Myotonia in DOGS?

Discussion in 'Goats' started by Little Quacker in OR, Jun 25, 2006.

  1. Little Quacker in OR

    Little Quacker in OR Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,126
    Joined:
    May 9, 2002
    Location:
    Oregon
    Hi everyone. Having problems getting and staying on the web so I'll try and be brief. I would like to know if any of you have experienced "Myotonia" (muscle stiffness disease) in your
    Australian Cattle Dogs! I understand it is also found in other breeds but don't know how widespread it is. There is a blood test for this syndrome in ACD's now. There has been one for Miniature Schnauzers for awhile but we are told that the mutation inheritance in that breed is different so although there is a blood test for it, this Miniature Schnauzer test does
    not detect the Australian Cattle Dog mutation. Heavily muscled dogs who become stiff after exercise and may become stiff legged and maybe even topple over would be suspects for this syndrome. I can see that this problem could be diagnosed as epilepsy or even a back injury or spinal weakness.

    Previously I had only heard of this syndrome in Tennesse Fainting Goats. Had NO idea it was found in canines and in Cattle Dogs! Also, the only cases I have heard about are from Canada, so you nice people up north, if you would check this out that would be great!

    The Ontario Veterinary College at the University of Guelph in Ontario have been investigating this syndrome in a Cattle Dog from Central Ontario. I gather but do not know for sure that it is recessive? IF so, that would mean that only one gene from each parent would have to be transmitted to the pups for them to have it too. And of course this also means that an individual can carry the gene and not show any signs. OY VEY!

    To me, as I do not have Fainting Goats, the symptoms do sound the same in both species. I hope some of you with these cute goats will chime in here, thus the reason for posting this on three forums, the Pet Forum, Goat Forum and the Homesteading Forum. As far as I know the typical signs are the stiffness in the muscles when excitement is felt and then they sieze up and sometimes the animal falls over. Then, they slowly relax and seem fine..

    The Guelph researchers have developed a rapid blood test for the Australian
    Cattle Dog mutation that can accurately detect both affected and carrier
    animals. I understand that the test will be available shortly from the Animal Health Laboratory
    at the University of Guelph. Instructions for blood collection and submission,
    and testing fees, will be available on the website of the Animal Health
    Laboratory, Guelph (see below) in the near future.

    For more information please contact:

    Prof. Brad Hanna, DVM, PhD
    Department of Biomedical Sciences
    Ontario Veterinary College
    University of Guelph
    Guelph, Ontario, N1G 2W1 Canada
    Tel: 519-824-4120 x54534
    FAX: 519-767-1450
    bhanna@uoguelph.ca
    <http://us.f310.mail.yahoo.com/ym/Compose?To=bhanna@uoguelph.ca&YY=57975&y5beta=yes&y5beta=yes&order=down&sort=date&pos=0>

    Animal Health Laboratory
    University of Guelph
    Bldg. 49, McIntosh Lane
    Guelph Ontario N1G 2W1
    Fax: 519-821-8072
    Telephone: 519-824-4120 ext 54502
    E-mail: info@ahl.uoguelph.ca
    <http://us.f310.mail.yahoo.com/ym/Compose?To=info@ahl.uoguelph.ca&YY=57975&y5beta=yes&y5beta=yes&order=down&sort=date&pos=0>
    Web-site: www.ahl.uoguelph.ca

    thanks and I hope this gets around!!! LQ
     
  2. computerchick

    computerchick Keeper of the Zoo

    Messages:
    277
    Joined:
    Jun 24, 2005
    Yep, even happens in humans. Used to have a family that had cats with it when I worked for a vet years ago.

    Probably NOT a perk for dogs.

    Andrea
     

  3. Little Quacker in OR

    Little Quacker in OR Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,126
    Joined:
    May 9, 2002
    Location:
    Oregon
    I had no idea it happened it humans and cats! Amazing!

    Thanks for the info!

    LQ