have to buy once in a lifetime as there is always something to plant back for the next season. With the numerous topset bulbils, it does not take long for it to do it without any human help.

    Your old single pink hollyhock may be a very old variety. It's the only one which I allow to grow here. It was also the only hollyhock growing on my in-laws homestead and supposedly first planted there in the 1880s, having been carried over from Germany. Thus it's been kept in the family for at least 120 years.

    Martin
     

  3. uncle Will in In.

    uncle Will in In. Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    7,154
    Joined:
    May 11, 2002
    We have three or four colors, but the Japanese beetles love them. Last year they was riddling the rhubarb, but I washed them off with the hose, and they stayed off. Never tried that on other things, but am going to.
    Have any of you seen very many of the gadzillions of brood X cicadas they threatened us with?
     
  4. Jodi

    Jodi Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    47
    Joined:
    May 4, 2004
    Location:
    Indiana
    To be honest, I'm not sure what a ciccada looks like. Could someone describe one please? I haven't noticed any unusual bugs outside as of late. And so far, haven't been hit with too many of those pesky orange beetles. Are those the Japanese beetles? I know the people we bought this house from had problems last year in the attics. Theres oodles of dead ones up there, but so far this year have not seen very many at all.




    Jodi
     
  5. suelandress

    suelandress Windy Island Acres Supporter

    Messages:
    4,588
    Joined:
    May 10, 2002
    Location:
    The Quiet Corner of CT
    The "pesky" orang bettles we have are lady bugs. First year we moved here, they swarmed like love bugs in the south do. Last year they were here only by the hundreds :rolleyes: Seriously considering capturing and selling the buggers!!
     
  6. uncle Will in In.

    uncle Will in In. Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    7,154
    Joined:
    May 11, 2002
    I think you are referring to the lovely stinking lady bugs that move into your house in the fall. They look like a tiny beige turtle with poka dots. Did I mention they STINK. The Japanese beetles are bigger and show up in the middle of the summer as hungry as a bear. They are dark colored with bright pycodelic colors on their back. They love sweet rotten things like over the hill rose blooms. We had two large Chinese Elms which they would strip completely bare every summer. The beetles are gone within a month or so, and the trees would get all new leaves.
    They seem to have two goals in life. Those are eat and breed.
    When you see one eating, most often there will be one on top of it breeding. They make good use of their short life here.
    You might find a cicada's empty shell sticking to the bark of a tree. It is dark colored with one end pointed like an acorn and the other end kinda square. They are about a half inch wide and three quarters of an inch long, and hollow.