My Stupid,Brillant Idea

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by Robert F, Dec 30, 2005.

  1. Robert F

    Robert F Member

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    I'm not sure were to post this here or shop talk please move if its in the wrong place.
    I need a bigger workshop mine's 10x16 now i would like at least 16x24 with a 4x16 lumber storage bump out on one end lumber storage is my bigest trouble.

    So here's my idea my mailbox is made out of 4" thin wall pvc pipe filled with concrete and rebar. The mail box post has been up for 14 years no signs of cracks or deteration.

    Why can't i dig a hole 3' deep pour a 12" footer put the pipe on top of the footer with rebar sticking up run rebar all the way thru to the top to a 4" bracket fill with concete and put J bolts every 4' sticking out one side of the pipe to bolt 2x4 purlins on for closing in the walls.

    The pipe/post will only support the roof a 4/12 or 6/12 pitch no snow load down here and frost is 6" i would put pipe 8'oc. on the outside wall clear floorspace a slab or brick on sandbed floor.

    Stupid,Brillant what do y'all thank?

    robert
     
  2. Jim-mi

    Jim-mi Well-Known Member

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    pvc+rebar+ readymix + j bars = $

    4 x 4 = $

    Have you priced all those items lately ?
    Yes you could make it work ... just fine.
    I'd love to be watching an "inspector" as you explained your home made bearing coloums..............lol

    6" frost.........you must be wayyyyyyyy south....
     

  3. Cyngbaeld

    Cyngbaeld In Remembrance Supporter

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    I think I would either want rebar all the way thru the column or just get some PT posts and bolt to your footer. The problem with concrete is that while it is strong in compression, it is weak in tension. So it doesn't flex well with the wind. Not a problem if it is stout (thick) enough, but a column that is too slender with the wall working as a wind catcher could fracture under high wind conditions.
     
  4. Linda H

    Linda H Missouri Ozarks

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    I think a traditional pole barn would be much cheaper to build and much sturdier. To build a 24x32 you would need 12 4x6's. (Some people use 4x4's) Lowes has pressure treated 4x4's for about 8 dollars each right now.

    Linda
     
  5. gobug

    gobug Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I think Cyngbaeld is correct on the wind making too much tension for your skinny posts. You could do as you suggest plus wrap the post in chicken wire, fix it to the post with screws and spacers, then parge on cement to the outside. Ferrocement combines the compressive strength of concrete with the tensile strength of steel for a combination stronger than either. I'm no fan of chicken wire, but it has been used to make ferrocement for ages. An extra inch of thickness of ferrocement would make a pretty stout column.

    I'm not sure I understand your 3 foot deep hole with a 12 inch footer. Are you saying you would dig a trench three foot deep, or just post holes? Would the footer run at grade level connecting the post holes? If so, this sounds pretty solid and Cyngbaeld's other suggestion to run the rebar to the bottom seems necessary.

    I think Linda's suggestion is good, but you can't make a pole barn with 8 foot poles, so the price is wrong. We have the same price here in CO HD on the 4x4 8 foot treated poles. While the pole barns don't have a footer, you have to bury the posts. 12 foot posts are not cheap.

    Do you need a permit? 10x16 is small enough here to get away with it. 240 sq ft is the cutoff. Perhaps if the addition is outside lumber storage it would satisfy the inspector. Unless you're certain, it's better to ask.
     
  6. Jim-mi

    Jim-mi Well-Known Member

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    Still ya got me a thinkin. 6" pvc- rebar- concrete would make a darn hefty vertical to support the rail/trolley/chainfall.......

    Na...overkill ... a couple 4x6's ... and easier to handle