Moving Goats

Discussion in 'Goats' started by Chuck, Jun 30, 2005.

  1. Chuck

    Chuck Well-Known Member Supporter

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    We close next week on our new house, which is about 5 hours from our old one. I'm going to load our ten goats and 40 chickens up in a trailer after we close on this house and drive them down to the new place.

    Are there any special considerations I need to know about moving animals like this? I've never done it before.
     
  2. dale anne

    dale anne Well-Known Member

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    Howdy chuck....that long a drive will put alot of stress on the goats...so positive bacteria will be needed[your choice of brand]..stop every so often to give water and lots of hay for them to lay on and eat...I would also stop and check from time to time to make sure no one is tangled in lead ropes[if you are going to tie them down]if you do time them down make sure they have enough lead to lay down but not to get tangled in....I once drove with SIL from philadelphia to florida with 15 goats and a horse...took us 2 days!...we also stopped at small road side parks and let the goats walk as they seemed to get a bit stiff...also I dont know about the laws in the states you are going to drive in but we had to poat signs on the back and sides of the trailer saying live animals...and do not touch[I reckon for when we stopped]...after the trip we only had problems with one goat who bloated up on us about an hour after arriving...she made it and all was good...also might want to keep a first aid box at ready including bloat ease,baking soda,blood stop powder,stomach tube,mouth speculum,and bandages....good luck and keep us updated on how ya fair...dale anne
     

  3. Vicki McGaugh TX Nubians

    Vicki McGaugh TX Nubians Well-Known Member

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    5 hours wouldn't be a consideration, most of our shows we go to are right at that. I would try to haul babies and milkers NOT during the heat of the day. I would also make several trips, take the milkers and kids, than the bucks and dry stock, with the hens if you have to. My girls would freak with the hens flapping and squawking during the trip.

    Haul the goats first thing in the morning so they have the day to see their new home before dark. Keep lights on in their new area and trap them into it, you don't want them roaming a new place in the dark. Make sure they know where their new water is.

    Probiotics like what was talked about before, and what a great time to worm, in the 5 hours in the trailer plus loading and unloading time, you could leave your parasties behind at the old place and in the trailer by worming them before the trip! Have fun, and congrats on the new place.

    Start the haul with a good amount of fresh hay in the bottom of the trailer, get there, no stops except for gas then offload with lots of water and spend some time with the stock. Offload the hay into a compost pile or burn it, do not put it into the barn. Make sure your next haul starts with clean hay again, you don't want humidty build up from ammonia. Vicki
     
  4. Cygnet

    Cygnet Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I've travelled that far easily, with my pack goats, loaded into the back of my pickup. Not a problem.

    You might try FEEDING the goats in the trailer for the next few days to get them used to it.. How they travel depends on the goat -- my packers view truck rides in the same light that my dogs do, i.e., the best treat ever. Things to look at, new smells, and treats when I stop. My nigie doe, OTOH, panicks if I so much as lead her TO the truck.

    Make sure they have ample water -- stop and water them.

    On the chickens, keep an eye on them. Chickens don't handle stress in summer heat very well. :( Might consider travelling at night and even spraying the birds down if there's somewhere you can stop, depending on your weather.

    Leva
     
  5. Chuck

    Chuck Well-Known Member Supporter

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  6. mary,tx

    mary,tx Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I'd tarp the front of the trailer to keep the wind off them. Don't drive in rain or in the heat of the day. And, of course, don't put water on the trailer. The hay, too, is going to blow right off if your trailer is not enclosed.
    mary
     
  7. mpillow

    mpillow Well-Known Member Supporter

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    This is how we move our herd... right after morning milking....probiotics the night before and in the morning.

    Babies are put into dog kennels in back of truck.

    We pair up adult goats according to established companionship. 2 goats to a stall (about 4*4). If you leave them all loose in a stock trailer they will pile up and one or more will be crushed. They get hay in the stall for the ride. Upon arrival they are given gatorade water (which they absolutely love). Probiotics again that evening at milking time. Mom's are usually anxious for their babies so be sure to reunite them ASAP. Blackberry and raspberry bushes are also a good thing to feed...it has something in it that helps when stressed. Pine and fir and cedar tips for vit.c.

    Hope things go smoothly! Definately separate the chix..!!
     
  8. sancraft

    sancraft Well-Known Member

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    When we moved our 60+ chickens, we put them in small packing boxes with holes on both sides for air. It was 2 birds per box. They settled right down. Then we loaded the boxes on the small trailer and in the bed of the truck and off me went. I stopped for gas after one hour (2 1/2 hour trip) and all seemed content. When we got there, we put all the boxes in the coop (temporary coop, large dog kennel) and open one box at a time. We set up the feeders and waterers before we started opening the boxes. THey all went immediately to the food and water. We didn't lose one to stress. The goats just laid down and enjoyed the ride. Every now and then we'd see Libby's nose at the top part of the horse trailer. :)