My flowers won't grow!

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by tngirl, Jan 31, 2005.

  1. tngirl

    tngirl Well-Known Member

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    Help me, please. Every year I spend a nice chunk of change on beautiful flower seeds. I plant them, tend to them, and I haven't seen one grow yet! What am I doing wrong? I follow the directions on the package. I don't have this problem when planting the vegetable garden, so why are my flowers so funny?
    -Danielle
     
  2. bonnie lass

    bonnie lass Semper Fi

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    This is an interesting question. Do you start them inside or direct sow? What exactly are you planting? Some seeds need to be exposed to cold before they will germinate.
     

  3. Mutti

    Mutti Well-Known Member Supporter

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    It depends on what type flowers you are trying to grow. One thing I have found that helps in the garden is to make your row,water the ROW and then plant the flowers lightly on top of the really damp soil,then cover and be sure to firm the soil over them...we just step lightly down the row. Then be sure and mark where that row is! That way you aren't washing the seeds away and driving them too deep to germinate by the pressure of the water. Some seeds require light to germinate, tiny seeds like petunias can be bought pelleted which really helps. If we knew what type of flowers you wanted to grow I'm sure someone could pinpoint our problems. DEE
     
  4. tngirl

    tngirl Well-Known Member

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    I've tried poppies (several times), bluebonnets, daisies, violas, marigolds, and morning glories. The marigolds and morning glories, however, did grow. I check the back of the packet and make sure I only pick flowers for my zone area. I've tried several different species (?) of the poppies and daisies as well. I plant them in the soil, usually the packet says to sprinkle them lightly and cover them with a thin layer of the soil. The poppies especially say that on the back.
     
  5. bonnie lass

    bonnie lass Semper Fi

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    Well, you got the morning glories and marigolds, thats a start :D I have not grown bluebonnets myself. Violets (true violets, not pansies) prefer shade. I started some poppy seeds inside 2 weeks ago, and the germination was incredible, close to 100%, but I did not cover the seeds with dirt. I believe they need light to germinate. I also grow shasta daisies. I have not started those inside, but they reseed and spread in the yard easily. Would you perhaps like some seed? These poppies are enormous. They are breadseed type, and the seedpod is as big as a baseball :eek:
     
  6. tngirl

    tngirl Well-Known Member

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    I love the little faces you chose! :) LOL. I'd love some seeds and thanks for the help. I did start my poppies inside several times and they did great. But, once I put them outside, there was a problem. The soil we had for the flower bed was terrific, all composted manure and leaves. That's why I can't figure out the problem. But, come to think about it, I don't think i ever let them germinate in direct sunlight like the window. Those darn cats are so mischievous that they kept knocking over my planter. So, I put them on top of the tv cabinet.
     
  7. vicki in NW OH

    vicki in NW OH Well-Known Member

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    Danielle,

    What kind of poppies are you trying to grow? Shirley poppies, or some folks call them "corn" poppies, do not like to be transplanted. In fact, they do well by just distributing the seed on top of the soil in the autumn. Early in the spring is good, too. Dampen the soil and distribute the seed as evenly as possible and just press in a little. Not too deep. They germinate better by having cold temps. and then warming a little during the day. They'll spit out so many seeds when they are done blooming that they'll become as numerous as weeds. They are beautiful with larkspur. Larkspur needs the same growing conditions.

    I start violas in the house (probably in Feb. some time). They need darkness to germinate. The seed needs to be just covered, not too deep. Put a piece of cardboard over the top of the container for darkness. Provide some bottom heat, and when you see the plants start to sprout, take the cardboard off and provide light.