moving water

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by mike0331, Jun 4, 2005.

  1. mike0331

    mike0331 Member

    Messages:
    19
    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2002
    Location:
    bethpage,mo.
    ok here is the set up i have to move water 100' with about a 10' -15'lift from a small spring /creek..... i was wondering #1 cant i use a 12 volt bilge pump (750)gph )to move this water or is there a diffrent way i can do this i do not have electricity and what is a good compost starter
     
  2. NWSneaky

    NWSneaky Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    266
    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2005
    Hmmmmmmmmm. Maybe get an old tank somewhere and hook it to the vacumm line on your vehicle --- suck the air out and let it suck the water in???

    On compost, just pile it and let it do its thing. I have tons of it and never used anybody's products or 'starters'.
     

  3. Ozarks_1

    Ozarks_1 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    250
    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2003
    Location:
    Ark. Ozark Mtns. (Marion County)
    Can you use a ram pump?

    At first thought, a bilge pump "sounds" like a good idea ... BUT they're not built for long-term useage. An agricultural sprayer pump is probably a better choice.
     
  4. moopups

    moopups In Remembrance

    Messages:
    7,102
    Joined:
    May 12, 2002
    Location:
    In beautiful downtown Sticks, near Belleview, Fl.
    Yes to the hydrostatic ram, more info in the archives under 'water' catagory. As for 'compost starter', thats a waste of money, its all self starting.
     
  5. fordy

    fordy Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    9,268
    Joined:
    Sep 13, 2003
    Location:
    Whiskey Flats(Ft. Worth) , Tx
    .............http://www.riferam.com/sling/index.htm
    .............This is probably pretty close to what you'll need , they aren't cheap but atleast you won't have to pay for electricity. fordy.. :)
     
  6. Roxie

    Roxie New Member

    Messages:
    3
    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2005
    Location:
    South Carolina

    Mike0331----#1---You probably won't get any water or very little because of the 10 to 15ft rise and the 100ft distance, the bilge pump is not designed for pressure and it will take a few lb's of pressure to get the water up that incline, that distance. The pump will clog with the first small weed. I tried basically this same deal. I even tried a sump pump hooked to a inverter--hooked to the battery---I just got tired of messing with it----bought a small Farm type gas pump--now when I want to fill my water tank or whatever- I just crank the pump and let it run for a few minutes. BUT, if you want to give it a shot figure out how much lift you have--if its 10ft then add a couple of feet to that, now take a SAY 12ft piece of pvc pipe ond hook it to your bilge pump real tight fitting----now turn your pump on--hold the 12ft pipe straight up into the air/pump in the water---if your pump will deliver a fair amount of water out the top of the pipe and you are satisfied then what I would do is figure out how to put a bucket/barrel up into the air that high right above the pump(attach it to a pole, 2x4 or somethimg) get or make a pipe adapter to put into a hole drilled into the bottom of the bucket/barrel to hook a hose to- then what you are wanting to happen is for the pump to pump the water into the bucket/barrel then FREE-FLO from the bucket to where ever you need it up hill. The bucket will have to be a little higher that whatever is up hill where you want the water delivered. This way your pump want have to try to pump the weight of ever how many gallons of water that is in a 100ft hose up a 10 to 15ft incline---it will only have to push up the small amount that is in a 12ft pipe or ever how long it has to be.

    #2 on the compost starter you can use dry dog food then wet it, but you can also use things like garden waste, what you are after is using something that will sour/rot to start the pile to heat up. Good Luck----Fire-Man on the borrowed computer.
     
  7. Windy in Kansas

    Windy in Kansas In Remembrance

    Messages:
    11,076
    Joined:
    Jun 16, 2002
    Location:
    South Central Kansas
    An excellent compost starter is a shovelful or two of dirt. Oops, forgot Cabin Fever reads here, make that soil, not dirt.