My new goat must be really old

Discussion in 'Goats' started by Lizi, Sep 21, 2006.

  1. Lizi

    Lizi Active Member

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    Yup, my new goat must be OLD, I got her for a trade so I cannot complain. I see that she only has three teeth on the bottom in front, and one of them juts out forward. She is Alpine and has a beard about 6-7" long, she is very sweet. Evidently the teeth in back that I cannot see are just fine, she grinds up hay and carrots very well. Can anyone estimate her age for me and...I hate to say it, but if these front three fall out, can she live a normal life just with back teeth? I will cook her special foods if that is what she needs, I just need to know what to expect in the future. Thanks. Lizi and Taffy
     
  2. KSALguy

    KSALguy Lost in the Wiregrass Supporter

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    count over from the center, each year up to four or five (cant remimber which) they will get a new pair so you can count over from the center to number the pairs to see how old she could be, after that they are a solid mouth for a few years and then they start loosing teath, if she is loosing teath she is at least 8 or older its hard to tell after the solid mouth period because there is no way to tell how many years they stay solid.

    as long as she has some teath in the front she can keep browsing, once they are gone she can probably still eat just not tough brows, she would be limmited to what you can feed her.

    as long as she is in good condition you have a good goat
     

  3. Al. Countryboy

    Al. Countryboy Well-Known Member

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    I agree with what KSALguy said concerning a goats age. We bought an old doe and later noticed that she had losts most of her front teeth. She was bred, but was not able to eat properly and was always having problems with bloat. We was able to keep her alive for about a year and she did deliver a very nice buck kid that we used acouple of years in our breeding program. I hope you have better luck with your old girl. Ours was such a sweet old girl and still have one of her grand daughters.
     
  4. Lizi

    Lizi Active Member

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    Well, there are just three really long teeth on the bottom, so I am figuring she is over 8. She is in a dry lot, some grass to nibble, so I think she will do OK. Her overall health is excellent (except the tooth issue) so I think she will last a few more years. If attitude will help her live longer, then she will go on forever! Thanks to all. Lizi and Taffy
     
  5. billygoatridge

    billygoatridge Well-Known Member

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    This is where alfalfa pellets definitely helps. We had an older doe that wasn't keeping weight on despite worming. One day I was abserving her and notices she was just picking leaves of the hay( even worse than goats usually do) one at a time. Sure enough her teeth were wore down with a couple missing. I started giving her a couple pounds of alfalfa pellets a day (working up gradually) and she started putting weight on. Since she could gobble it instead of chew it helped.