My dog caught a jack rabbit - what

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by Wolf mom, Mar 23, 2005.

  1. Wolf mom

    Wolf mom Well-Known Member

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    can I do with it other than put it in the burn barrel. I'm sort'a new at this. Do I just let them eat it? Should I skin, clean & cook it for them? HOW It's in a bag in my refrig. Boy, is my Hon going to be amazed when he comes home. :rolleyes: :eek: :rolleyes:
     
  2. second_noah

    second_noah Local Yokel

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    Well at the risk of parasites, I'd just give it to em...if they killed it, they can eat it like that. I wouldn't be cookin a gormet meal for my pooches personally...OR you could bury it or burn it or I dunno?? The pelt might be nice to have to keepsakes.
     

  3. JoyKelley

    JoyKelley Well-Known Member

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    I think it has alot to do if you want them to catch more. If you let them eat it , they will more likely want to do it again and again and again.
     
  4. katlupe

    katlupe Off-The-Grid Homesteader Supporter

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    My dog's favorite food is rabbit. We let her eat them raw. It does keep them out of our garden. Where we live, she's not going to run into any tame ones.
     
  5. Cyngbaeld

    Cyngbaeld In Remembrance Supporter

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    I think it will take a lot more than a scolding to stop a dog from chasing rabbits. The only thing I would really be concerned about is Tularemia, rabbit fever. You can catch it from the rabbit blood. The son of a friend of mine had it and was very ill for nearly a year.
     
  6. moonwolf

    moonwolf Well-Known Member

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    My terrier caught and killed a bird the other day. I burned it in the trash.
    He has caught and killed in the past a skunk, a red squirrel, voles, mice that were burned. He tangled with a big woodchuck that gave him a visous bite. I helped him dispense with that one and fed the bear in the woods with it.
     
  7. Tracy Rimmer

    Tracy Rimmer CF, Classroom & Books Mod Supporter

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    Either way, I don't think I'd want an unskinned wild rabbit in my fridge. I'd give it to them and let them have at it.

    Tracy
     
  8. MikeD

    MikeD Well-Known Member

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    Parasites, disease, viral infection, unknown dietary intake (potentially contaminated food/water sources, etc) , genetically flawed (cancer, etc).....

    Then again, it could be perfectly healthy. The biggest question - How much do you care about your dog?
     
  9. Thumper/inOkla.

    Thumper/inOkla. Well-Known Member

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    My dogs eat rabbit, any rabbit they can get, they will stand infront of the cages drooling and the rabbits will come up and smell them, and the dog gives the rabbit a kiss on the nose, my dogs respect the cages and are punished of they jump on a cage, or bark at a caged animal. But any loose rabbit is fair game, we call any small furry thing they are allowed to eat a "mouse" things they are not to eat are called a "baby" I refer to our caged rabbits as "No, thats a baby" in front of the dogs, On the rare occations a rabbit escapes from it's cage and the dog is near, I can call them off if I see it soon enough. We have not lost any tame escaped rabbits to the dogs yet, but sooner or later I won't see it soon enough. I like for my dogs eat the wild rabbits to provide a higher level of control for them, (they can get as bad as rats) and it may help reduce the chance that contact between one of my loose tame rabbit and a diseased wild one would occur or that ticks and fleas from a wild one would become a health issue for us.

    I don't think how much you love or value your dog is an issue, my dogs are not pampered pets they are working dogs that help run my farm.
     
  10. Wolf mom

    Wolf mom Well-Known Member

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    Thnanks everyone for your experience and thoughtful replys. The rabit ended up in the burn barrel for a couple of reasons. As much as I'd have liked to skin, etc. it as I've never done that before (except with a snake) I don't have time right now. The second reason was that the dogs started to fight - not a squabble, but down and dirty. My daughter's city dog is with us for a week, and I didn't want him going home looking like a train wreck.
     
  11. VALENT

    VALENT Well-Known Member

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    Wolf mom, you did right. If he catches another one, let him decide(the dog). But dont let the rabbit lay around for long. They do carry disease (as mentioned above).
     
  12. Jenn

    Jenn Well-Known Member Supporter

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    everything dead we're not gonna eat (I would let my dogs eat it- gave them squirrel they caught after we'd skinned it) goes in compost. A dead ram under a few p-utruckloads of wood chips, rebury every few days after buzzards have been digging. turkey/chicken just under dirt in dogproof area in/near comp heap.
     
  13. RedneckPete

    RedneckPete Well-Known Member

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    My dog eats rabbits all the time. Coons, possums, squirrels, rabbits, birds and mice round out the diet. She is very good at catching mice, not sure how she does it.

    Your dog was BUILT to eat rabbits. My dog will leave a full bowl of Iams kibbles and chew on a half eaten frozen rabbit. The ONLY concern is parasites, with is easily cured with a semi regular dewormer.

    For more info

    http://www.michigan.gov/dnr/1,1607,7-153-10370_12150_12220-26630--,00.html

    Pete