moving next to an industrial site

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by ace admirer, Jul 18, 2006.

  1. ace admirer

    ace admirer Well-Known Member Supporter

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    If you move next to a industrial site, you give up some of your rights to the quiet enjoyment of your property. You can not move next to an industrial site and complain about smells ,noises or anything that has to do with industrial site operations. same same
     
  2. pyrnad

    pyrnad Well-Known Member

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    The Same goes for moving next to an airport or train tracks, or a working farm.
     

  3. ace admirer

    ace admirer Well-Known Member Supporter

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    exactly, one should not have a picture post card frame of reference when moving to any place. moving into the country is not all five board white fences, around a blue-green pasture with two horses under a shade tree.

    any law will be abused by someone. from what i've seen the right to farm law only comes into play when a city person moves next to a working farm and tries to force the farmer to do as the city persons thinks they should do.

    i'm sorry for you trouble, but you paint the right to farm law with a pretty broad brush.

    my neighbors think i should not be allowed on the roads with my tractors, or trucks, or anything that travels less than 55 mph. they think my cows should learn to poop away from the fence lines or maybe wear diapers or maybe eat something so that "their" poop should smell better or i don't know what. that they should not loar when they are missing a calf at 330 in the morning. they think i should not plow up fields for planting but rather leave them in green grass, they think i should not run heavy equipment except from 9:00 to 4:00 and some don't think i should be allowed to do that. that i should not be allowed to show my son how to target shoot on my land. that i should not be allowed to park equipment anywhere except under a four sided enclosed shed. or on and on i could go. over the past ten years, i have had to purchase a little over 200 ac. of surrounding land to try to keep the arrigant, know it all, better than thou, and in some cases just plain mean, neighbors at a distance. most of them have no problem tresspassing or throwing their trash on the farm they hate to be next so much. i tell you this, last time i counted i had 36 "neighbors" most from out of state. and there is no way in hewl i could ever satisfy them and TRY to make a living on a plot of land that my family has been working since before 1861 without the protection of RIGHT to FARM..

    like i said, sorry for your trouble, but,
     
  4. JAK

    JAK Well-Known Member

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    As a silver lining you might have more freedom to do what you want.
     
  5. Beeman

    Beeman Well-Known Member

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    Actually if you get enough neighbors together and you have a nice enough neighborhood yo can evetually squeeze out the business and increase your land values. I have raced cars for years and have seen many racetracks that were there long before the houses slowly get closed down. It happens with industrial sites also. If you have the patience and perseverance to call and complain about every infraction of every rule and reg. they will eventually give up. They will then go to where they can do business without people hassling them, like Mexico.
     
  6. rambler

    rambler Well-Known Member Supporter

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    It is my experience that, in fact, the new neighbors _do_ restrict, control, & change the rules on the exsisting industry, farm, airport, etc.

    I don't _agree_ with that.

    But, it is what happens all the time.


    I'm curious what will happen when the perpetual farm easements (some legal structures set up to protect farm land from turning into anything else, keep taxes lower, etc.) run into the sprawling suburbs.

    The legal showdowns will be monumental. So it's perpetual farm land - but they can pass laws that no livestock is allowed; no slow vehicles; no dust; no smells over a certain level; no tillage. And so on.

    What happens when the farmland easement headbutts with the no farming allowed laws?

    Then we get into the new eminent domain powers that cities have - but no, I'll stop. I'll just get all wound up....

    --->Paul
     
  7. JAK

    JAK Well-Known Member

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    I reality we never really own land. We only pay for it.
     
  8. foxtrapper

    foxtrapper Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Factually untrue. People routinely do move in next to industrial sites and complain about smells noises and anything to do with industrial site operations. In many cases their complaints force changes in the industrial site operation, and in some cases force it to shut down completely.
     
  9. Unregistered

    Unregistered Well-Known Member

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    In most cases the farmer can make more money by splitting up his farm into lots than he ever made by farming. Not many will turn down the high prices paid for lots.
    I know of one farmer that turned down $1 million per acre for his small 28 acres wheat field. Not many would turn it down.
     
  10. Wendy

    Wendy Well-Known Member

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    And I know a farmer that turned down 3 million dollars for his farm. Some people don't care about money. His farm was in the family for several generations & I was glad to see him turn it down. What happens when all the farms are made in to suburbs? Who will feed this country?
     
  11. wy_white_wolf

    wy_white_wolf Just howling at the moon

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    Mexico and China :help: :help: It's be the final step to our own dimise
     
  12. citilivin

    citilivin Well-Known Member

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    It's usually land values the end a use. When land values are increasing because of different land uses, it's typically more economical to sell the land and move on.