My First Kiko!

Discussion in 'Goats' started by JAS, Apr 4, 2006.

  1. JAS

    JAS Well-Known Member

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    I am getting my first Kiko crossed buckling, 50/50 Boer/Kiko, towards the end of May. I am so excited to see what everyone is talking about. He looks like a Boer, which is what I want.

    Can anyone here tell me their experiences with Kikos, good/bad. I will be using this guy in October on half my does.
     
  2. JAS

    JAS Well-Known Member

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    I did a search and realize there is not much about Kikos here. I thought I would post some pictures.
    This is the sire, I think he is 2-3 years old but not for sure:

    [​IMG]

    Here is the mother and the her twins, I am getting the dark-headed one! They are only one month old in this picture.

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    Here is a close up of my boy!

    [​IMG]
     

  3. Paula

    Paula Well-Known Member

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    A friend just gave us a 3/4 Kiko 1/4 Boer buck.
    We had a herd of Boer goats for a few years but finally got disgusted and got rid of them. Boers are very susceptable (sp?) to worms, have foot probs, and at birth their babies tend to just loll around on the ground and freeze to death if it's really cold.
    There are a few people who raise










    k
     
  4. TexCountryWoman

    TexCountryWoman Gig'em

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    Very cool! No, there is not much out there on Kikos. I have searched myself. Isn't the cross between a Boer and a Kiko known as a Genemaster? Or is that just what one particular breeder calls it? Keep us posted on this new goat of yours.
     
  5. TexCountryWoman

    TexCountryWoman Gig'em

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  6. Paula

    Paula Well-Known Member

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    A friend just gave us a 3/4 Kiko 1/4 Boer buck.
    We had a herd of Boer goats for a few years but finally got disgusted and got rid of them. Boers are very susceptable (sp?) to worms, have foot probs, and at birth their kids tend to just loll around on the ground and freeze to death if it's really cold. You really have to coddle them for them to do well. I made the decision that they had to go while warming up the umpteenth half frozen baby in my kitchen sink the last winter we had them. Dh had long since had his fill of them.
    There are a few people who raise Kikos around here. They all had the same problems we did with the Boers. They all love the Kikos. They say they need much less worming, much less hoof trimming and the babies are much more hardy. One lady said the kids are born kicking and jump up almost the minute they hit the ground.
    I guess since we were given the buck we'll give it a go again. Dh is buying 2 boer/spanish cross does on Sat. to keep him company. There's a lady here who has a big herd of registered kikos, we plan to talk to her about getting a couple of young does.
    I had heard that the kiko bucks can be aggressive. This one has been here for almost 3 weeks and has been no problem at all so far.
     
  7. Goat Freak

    Goat Freak Slave To Many Animals

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    CONGRATS on getting a new goat JAS! Good Luck with him! Bye.
     
  8. JAS

    JAS Well-Known Member

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    A Genemaster is a 3/8 Kiko:5/8 Boer which is a F3 generation.
    Here is an article about it:

    http://www.kikogoats.com/genemast1.htm

    A 50/50 Boer x Kiko is considered a Boki.

    I do believe the bucks are suppose to be more aggressive than a Boer, not sure how it compairs to other breeds though.

    The Kiko was bred in New Zealand from ferral goats that where bred first to Angora bucks in the wild and then selectively to large dairy bucks (Anglo-Nubian, Toggenburg and Saanen). They were culled very selectively for hardiness and growth rate.

    Paula, they gave you one! Lucky you. The lady I am buying this buck from, bought her herd sires for $750 and $800! She says the offspring have been selling good. She had registered 50% Kiko doelings for $275. Wish I could afford a few....