Moving a building

Discussion in 'Shop Talk' started by Ross, Sep 21, 2005.

  1. Ross

    Ross Moderator Staff Member Supporter

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    I've found what I think is a terrifiic deal on a 24X30 steel clad pole barn/ shed. Very well made screwed on tin and well finished (corners eves etc.) . $2000 CND buys it as is where is. It's about 5 miles north of me and its all rural roads driving. Plan A is to pull off the roof into its component trusses tin purlins etc. leave the end walls entact and drop them on a flat bed wagon, but it's going to be over width (yes I have two 25 foot wagons) . I'll look into permits and insurance. One wall is sliding doors the other I'd break in 2 and bring in as 2 peices. Rebuild with a sill plate added onto the bottom of the posts perhaps an added 6x6 where needed and dropped onto a slab foundation of sorts or?? Anyone done this or similar? Any tips or advice?
     
  2. cfabe

    cfabe Well-Known Member

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    I have not done this but my gut instinct is that a pole building (if it really is a pole building) would not strong enough to transport on it's own, espicially with the roof removed. A lot of the strength of a pole building comes from the poles being buried in the ground.
     

  3. Blu3duk

    Blu3duk Well-Known Member

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    What type of sheathing does the wal have? plywood? framing lumber? if FL what are the centers measurement?

    If there isnt any ovehead wires betwixt yer place and the building.... load the whole thing onto a trailer and pull it home just after daylight strikes.... been folks around here that do that way more often than a person would believe, although mostly all are houses with full floors so the joists rest on cross timbers on the trailer.... pulled with an old dump truck slowly....

    but as far as over hanging on a trailer the same applys laying the wall flat, have a supportthat isnt already attached to the wall to hold er up and take off a daybreak and pul it home.... permission..... i personally give you permission to do this!!! however i suppose if you ask the local jurisdiction they probably will actually sign the permission slip and you might avoid a hefty fine..... its hard growing up rebelious though... asking permission seems like someone has the right to tell me nope you cant do that..... cause they didnt think of it first.

    William
     
  4. Bret F

    Bret F Well-Known Member

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    I bought a 25' X 44' steel - pole building at an auciton. A friend of mine was also interested in it, but just the costs of the permits to move it whole scared him off.

    About six of us hit it on a Saturday morning and totally dismanted it and loaded it on trailers in about 4 hours. Before taking it apart, my wife went around and took good pictures, and numbered all the panels.

    I put it back up at my house in about a week and a half, while working my job 10 hrs per day.
     
  5. Ross

    Ross Moderator Staff Member Supporter

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    Yes strength will be an issue, I'll have to add more inside support via 2x6's i guess. It is well braced but the ground is helping alot I realize! Its not sheathed inside. Can't move it intact, far too many over head wires! Permission............. oh yeah it burns my butt to have to ask however I don't own the road and want everything lined up so if the proceedure causes an accident everyone is covered. Me from financial ruin and anyone hurt from not enough to pay for recovery/lifetime support. It ain't worth it if someone's hurt! Got a call into my insurance agent now, he's top notch as he's been a farmer, hunting guide and outfitter, and still is an all round great guy.
     
  6. michiganfarmer

    michiganfarmer Max Supporter

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    only 5 miles away? move it early on a sunday morning when noone is on the raod, and have someone folow you with their 4 ways on
     
  7. agmantoo

    agmantoo agmantoo Supporter

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    Ross,
    The building will be much easier moved and less damage incurred if you totally disassemble it. I actually think you will have less work and I know you will have less aggravation in so doing. Just identify each piece so that you can reassemble the building exactly as it was standing prior to the disassembly. You will be able to reuse the preexisting holes and have no leaks. Be safe!
     
  8. Ross

    Ross Moderator Staff Member Supporter

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    Yeah that was my final thought on the move to disassemble it but the roof turned out to be nailed on not screwed so to the corners and soffits. I thought by the time I managed to pull all those nails and replace the damaged peices I wasn't going saving much. If I start from scratch I'll get what I want for abont 25% more than this thing plus rebuilding/redesigning costs. Yeah that's still around $3000 more. I'm in no rush to miss something great, and this came close, but I'll pass. Thanks for the ideas though!
     
  9. Cosmic

    Cosmic Well-Known Member

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    I have moved my share of things, including buildings and sheds. Am right now in the process of moving a heavy 16' x 9' shed made of oak. I did a total disassembly on this one.

    Usually these projects boil down to what is the materials worth and what are you saving by buying the entire building?? Unless you get it for a super saving, like in many cases, just about free, it ain't worth it. I already owned the shed, just relocating it. Did not come apart as easy as I had hoped for, talking some massive force required in some areas. Had to call on Percy, as in Percy Sledge for some gentle persuasion on too many ocassions. You never get the details right. :stars:

    The advice about numbering or putting an ID on parts is critical, especially if you want to reassemble back into its original form. Even if you don't using a marking system is still required. I am not rebuilding this shed as the original but still need to know the order parts came off for areas like decking, roof boards, etc.

    I have found it best to tear things down into their component parts. You always misguess how much something is going to weigh, plus many assemblies don't have enough strength in a partial form, you damage pieces in the move.

    My rebuild of this shed has kicked off a lot of interest in the neighborhood. Now lots of people want a shed. Duh, they know where one is that can be moved. Just not that easy without a good prior study. You must decide if it is beefy enough to withstand the move as an entire structure. Many can not, the framing gets distorted, or the entire thing racks, doors no longer shut properly. :bash:

    I have been involved with moving entire structures but it was never easy. Lots of planning involved, especially on how to lift it, brace if needed and how to get it back down on to a new foundation. Most of the moves went well, if planned properly. Can't survey the problem enough. Some had some nasty surprises. Like the nails used where only 3-1/2" shot in with nail guns. Not enough holding power for a one piece move. Beware of going over rough ground, especially at the wrong speeds, the route is critical for many reasons. You can't tie it down enough from all angles. Many times you must add additional bracing within the structure before ever attempting to lift or move it. A good survey and rough drawing with dimensions is also a must. If it is already distorted, it may have to be put back into position in that manner.