Mulefoot hogs..

Discussion in 'Pigs' started by Terry W, Jan 12, 2007.

  1. Terry W

    Terry W Duchess of Cynicism

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    Does anyone here have experience with these guys? Would I be too far over my head as a first time pig grower with them? or should I find a more "natural" rare breed? I am NE Ohio00 and am also wonder if weather like we are having now would harm them-- 45 degrees yesterday, 20 degrees tonight and tomorrow--
     
  2. pancho

    pancho Well-Known Member

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    You can do a search and find the post about the mulefoot hog, I think some call it a choctaw hog. Really there is no such breed. A mule foot hog will crop up every once, especially in feral hogs. The mule foot can be bred for but it isn't a recognized breed. Mostly it is just a mixed breed hog.
     

  3. tyusclan

    tyusclan Well-Known Member

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    This is incorrect. While it is true that a mulefoot will occasionally crop up in different hogs, there is a recognized breed of Mulefoot hog, and a breed association. They are the rarest breed of hog in this country, and are a breed of critical concern with the ALBC.

    There is an excellent article on Mulefoots on this site:

    www.ansi.okstate.edu/breeds/swine/
     
  4. pancho

    pancho Well-Known Member

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    I know about the so called breed. I also know some of the people who raise and sell the so called breed. I also know where they got their stock.
    A study in genetics will show the truth.
    It is possible to call any type, color, or size hog a breed. You can even start a breed association. That does not really mean that it isd really a breed.

    Does a hamp crop up in durocs? Does a poland crop up in chesters?
     
  5. tyusclan

    tyusclan Well-Known Member

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    I've been through this discussion on this site before, and I really don't care to do it again. I've given the information. Take it or leave it.
     
  6. tinknal

    tinknal Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I'm interested too. any information about them in northern climates?
     
  7. tyusclan

    tyusclan Well-Known Member

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    Hogs are very hardy, and there's no reason they wouldn't do as well as any other hogs in the north. With a little preparation and some shelter you shouldn't have any problem. The problem is finding the stock because of the rarity. Check with the ALBC; as they would probably have the latest information on breeders.
     
  8. tinknal

    tinknal Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Yes it does. As long as you are breeding for traits from a closed group, it is a breed.
     
  9. pancho

    pancho Well-Known Member

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    No, it doesn't make them a breed. They may have the same traits but a breed is a lot more than just one trait. Go to any of the small sale barns in southeastern Okla. and you can find mulefoot hogs every once in a while. They are fairly common in the feral hogs located there. They come in all sizes, colors, and types. Just another trait if some feral hogs.
     
  10. tinknal

    tinknal Well-Known Member Supporter

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    You obviously didn't read my post. I can go to my local sale barn and find cattle with long horns, but that doesn't make them Longhorns. Does this mean Longhorns are not a breed?

    Your arguement is spurious.
     
  11. pancho

    pancho Well-Known Member

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    Not much of an argument. The longhorn is a recognized breed. The mulefoot isn't. A longhorn is bred for their long horns but there are other traits also. The mulefoot has only one trait in common with other mulefoot, the foot. The longhorn has been a recognized breed for many years. The mulefoot has never been a recognized breed. The long horn is easy recognized, the only way you can tell a mulefoot is to look at their feet.
    The mulefoot is just a fad. A way to sell a low priced feral hog for much more than it would bring any other way. It has been found in feral hogs for many years but it is just a trait.
    Like I said, you can go to any of the small sale barns in southeastern Okla. and find them. They sell for the same price as any other feral hogs. If they are black they bring a little more, same as any black feral hog.
    It don't bother me to see people spend money on some feral hog that can be caught in many places. I always get a laugh when a black pig comes through the sale barn and the price goes up just because he is black. They are sold to game farms as wild boars. Doesn't matter that it is just a feral hog, it still brings more just because it is black and can be sold to those who do not know better as a wild boar.
    I think it is a good thing as many of my relatives catch and sell feral hogs. Anything that will get them a higher price is great for me. Just be prepared to hear some laughter when you tell an experienced hog raiser that you have a rare mulefoot. Maybe you will be lucky and they will wait until you leave before laughing.
     
  12. tyusclan

    tyusclan Well-Known Member

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    I said I wasn't going to do this but here goes. I knew a breeder in Texas who had a herd of registered Mulefoots 30 years ago. It is and has been a recognized breed for a long time. The animal science department of Okalahoma State calls it a breed, and the ALBC calls it a breed.

    Not every breed of animal is identical in color or conformation. Some breed developers want every animal to look the same, and that is part of their program to set that type. Others could care less what color they are, or if all of them are exactly the same size. They have certain traits they are breeding for, and let other externals fall where they may. The Beefmaster is one example of this.
    Once the traits that are desired are set those traits will show up consistently in the offspring. The overall phenotype may fall within broader parameters than other breeds, but they still breed true within those parameters.

    The feral hogs you see come through the sale may be mulefooted, but that doesn't mean they're a Mulefoot.
     
  13. pancho

    pancho Well-Known Member

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    My family thanks you for the free advertisement.
     
  14. tyusclan

    tyusclan Well-Known Member

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    I've always made it a point to be kind and civil in my replies even in disagreement, but you are one of the most trying individuals I've ever seen. I don't know who you are or where you are, so I fail to see how anything I've said is an advertisement for you or your family.

    This is my last post on this subject. Have a nice life.
     
  15. pancho

    pancho Well-Known Member

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    Just because I have different opinions than you do does not make me wrong.
    Just because I have more experience and knowledge about mulefoot hogs does not make me a trying individual.
    I have tried to explain what the mulefoot is and where it can be bought for a very cheap price. It can be bought for a much less price if you go to where the animal is caught.
    The mulefoot hog is much like the ostrich, llama, emu, buffalo. It is a passing fad. The people selling it at ridiculous prices are doing the same way as those who sell fad animals. Selling to someone who does not know any better and think they are getting a bargain.
    If you buy mulefoot hogs or do not buy means little to me. I hope I have at least got you to do a little research above listening to the sellers. Maybe others who have read this thread will learn a little about them also.

    Some of my relatives catch feral hogs in southeastern Okla. They sell these feral hogs to others. Some are mulefoot hogs. If there are more people who will believe the mulefoot is really a rare breed they will get more for their hogs. That is why I thank you for the free advertisement for the mulefoot.

    When they catch feral hogs they usually seperate them according to color. The black hogs bring a better price than other colors even though they come from the same litter. Run two littermates in the ring together, a black and a white. The black will bring sometimes twice the price as the white. Same hogs, same litter, different prices because one can be called a wild boar because it is black. The people buying know they are the same but those they sell to do not know any better. Same goes with the mulefoot.
     
  16. GeorgiaberryM

    GeorgiaberryM Well-Known Member

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    Mulefoots are absolutely a breed. They were found on an Atlantic island where they had been left by the Spanish quite some time ago. I'm not going to go into documentation here because it is readily available--just do a Google or go to your library. Genetic mutation happens in every line, but that is not what is going on here. These people who show, write standards, etc. know what they are doing. Try bringing your German Shepard in to a Bull Dog show just because it has large haunches and a snub nose. The feral hogs could easily have mulefoot in them. Many of the feral hogs here have been here for centuries.

    I, also, would be interested in this rare breed. It would be fun to offer and own something like this. I wonder what Leviticus would say about Mulefoots. Maybe my Jewish friends could finally have pork chops.
    Husband o'G
     
  17. APPway

    APPway Well-Known Member Supporter

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    By 1900, the Mulefoot had become a standardized breed. It was valued for ease of -fattening and production of meat, lard, and especially hams. Mulefoot hogs were distributed throughout the Corn Belt. They were also common along the Mississippi River Valley, where farmers ranged their hogs on the islands in the river, putting them out to forage in the spring and collecting them in the fall. In the early 1900s there were two Mulefoot breed associations and over 200 herds registering purebred stock.


    http://albc-usa.org/cpl/mulefoot.html
     
  18. pancho

    pancho Well-Known Member

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    I personally know two of the people who advertise and raise the mulefoot hogs. I also know where they got their breeding stock as I was the one who advised them where they could find the hog. I went with them when they went to find their foundation stock.
     
  19. Terry W

    Terry W Duchess of Cynicism

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    That would be interesting, as the prohibition against pork is because it is a split hooved animal that DOES NOT RUMINATE. Join up that hoof, it doesn't need to ruminate? NEAT idea!! However, i DO know of a few members of a Hassidic group that regularly have a "white roast"-- they don't ask the butcher what the specific meat is-- and he keeps his mouth shut about it!!!
     
  20. GeorgiaberryM

    GeorgiaberryM Well-Known Member

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    You can't sell a pig as a Yorkshire just because it is pink and expect to not get your butt sued off. You can't just call a pig a Mulefoot and make it a Mulefoot. Foundation stock or not, it needs to be the breed that you say it is or it needs to be sold as a mutt.
    Husband o'G