musky doe

Discussion in 'Goats' started by doralee, Oct 27, 2004.

  1. doralee

    doralee Member

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    I have a Lamancha{sp} milking doe,This is her 3rd freshening, The twins are gone. and her milk is very goaty. Very creamy, but has a musky, billy, after taste. Does anyone have a remidy. I have tried several things nothing is working. I thought that she was influenced by my buck, so he is no longer a buck. The flavor is not going away. I am hoping that this is not just a goaty milker. I have only had her for 3 months. Maybe I didnt notice the flavor until now and she has always had it. Any suggestions?!
     
  2. Stacy Adams

    Stacy Adams Well-Known Member

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    First off, what I would do is bring a clean cup to the barn with you and get her on the milk stand. Wash her udder well with a white washcloth and warm slightly soapy water with maybe a small dollop of Clorox.. don't get her udder real wet, just wring out the cloth, and make sure you get her teats clean.. I usually end up folding the cloth a few times untill her teats are clean.. discard the first two squirts then milk a bit into your cup and taste it warm..
    If it's still goaty, it may be something she's eating, or she could have something going on in her udder...
    If it tastes fine warm, maybe she's still goat bucky smell on her and the hairs are getting into the milk..??
    maybe others will have better ideas.... ??
     

  3. geminigoats

    geminigoats Well-Known Member

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    I'm with Stacy, clean up her udder and wash her, if you can get your hands on some coffee soap, many of the goat folks who make soap sell it. The coffee takes away the scent of the buck. Another possible porblem may be mastitis. If after giving her a nice bath, if she is still producing that off taste try testing her milk for mastitis. Mastitis doesn't always have to come out in cottage chees elike chunks or flecks. Also, have you changed her feed at all? What are you feeding her? Sometimes feed and diet can cause off flavors as well. What do you usually use for a milk bucket and storage of the milk? Plastic containers absorb the fat globules of milk and then cause odors which come out in the milk. Doesn't matter how well you scrub those plastic containers out. I guess thats about all I can think of.

    Bernice
     
  4. doralee

    doralee Member

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    Udders are washed with an antibacterial soap wash using warm water then dryed. When I'm finished milking I use bag balm on her udder.The stand could probably use a better cleaning. I'll get busy on that.
    The containers all are sterilized before using.
    The milk is put into a freezer for quick cooling. Then screened and placed in glass quart jars. I was reading through some answers to other posted questions which suggested using baking soda to get rid of any smells, so she is getting a dusting tonight. The pen has ben cleaned, drenched,bark placed down to absorb any oders then racked up and a second load put down. Both my does were getting grass hay all day free choice, then during milking they were getting a mixture of dairy goat food and dry cob. When the milk didn't get better, I switch them to alfalfa during the day, a flake in the morning than a second at night, and I added 1/2 teaspoon of vitamin E to their night milking grain. {someone suggested it would help} since then I have switch them back to grass hay during the day. Their grain ration is now 1/3 mixtures of rabbit food, dairy goat ration, and dry cob with alittle BOSS{the sunflower seeds} I dont think this is their food. Both goats are milked dry. There are no irregularities with either ones udders.

    I'm at my wits end! Is there a huge difference between Lamancha milk and Nubian?

    Thanks so much for your postings! Doralee
     
  5. doralee

    doralee Member

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    The milk IS fine when warm, its after it cools that I taste the musky goaty thing.
    Thank you, Doralee
     
  6. Stacy Adams

    Stacy Adams Well-Known Member

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    Try filtering it first, and then cooling it... you may also want to try cooling it quicker by puttin it in an ice-water bath for a bit before puttin it in the freezer.. It cools much quicker that way.. and if you filter it first, then you aren't cooling it with that stray hair/whatever floating around in there...
     
  7. Vicki McGaugh TX Nubians

    Vicki McGaugh TX Nubians Well-Known Member

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    When I'm finished milking I use bag balm on her udder.
    .......................

    This is the first thing that came to mind. When using balms or oily lotions on the teats, it makes the perfect enviornment for staph. Under the grease and next to the warm skin is the perfect high humidity temp to grow staph in a culture. Also besides slightly uneven udders, the only symptom of subclinical staph is milk that doesn't keep. So you may be looking a staph in the doe. Using something labeled for staph this dry up, in the udder maybe an idea.

    Another thought is the antibacterial soap. Do you know that once you add water, it is no longer anti-anything? Read this on the label it'self, it will tell you that it is only antibacterial straight from the container, do not add water :) Of course straight this is much too drying for the udder.

    Shaving udders and belly is the only way to milk if you are hand milking. I know in the frozen north this is not an option, so extra care has to be taken in keeping the belly hair and dirt on in out of the milk. I loved watching the PBS frontier house episodes, and if I had to hand milk I would put a piece of buttermuslin over my milk bucket, secrued with string or a large rubber band, and milk into/through this. They milked long very hairy toggs in the last episode, it didn't help that the little gal they had milking hated the whole thing :)

    Worming is another consideration, as is nutrition, I would nix the rabbitt pellets, they contain considerably more animaly by products than rumiant feeds. In my area they are the same price as my alfalfa pellets, which would be a much better form of calcium and protein rather than the rabbitt feed. Noone should be feeding chicken or rabbitt feed, or any other non ruminant feed without really understanding all the forms meat and meat by products can get into the grain. Esepcially dog and cat food.

    Also Julia made an excellent point on knowing the temp of your fridge. Vicki
     
  8. Rosarybeads

    Rosarybeads Well-Known Member

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    Hmm, this is very interesting. I read this post this morning, because I am dealing with the same thing, I am milking two goats, and have been mixing their milk together. I notice when I try to drink it that it almost has a "film" that tastes very goaty that leaves a goat taste in my mouth that really disgusts me. So this morning I milked one goat and tried her milk warm, and it was good. Of course, I don't like warm milk, but... The second goat had a "filmy" feel to it, and didn't taste as good, although it still tasted okay. I have pretty much the same routine as doralee, I bring in the milk, run it through a coffee filter in a canning jar, and refrigerate. I tried the freezer chilling this morning, keeping the two goat's milk separate, so when hubby gets home we are going to have a goat milk taste test session. :) What should the refrigerator be set at?

    Also, one goat has a more round bag, her bag is still "full" looking when I milk her, and her nipples are round and short, and the other one has a longer, thinner bag, that is completely wrinkled up after I milk her, with longer nipples that have a much slower flow... Is this normal?
     
  9. doralee

    doralee Member

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    wonderful ideas, thanks Vicki, doralee
     
  10. Stacy Adams

    Stacy Adams Well-Known Member

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    Without expensive cooling equipment, the fastest way to chill your milk is in an ice-water bath.. it's way colder than the fridge or freezer alone.. you could use a cooler (depends on how many jars you need to cool) or a pot as tall as your jar, and fill with water to 1/3 the height of your jars, then fill with ice. swirl the milk in the jars every now and then and they will chill in a heart beat..
     
  11. NewlandNubians

    NewlandNubians Well-Known Member

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    Almost always I've found that mineral deficiencies cause bad tasting milk with the swiss and lamanchas. Give her a selenium shot if you are deficient in your area and see if that helps. Re-evaluate your mineral mix and make sure it contains enough of everything, especially copper & selenium. I like to give a little kelp with my minerals here & there for iodine too. Don't give up on her yet. Try these things first. Everyone always points their fingers at handling but I've found even fairly poorly handled milk still tasted okay. Bucks really will taint the milk, but it's noticeably bucky tasting. The taste you are describing sounds more like mineral related than environmental.