Mulch/compost,what are you doing?

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by mightybooboo, Sep 5, 2004.

  1. mightybooboo

    mightybooboo Well-Known Member

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    I have silt and pine needles.Ive been making compost with needles,dead veggies,shredded junk mail and cow poo.Slow but it works.Paper decomposes fast and big fat worms in it.
    Been mulching my garden beds with junk mail thru the office shredder.It makes pieces 1/8" X 1/2" or so long.Makes a mat of matter which the water flows right thru,and holds that water well.Was just rolling water off,now its soaking right in.Went out today and lifted paper,still wet after 3 days of full sun,unprotected area is dry and hard.It already has cut water use way back,looks pretty good too.
    So...what is your compost/mulch method?
    BooBoo
     
  2. countrygrrrl

    countrygrrrl PITA

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    So far, mostly old straw and hay, coffee grounds, egg shells, and plants (just threw a bunch of baby's breath and tomayo vines on one bed). There's so many critters here, I'm too scared to toss much else right on the beds --- I had some totally ruined bananas I really wanted to put out but --- hmmm! TOO MANY CRITTERS AROUND HERE! :eek:
     

  3. DayBird

    DayBird Big Bird

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    Pet store 'stuff', pre-bagged and free for the taking. Before we moved here, I made many great beds by breaking apart the free pallets and nailing them back in the shape I want, laying down the free cardboard and covering it all with the free petstore "stuff." Grew great tomatoes. When we moved here, there was nothing but a ragged fig tree. A couple bags of ferret bedding did that bush great good. We're moving home soon so I've given up but when we get back to St. Clair county, I'll be bringing it all home again.
     
  4. mistletoad

    mistletoad Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I shred every scrap of paper I find and bag it up to use in the chicken house. After they are done with it, it goes out to a compost heap. I mow with a bagger and compost all the clippings, as we have grass "promenades" through the field as well as the lawns around the house there are always plenty of grass clippings. We collect free mulch from the county, some mulches the trees, some mulches the paths and some is run through the chipper shredder and added to the compost heaps. Autumn leaves are raked and run through the chipper shredder and added to the compost heaps. All veggies peelings and left overs and spent plants are composted. We plant green manure in the fall.
    We don't mulch anything but the trees - all the compost added to our clay makes for great beds that hold water well and I weed like a maniac (more fodder for the compost heaps).

    It helps to include the next generation in all this compost making, this picture was taken on New Year's Day, 2004.
    [​IMG]
     
  5. steff bugielski

    steff bugielski Well-Known Member

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    I am trying my own method of perma mulch. I have a very large garden, almost an acre. The the thought of laying down hay on all of it does not pay. The thought of transporting all that compost makes my back hurt. so as I clean stalls and remove bedding from 30 goats and 100 chickens I am putting it directly onto the garden. It only goes in places where nothing is growing. By the time the veggies are done for the fall it will be covered. We had so much rain here that I lost most of the garden early. It can't be worse it has to be better next year.
    steff
     
  6. Ravenlost

    Ravenlost Well-Known Member Supporter

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    We've barely begun to farm our place (one chicken, haven't even moved the horses yet, four tomato plants this year) but I just found an opportunity to get fresh sawdust DELIVERED free! We're going to use that as the base of our mulching next year. Am hoping in the future to have great compost using the hay/manure from the horse stalls, along with the chicken coop sweepings. I'm already throwing all kitchen compostables into an old garbage can to compost.
     
  7. southerngurl

    southerngurl le person Supporter

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    :( I'm jealous! LOL!

    The pet store thing was is a good idea, depending on what they use for bedding.
     
  8. mightybooboo

    mightybooboo Well-Known Member

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    A friend of mine got local gardners to deliver wood chips by stopping at job sites and telling em to drop it at his place.He then tore out his front yard grass,mulched heavily and planted flowers.Yard was a showplace,folks would walk by and stop and just oogle the place,it was awesome!One of his 'tight' neighbors called the city code enforcement on him and they came out to inspect his yard!Fortunately they didnt cite him,but did tell him if he dropped anymore chips on his driveway they would! This was the City of Orange in Orange County,Ca.
    Hopefully you can use this idea and get a better reception than he did!
    BooBoo
     
  9. breezynosacek

    breezynosacek Well-Known Member

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    Gee, whatever happened to being able to pursue happiness?
     
  10. southerngurl

    southerngurl le person Supporter

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    Busybodies
     
  11. suelandress

    suelandress Windy Island Acres Supporter

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    Yep. There's something to be said for living in the middle of nowhere :)
    Of course, nobody to admire your handiwork either ;)
     
  12. mightybooboo

    mightybooboo Well-Known Member

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    Ahh,but Im sure the wildlife is enjoying it very much! :)
    BooBoo
     
  13. southerngurl

    southerngurl le person Supporter

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    Yea, sometimes I wish that my garden was by the side of the road so people could ooh and aah over it. :cool: But, when the squash has squash bugs, corn is blown over by a storm, and the tomatoes have some kind of blight, well then I'm glad it's hidden away. :haha:
     
  14. southerngurl

    southerngurl le person Supporter

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    Yes, they just love the flavor!
     
  15. breezynosacek

    breezynosacek Well-Known Member

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    The reason I'm more greatful we don't have a lot of neighbors??? I can go out the door in shorts and no bra without worrying if my legs are shaved or not! :p
     
  16. mightybooboo

    mightybooboo Well-Known Member

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    Hmmm....so can I :haha:
    Mr.BooBoo
     
  17. DayBird

    DayBird Big Bird

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    At my store, we use ground corn cobs in the bird cages. That has seeds in it so it must be composted or used to grow a nice cover crop of oats and millets. We use pine shavings for the hamsters, gerbils, rabbits and guineapigs. It comes loaded with manure and with some alfalfa pellets usually mixed it. It makes a great mulch around trees and bushes without having to be composted. It does, however make great compost in very little time. We use CareFresh with the ferrets. It's a recycled paper product. It decomposes very rapidly.
     
  18. southerngurl

    southerngurl le person Supporter

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    I think our pet store uses that Feline Pine stuff for all their animals. That's what I use for my rabbit.
     
  19. DayBird

    DayBird Big Bird

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    Feline Pine is basically compressed pine shavings/sawdust. That should work great. Ask them if you can have it. Anything used in bird cages will have seeds in it that will sprout into the most wonderful mixture of things imaginable. Peppers, pumpkins, sunflowers, millets (white, red and the giant proso), oats, wheat, corn and canary grass. I really enjoy spreading it out on bare ground and letting it grow, using what I can and feeding the rest to my parrots. The second year, the soil is greatly improved and is ready for planting. Anything not coming from a bird cage should be very high in nitrogen (manure, aka "stuff") and should make great compost for you.

    I use Feline Pine at home in the litter box. We scoop the solids and toss them in the trash and empty the used litter under the azaleas. I've always heard not to use cat manure in the compost so I've never tried. Does anyone know why?
     
  20. Ed in S. AL

    Ed in S. AL Well-Known Member

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    Today I hit the jackpot mother load of bunnie pooh. Met a feller who has hundreds of rabbits. Told me I can have all I wanted for my garden and other needs. Got one truck load today, and probably still have another 3 or four truck loads left to get. Just going to pick a spot out back, and start piling it up. Also save all of my scraps for composting. Pine straw for mulching I get from my neighbor behind me. They have a hundred acres or more of 10 year old pines. Just show up and start racking what I want. I add leaves to the garden as well. I show up at grandmas house and start racking in the pecan orchard.