My 2005 garden homepage!

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by Buckrun, Jul 26, 2005.

  1. Buckrun

    Buckrun Well-Known Member

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    I built a small page with pictures of my 2005 garden. I am entered in the GIANT PUMPKIN CONTEST here on Homesteading Today! I have 3 or 4 that look pretty good. They are not record breakers but may beat my best! :clap:

    Lets see some more garden pictures. Show off all your hard work. :happy:

    :goodjob: CLICK HERE--My 2005 garden. --CLICK HERE! :goodjob:

    My garden measures 75' x 90'
    I have onyons, horseradish, swiss chard, lettus, collards, mustard, patato's, 4 types of beans, cucumbers, okra, zuchini, buttercup and winter squash, goards, muskmellon, watermellon, pumpkin, carrots and tomatoes. Sorry about my spelling I am sure I didn't get some of those correct. :stars:
    I love my gardening. I am going to till up another large plot for strawberrys. I also want to start growing some of the things I need for canning. Like dill, mustard seed and garlic. I am sure there are some more I can grow to save $$ on my canning.
    Steve
     
  2. Kazahleenah

    Kazahleenah Disgruntled citizen

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    Very nice garden. What kinds of 'maters did you plant?

    Kaza
     

  3. sylvar

    sylvar Well-Known Member

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    Looks great! You have to tell me though, How have you managed to keep the weeds out of your vines? I have an awful time keeping the weeds out og my squash melons and cukes.

    Thanks!

    Shane
     
  4. Buckrun

    Buckrun Well-Known Member

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    Rutkers, Marglobe, Amish salad, Golden Nugget, Roma and another kind. This was the first time I have started my tomatoes from seed. :goodjob: The only plants I bought were some Hobenyero :flame: peppers (SP?) :( I think I forgot to put peppers on my list. There are several types of peppers also.
    Steve
     
  5. Barb

    Barb Well-Known Member

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    Very nice Buckrun!

    Makes me want to move. Between drought, blight, wind and hail. I may get nothing this year.
     
  6. Buckrun

    Buckrun Well-Known Member

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    Step carefully and pull pull pull. Last year I didn't do as well and where I had my vine crops and corn were terrable with weeds this year. :grump:

    I always have a hoe in my hand when I am walking around. A hint I sharpen my hoe with a file every time I pick it up out of the barn. Dull as a hoe doesn't work in my garden. I have to be careful mine will cut you quick. But it will cut a weed off or just glide under the soil easy. Try it it cuts the work down a lot.

    I hold the handle in my left hand. Rest the hoe on my thigh and sharpen (put the bevel edge on the side that will be on the top side as you are cutting weeds off. Be careful you could cut you fingers that are holding the file while doing this. So far I haven't cut myself. But I can see it happening so I am careful. :nono:
    Steve
     
  7. BearCreekFarm

    BearCreekFarm Well-Known Member

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    Minnesota
    Buckrun, thanks for sharing your garden photos. You have a beautiful garden.
    We started our first garden together this year- DH cleared a 2-3 acre alfalfa field which had been in hay for 15 years. We used the square foot method, and mulched heavily with rabbit bedding- we have hardly had to pull any weeds- when we do see them we just pull them by hand.

    We only got a fraction of our area planted this season, but we are making up more beds now for fall planting and next spring all of this year's beds will be ready to plant in, so that will save time and work. We keep saying "NEXT year we'll have a great garden", lol.

    Nice to enjoy the "fruits" of someone else's labor. Good luck with the pumpkins.
     
  8. vickinell

    vickinell Well-Known Member

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    Very inspiring. Keep up the good work and thanks for sharing.
     
  9. gardentalk

    gardentalk Well-Known Member

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    I'm falling in love with the Square Foot Gardening method (as if no one here already knows that, LOL!), and that alone would at least 90-95% rid you of your weed problem. Another thing you could do next year (which I'm going to try doing, and I know it will work, just not sure of the cost) is this:

    Build a large box, say 10'x10' with either a rock-filled bottom or a bottom made out of wood. That would be enough space to let your plant(s) grow freely (as long as they were toward the middle of the box). Inside of that box build 12"x12" boxes with bottoms built in the same fashion) filled with Mel's Mix (1 part Vermiculite/Perlite, 1 part Compost/Humus, 1 part Cow Manure). When you water your plants, just water inside the box, and fertilize with cow manure perhaps once per month (or week if you find that you are washing the soil away from the plant roots too much). I'm willing to bet there will be a 90-95% harvest or better. If you have problems with Japanese Bettles, just plant a marigold plant in each corner of your outer box, voila! :lonergr:
     
  10. gardentalk

    gardentalk Well-Known Member

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    I find that if you just water your plants, and wait long enough for the soil to be "walkable" (if you're using the Square Foot Gardening method, weeding is never an issue), you can pull almost any type of weed up roots-and-all without ever needing to use a hoe. Might be easier for you. :cowboy:
     
  11. sylvar

    sylvar Well-Known Member

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    I use some SFG principles in my garden....but I don't find that it works as well when you are working on volume. Mel's mix is'nt exactly cheap. I prefer the Dick Raymond's Wide row method/natural rotation. My family can easily eat a 10' X 3' wide row of Spinach. Filling that bed alone would have cost me $75...(I know this because I almost filled that bed with Mel's mix this year...couldn't justify the cost).

    I do a lot of newspaper covers by straw, and that works great....but I can't convince the melons to stay in that bed! So I end up trying to pull weeds in among the vines.

    Shane
     
  12. Nan

    Nan Well-Known Member

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    Gorgeous garden Buckrun!!! Doesn't look like you need much advice on raising a beeeeautiful garden! :clap: Thanks so much for sharing your pictures!!! Nothing prettier than a bunch of healthy veggie plants! Oh...I love those cattle panels too! I use them horizontally for my tomatoes, cucs, and peas! Your arch looks great!!! Blessings on your pumpkin entry! Even if you weren't to win you get a pie out of the deal! Can't beat that with a stick, huh?!!!! :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap:
     
  13. gardentalk

    gardentalk Well-Known Member

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    I'm considering building a bed (sorry, a "Mel Method", LOL!) next year and filling it with one-square-foot blocks that are sown, and the rest of the bed with gravel. That way, there are very few weeds to pull, you can more easily walk amongst the vines, and watering would be more confined to the plants you're trying to grow. ;)
     
  14. gardentalk

    gardentalk Well-Known Member

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    I agree, Mel's Mix IS expensive. What I'm wondering is if you buy in bulk, if it might be cheaper that way. At Southern States, I believe 4 cu. ft. of cow manure was about $1.50, and 4 cu. ft. of humus was similarly priced. The bulk of my cost in building and filling the beds was the vermiculite (well, I had to buy Perlite, seems to work just fine) and the wood (didn't know I could go to construction work sites and ask if I can take some of their wood) and brackets (don't know where else to look for corner brackets than the expensive ones at Lowes). The costs of building the grids will pay for itself, I think, since I will be able to use those grids for a number of years. If someone can recommend a better mix (in cost, effectiveness and safety) than:

    1 part humus
    1 part cow manure
    1 part vermiculite,

    I will give it a definite shot. :p
     
  15. sylvar

    sylvar Well-Known Member

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    Its even more expensive now that he recommends 1 part compost, 1 part peat moss and 1 part vermiculite.

    I wanted to do just one of my beds in that mix and here was the breakout:

    4' X 20' Bed 8" deep = 60 cubic feet

    1 cubic yard of compost = $26
    4 cubic feet of Coarse Vermiculite = $11 X 5 = $55
    3 cubic feet peatmoss = $7.50 X 6 (I should use 7 but I figured a little extra compost wouldn't hurt) = $45

    That's $126 for one bed. I couldn't justify the cost.

    I think the humus instead of the peat (like you are using) makes a better mix anyway, But thats not cheap either.

    Shane
     
  16. Nan

    Nan Well-Known Member

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    Why don't ya'll use compost? If you don't have much room an old trash can with holes in it will work and keep the mess down. I know that I got a whole truck load of horse poo straw for free. It came from a horse boarding place near our house. It takes a bit of work, but it is great for the garden! I can't imagine buying dirt??? Call some of the horse stables around??? Even if you had to pay something for it, it would be cheaper than the bagged and you would get more for your money! Find a friend with rabbits or chickens? What about all of those lovely bags of leaves that you see in the fall just for the picking??? I embarrassed my teenaged kids when I asked if I could have the 13 bags of leaves that a fellow had raked up and bagged. I kept them in their bags over the winter and the next spring they were gorgeous black compost. It would work just to dump them onto your raised beds too. Lotsa free stuff around if you ask. You could even volunteer to clean out someones barn for the poo. I haven't had to go that far.....but if you want to save money it is a possibility too. I have enough little poo critters now that I don't have to haul any unless I get a great deal like the horse poo again! It was this gorgeous dark composted at least a year mound of horse manure and composted straw. Just couldn't pass that up!
     
  17. jesducky

    jesducky Well-Known Member

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    hey buckrun, glad to see that the Lima area isn't suffering from the drought that's hitting parts of Shelby and Miami Counties. I'm in Montgomery. :) Your garden is gorgeous! Thanks for sharing.

    I started out as the traditional gardener (rows) because that's how my grandparents gardened for years (all over the world--everywhere they went they had awesome vegetable and flower gardens), then evolved over to Mel's SFG method, but are now moving to a blend of the SFG and WIDE row gardening. I am seeing healthier and stronger plants with more fruit (other than the beans that the bean beetles decimated :mad: ) by blending the two methods.

    A lot of stables around here will let you take horse manure away for free if you just shovel it up out of the stall.

    I don't know what I'd do without a compost pile; it's black gold to me. :bow: :bow:
     
  18. Buckrun

    Buckrun Well-Known Member

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    It was pretty dry for a while. But I will take the drought over a wet year anytime. I have water sprinklers set up.

    I have tried wide rows and they work great. But I had a problem with mice getting in there and eating my crops. They are a big problem in my beets.

    If I am going to clean out the stalls some one is going to have to pay me! Then let me have the poo. I had my fill of cleaning horse stalls when I was a kid. :eek: Try the county fair barns. Our fair grounds has large piles of the stuff and will use a front loader to load you up. Just let them know when you will be there. I found out a friend of mine has a dump truck and said I could borrow it. I may have to set up a day to haul a few loads home. :happy:

    Steve
     
  19. jesducky

    jesducky Well-Known Member

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    "I have tried wide rows and they work great. But I had a problem with mice getting in there and eating my crops. They are a big problem in my beets."

    I've fought all kinds of beasties, but never mice. How did you figure out they were the culprits? I'm living in a less-developed area and it would be helpful to know their modus operandi. I do have many chipmunk holes and they have caused a bit of a problem by undermining some of the plant root systems. Luckily, the farm cat keeps their population down!
     
  20. Buckrun

    Buckrun Well-Known Member

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    They were either mice or shrews. I would see them darting around trying to escape form my activitys in the garden. They would go from beet to beet taking a few bites out of each. Then they would eat one so when you pulled it it was just a shell.

    The muskmellons would just about be ripe then it would collaps. I'd look at it and there would be a hole about the size of a quarter somewhere around the stem. :grit:

    I always have a burn pile of limbs and stuff behind the garden. This is where they live. Every time I burn it I vow to not have it again. But limbs fall out of the trees and I have to have somewhere to pile them. :bash: It is to close to the garden to burn while the garden grows.

    Steve