My swarm management plan

Discussion in 'Beekeeping' started by justgojumpit, Oct 22, 2004.

  1. justgojumpit

    justgojumpit Well-Known Member

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    May 5, 2003
    Location:
    North Salem, NY
    this spring, if all hives overinter, i will have three lang hives (my tb hive is being transferred to a lang tomorrow!) that will need swarming control. my plan is to make one split from each hive in may, once the fruit blossom is over, sooner if swarming seems to be imminent. once eggs are found in the splits (1 frame honey, 1 capped brood, 1 eggs and very young brood) i will kill the queens in my original hives and intoduce the queens from these splits in push-in cages http://www.honeyflowfarm.com/beeproject/images/puchincagelarge.jpg on frames of capped brood from the original hive. all three nucs will now be queenless, with eggs. the nucs will be combined the next day using the newspaper method and allowed to raise another new queen. after four days the queens in the original hives will be released. the stack of nuc hives will be transferred into a regular lang hive when eggs are once again found. this will give me one new hive, and all new queens. the reason for the new queens is that hives with queens over a year old are more likely to swarm. this method of requeening the original hives will not interrupt brood rearing for more than a few days, and taking the splits will keep the original hives from becoming overcrowded.

    this plan will be combined with reversing the supers, etc.

    what do you think, will it work? will the nucs be able to withstand going through a second queen rearing, or would i be better off to make four splits from the three hives and use one of these splits to raise a queen for the new hive which is going to be a combination of all splits?

    justgojumpit
     
  2. justgojumpit

    justgojumpit Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    428
    Joined:
    May 5, 2003
    Location:
    North Salem, NY
    duhhhh, why don't I just keep the splits separate? I could watch my splits until queen cells are capped, then kill the queen in the original colony, wait a day, and swap a frame of capped brood from the parent colony with a frame of capped brood and queen cells from the daughter colony. Then both the parent and daughter hive would have capped queen cells, which would hatch into queens, which would mate and then lay eggs soon after with lessened brood rearing interruptions in the parent hive and more hives produced. DUH! It seems that intricacy is not always the best way of doing things ;)

    justgojumpit
     

  3. rainesridgefarm

    rainesridgefarm Well-Known Member

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    Dec 1, 2002
    Location:
    Davis IL
    The old timers used to just go into each hive that has 8 frames of brood and eggs and kill the queen. Do one hive a day like that and they all should raise a new queen. You stagger the mating process and you slow the growth down but have a new young queen going into the honey flow. You will need to do this at the beginning of the dandalion bloom and make sure you have feeders on all the hives, The hives that do not build queen cells can be given one of the extras from the ones that do. I have done this and it works well with strong hives.