Moving a trailer to vacant land... without water

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by RyleeM, Jul 20, 2005.

  1. RyleeM

    RyleeM Active Member

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    Nebraska
    Hi,

    I am just curious how many people have done this before. We will be purchasing 5 acres this fall for $30,000. The owner is willing to carry the loan for us, so the we are putting $5000.00 down making small payments and then a large payment each spring from taxes, and the selling of bottle calves.

    There is a shell of a house on the land right now, that we will be fixing up. It is structurally sound, needs rewired, replummed, a new roof, and sheet rocked. There is a large barn and corrals that we have been keeping our calves and pigs in, and we just haul the water up to them. The well that had been working is about 1/4 mile from the place, on a corn field, but the pump is broken. Owner has not fixed it yet. He is going to fix and write an easement for that water. We are 99% sure that there is water under the acutal place as well, so when we save up enough money, we will have a well dug.

    Has anyone just moved a trailer onto land and started living? My husband has a full time job, and we have our first baby due in Nov. We would like to be into the trailer by oct, to get settled in before baby is born. My mom lives in a town about 10 miles from us, and water is free there. We think that we can get a large tank... 200 gal or so, and haul up there with pickup, and store behind house...

    Advice anyone?
     
  2. busy homestead

    busy homestead Well-Known Member

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    Your water tank idea will work until the weather turns and then it will
    freeze.

    Plan B?

    Christina
     

  3. RyleeM

    RyleeM Active Member

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    Nov 28, 2004
    Location:
    Nebraska
    ??? I dunno??? I was thinking I know that there are several people on here who haul water to their homestead... but I suppose that they are not in an area that gets below freezing?

    We could fill jugs of water and bring in house to heat... My husband works in the town that my mom lives in, so refilling each day would not be a problem.

    BTW: My husband, his 2 brothers, 1 sister, mom and dad all lived in pull along camping trailer for about 7 years while building the house they have now. He is used to living like this, and we both have farm/ranch upbringings... we are just stuck in town at the moment.
     
  4. deb

    deb Well-Known Member

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    Have you checked with the township it is in? I live in a very rural township, but it still has its own an ordinance that controls moving trailers and mobile home onto privately owned land. If the township doesn't care, then check with the county next.

    deb
    in wi
     
  5. SteveD(TX)

    SteveD(TX) Well-Known Member

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    Why can't the "owner" get the pump fixed by October? Seems to be the simplest solution. Pumps aren't that expensive.
     
  6. hollym

    hollym Well-Known Member

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    Actually I did a version of your water tank idea. For freezing weather we transferred it into those five gallon camping containers and hauled it inside. It was a hassle, but it worked just fine. There must be some way to figure out how cold it has to get for how long to freeze 200 gallons?

    Well, wow, you have a baby due, you are taking on a lot. But it can be done. I had my fourth on our place, just kept him in a pack during the day, in my bed at night and he stayed warm and happy.

    Take everything slowly until you are bounced back and your husband has more time. Otherwise you will get burned out. None of your projects are going anywhere and will be more successful if you take them in small steps and maintain your level of enthusiasm!

    Don't be ashamed to take an occasional what we called 'civilization break' at your mom's! We did motels every few months when we would get tired of it all, it really did give us a second wind to shower, eat pizza, watch a little tv, etc, sounds weak of will, but it helped.

    Good luck, sounds great!

    hollym
     
  7. vonettrich

    vonettrich Well-Known Member

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    We're thinking about moving to the Sandhills (we're in Omaha now). $30,000 for 5 acres sounds pricey, so I was wondering which part of the state you're in.
     
  8. twstanley

    twstanley Well-Known Member

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    I was thinking the same thing, but then they mentioned the barn, house that needs fixing, etc. So it might be about 10k worth of land, 15k worth of barn/corral and 5k worth of house....
     
  9. freeinalaska

    freeinalaska Well-Known Member

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    We have a 300 gallon tank, outside on a stand, for our animals, that we haul water to. I spray foam insulated it and use it all winter. By the end of the winter we loose about 20% of the storage capacity due to ice buildup on the inside of the tank but it doesn't freeze up totally. We have to break through a layer of ice at the fill hole to pump the water in and occasionally need to unfreeze the spigot with a torch, but it is really not too much hassle. Our winters are wicked cold, I mean below zero for many months and as low as 55 below. A neighbor does the same thing for his house, but he uses heat tape on the pipes running to his house with success.
     
  10. RyleeM

    RyleeM Active Member

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    Nebraska
    Thanks everyone...

    HollyM, what type of house/trailer did you live in? It sounds as though you did what we are trying to do. We are more than willing to come to mom's on our days off and relax!! I think that makes a big difference on how much you can accomplish.

    The township issue shouldn't be a big one... we are in very rural Nebraska, trailers are as common as houses.

    We are 15 miles from Scottsbluff NE, right next to the Wyoming border. Land here is a bit spendier than anything in the sandhills, as Scottsbluff is the largest town on this end of the state (only 26,000). $30,000 seems to be the going price for about 5 acres here, as like was already mentioned, there is an existing barn, and house that will be renovated, a chicken coup, and 3 very large corrals. Everything is set up for the electric, the water pipes run from the house, barn, and corrals to the existing well already, and there are two driveways.

    Thanks for the advice/ideas... please keep them coming. If anyone has done this, please share your story.
     
  11. jassytoo

    jassytoo Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Just my 2 cents worth re the easement and fixing the well. Ask him to fix the well now and get the easement put on the deed. Get everything IN WRITING before you sign anything. Could save you a heap of trouble later on.
     
  12. hollym

    hollym Well-Known Member

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    Rylee, we moved to 20 undeveloped acres in Montana with two kids, two dogs, three rabbits, and a 15' travel camper with a propane heater and stove. Our first one had an icebox for food keeping, later on we bought one with a tiny propane refrigerator, but ironically enough it never worked properly, because the wind always blew out the pilot! Later on I removed it from the trailer and installed it in a combination strawbale greenhouse/cooking shack that my older son and I built. It worked then.

    The kids were the ones that usually slept in the camper, we had a big tent set up with a bed and also a loveseat and armchair of all things, lol, but one thing you will crave is SPACE!

    The first thing that we did after setting up our camp area, was to fence and plant two garden areas. Then we found a source of mill end slabs that were I think $60 a flatbed load dumped at the foot of our hill, so we started building animal sheds and pens with those for siding/slats, and poles that we cut set in the ground. Then we were able to get some chickens and goats.

    I had a stove with a hole in the top that fit a big galvanized bucket perfectly, and heated water on that. Sometimes we washed clothes at the place, sometimes we went to town and used a laundromat at the truck stop while we ate a hot meal.

    It was so much fun! So much WORK, but I really enjoyed coming up with ways to get around no utilities, and no money!

    hollym
     
  13. Cygnet

    Cygnet Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Middle of nowhere along the Rim, Arizona
    My father has a cabin at 6500 feet in Arizona's Mogollon Rim country -- freezing temps are routine. Cabin has a well, but it's not reliable so he has a water tank. Last year he simply dropped a floating heating element (for a stock tank) into the 1,000 gallon tank and it kept the tank so warm that any snow that fell on it immediately melted ... assuming you have electric, this would be simple enough to set up. You'll want a backup plan if the tank is small and the electric goes out during bad weather. (Running a loop from the tank to a propane-heated water heater in your house and then a hose back to the tank works, raise the temp several degrees, shut things off for a few hours.)

    By next winter, he'll have his tank enclosed in a log cabin (with salvaged timber!) & will simply have a couple 100 watt light bulbs inside the building to keep things above freezing. You only have to keep the water above about 33 degrees to keep it from freezing ...

    Heat tape is your friend on outside pipes.

    Leva
     
  14. Blu3duk

    Blu3duk Well-Known Member

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    My nieghbor doesnt have a well yet, [funny thing he owns 2 well drilling rigs] but he put in 2 underground storage tanks, concrete rings and set up his own pump systems that go thru his battery storage.... last week he finally installed his solar panels after having them 3 years.... but his mobile is a 16x70 [ireally did not know that such a size was availabale] and he hauls water from my well in a 250 +/- palletized tank and fills his underground tanks.... only him and his wife, so they dont go through much water..... but his did not freeze this past winter, although it did not get extremely cold here in central idaho, we did have a couple feet of snow for awhile.

    A person can get above ground storage tanks of concrete built with attachments for fire trucks to hook into which could help also to bring fire insurance down if you "have" to carry that on your property for a mortgage. One can be built for around $2500-4000 by a outfit that sprays concrete dome houses with a capacity of around 4000 gallons....which has a harder time freezing than a smaller tank. And a person can get their own fire supression water pump and hoses that hooks into it as well for a reasonalbe figure too.

    William