Moving plants from old home to new farm

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by A'sta at Hofstead, Sep 27, 2006.

  1. A'sta at Hofstead

    A'sta at Hofstead Turkey Wrangler

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    I live in New Hampshire where it is already pretty cold, I have two low bush blueberries in the yard at our old house and also two raspberry bushes, the blueberries really only started producing this year, is it too late in the season to move them to the farm from my old place (the home is on the market so we still own it) I also have clematis, hydrandra (the endless summer type) and we maybe want to take one of the varigated lilacs. We plan to leave a lot of the stuff, cause I am selling it "landscaped" with pics of the lilies, etc. But some of these plants were costly (the endless summer hydrangeas were $30.00 each! and the var. lilac we planted last spring was even more!) Is there any way to overwinter them in pots somehow, so we don't have to dig right now at the new place? (a lot of irons on the fire to say the least!) Thanks for any advice!
     
  2. Snugglebunny

    Snugglebunny Well-Known Member

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    Can I just say, as a former NH resident, Congrats on the new place!! I know first-hand that the market in NH/VT is a KILLER!!!
     

  3. A'sta at Hofstead

    A'sta at Hofstead Turkey Wrangler

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    Well thanks! A customer of mine at our sign shop came in this spring and said... you seem like the types who would like to spend the next 30 years fixing up and old farm house, went saw it - loved it.... it never even went on the market! The guys dad has alzheimers and they had to put him in a home, the kids didnt want it even though they grew up there.... it is a PEACH! 2.5 acres, 2 workshops, tractor barn, another adorable out building, the home is soooo charming too, has an old glenwood wood range in the kitchen, it was built sometime in the 1800s, have to go to the historical society to find out just when!
     
  4. Snugglebunny

    Snugglebunny Well-Known Member

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    Oh man, that's a rare gem. We moved from an apartment to a small house on a quarter acre in Nov. We're working up to having a farm like you described (tho we want to stay in our current town). It's tough finding anything affordable in this area!
     
  5. rwinsouthla

    rwinsouthla Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I like to wait until first frost but if you're in a time crunch, dig 'em up now. Get as much of the rootball as possible. Dig a hole at the new place 2X in diameter of the rootball on the plant and drop it in. Add the dirt that you took from the hole. Water well the first time and again if it doesn't rain in more than 5-6 days. They should be okay. Probably 80% chance of survival depending on how much of the roots you get. The more roots you get, the better chance of survival.
     
  6. A'sta at Hofstead

    A'sta at Hofstead Turkey Wrangler

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    Thank You- any ideas on potting them up and overwintering that way? I am really busy with the inside and the winter prep and if I can wait to dig holes until I KNOW where I want them in the spring it would be ideal- Thanks
     
  7. Triffin

    Triffin Well-Known Member

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    If you haven't sold your place yet,
    Why not leave them where they are and
    transplant them in the Spring ??

    I'm sure any buyer would allow you to
    take your plants as long as you let them
    know upfront that that's what you have in mind ..

    Triff ..
     
  8. rwinsouthla

    rwinsouthla Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Sure. You'll have to get some pots that are bigger than the rootball....that's the problem. They aren't readily available for cheap. If you have access to some old 55 gal plastic drums, you can cut them in half and make two pots each. Or, if you know anyone in the landscape business, ask them for some. I would first, find the appropriate pots. Secondly, get some decent to good soil. Third, put them in the pots and cover with soil. Water them and make sure they don't dry out. Put in the sun. A little root stimulator wouldn't hurt but isn't necessary. Should be okay.

    edited to add......you can always skip the pots. Just put the plants' rootballs on the ground and cover with some decent dirt. Then cover with some leaves you can rake up your self. Make sure the dirt covers the whole root ball and slopes away gently. I'd say 12-18 inches of dirt sloped away all the way around the root ball should be sufficient. More for bigger plants, less for smaller plants. Mulch them to keep the ground moist. When you dig them up in the spring, the root ball may have sent roots down into the soil underneath but not by much. You may want to put a little dirt on the ground to start with so the roots that do grow during the winter will go into loose dirt and not the existing soil where it would be difficult to dig up and break the roots. When you plant them in the spring, just dig a hole the size of the root ball plus the dirt you put around them now to keep from shocking them. Root stimulator in the spring is highly recommended. And keep them watered. Lack of water kills a lot of plants.
     
  9. Bluebird

    Bluebird Well-Known Member

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    If you don't have the time now, just write in your listing and then sales contract that which ever plants you want are not included in the sale. Don't count on a hand shake with a potential buyer that you can take the plants you want next spring. Lost a great collection of hosta that way after collecting for a number of years.
     
  10. cathryn

    cathryn Well-Known Member

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    Just a thought. Is there a horse farm in the area that is willing to bring you a load of old manure? You could dig up the plants and put them in there. Water them in well, and mulch them with whatever you have. In the spring you can figure out where you want them to go. They should transplant easily out of the manure.

    I would think twice about leaving anything at your old house. Not all sales and closings go as planned. A buyers minds can change once the house is theirs.

    Good luck on your new property. NH is a great state. We hope to get up to NH at some point... but not yet. I will keep an eye out for you to see how things progress.

    Peace,
    cathryn
     
  11. bee

    bee WV , hilltop dweller Supporter

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    as you have been advised you can dig and then store in a mulch pile situation; many nurseries do overwinter balled or potted stock just that way. A couple of things to watch out for tho; the advice to watch drainage was good but be aware that some stuff is "food" for rodents as well and nice insulated mulch piles are very attractive for them and rabbits will chew up as far as snow pack around the plants will allow. Is there an unheated outbuilding at the new place you can store the plants in- in their pots? Nothing however is fool proof(or rodent proof) I have had mice eat roots out of potted stuff stored in my basement.... :grump: