mountain land

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by Unregistered-1427815803, Aug 23, 2004.

  1. My husband and I are in the planning stages for relocating to a rural life. We plan on 3-5 years to make the move (we have young kids so, we need to do it responsibly). We are looking for ideas on areas to look for land. Great motorcyle roads are important (for hubby). Cool Mountain air (valleys will be too warm to live in, but will do for errands). I plan on having a large veggie garden (so good land is a must). I already garden and love to grow everything fresh. I do have lots of allergies, but I have them here (local honey does help a bit). Schools are important, but would home-school if necessary - i would prefer for kids to be able to mix with other kids. The MOST important thing is that there NOT be a ton of people. I like open green pasture with woods on land also. I want a view so I can sit on my back porch and look at it (atleast for my morning coffee)-something to replace the ocean. I DO NOT want a development. No sense to leave our neighborhood and current situation to do the same thing somewhere else.

    Where we live on the eastcoast there are 41,000 people in a 15 sq. mile radius (our suburban city). It is beautiful here, BUT, very expensive and people are just in too much of a rush and ALWAYS on their cell phones. We feel like we don't fit in. People think I'm crazy that I make all baked goods in my house from scratch, my own yogurt, soap etc. I plan on this fall to work on a soap business project (product design stage). I did think about having some type of baking business and provide to businesses, but the laws here are very strict and you cannot make baked items to sell in your home kitchen.

    Hubby is an electrical engineer and works 5 min. from home so he is still figuring out what he wants to do when we move rural. He would like to have a small business, but not storefront.

    Any ideas on where to look for that land, would be helpful.

    Thanks

    b
     
  2. perennial

    perennial Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,262
    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2004
    Location:
    Virginia
    I'm new here and that's my post above. Also, our other option is to wait until kids are done w/school here and then do the big move.
     

  3. gobug

    gobug Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    1,274
    Joined:
    Dec 9, 2003
    Location:
    Colorado
    I know there has been a lot of negativity about Colorado voiced here, but I love it. I bought land near the Royal Gorge at the end of '03 and intend to build a homestead there. The area is quite rural and there is a lot of land for sale. The average price is about $2500 per acre for the land.

    I found my property on the web. Here's a link:

    http://www.custerguide.com/home.asp

    The link to real estate ads is located right below the picture at top center.
    good luck
     
  4. fordy

    fordy Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    9,266
    Joined:
    Sep 13, 2003
    Location:
    Whiskey Flats(Ft. Worth) , Tx
    ................gobug\unreg. , my problem with colo , is that while land is available at a reasonable price the Zoning , i.e. the complete control and management of what KIND\style of home that I want to build on MY land is NOT MY decision . Property taxes , state income taxes , cost of septic, cost of water well , etc . just TOO onerous for my liking . I love the mountains and Topography of Colorado , and would love to live there but there is just too much control ......fordy.... :eek: :)
     
  5. perennial

    perennial Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,262
    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2004
    Location:
    Virginia
    where I live, the real estate tax rate is 10.92 and is going to go up in 2005. The sales tax is 5% and income is 5.95.

    How is the real estate tax in colorado? The sales tax was something!

    brural
     
  6. perennial

    perennial Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,262
    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2004
    Location:
    Virginia
    I will say that pictures of properties and land on line were gorgeous!

    brural
     
  7. gobug

    gobug Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    1,274
    Joined:
    Dec 9, 2003
    Location:
    Colorado
    Real estate taxes on the land I just bought, 14 acres appraised at $53K, are $260 per year. Sales taxes near Denver are around 7% depending on the specific location. I'm not sure what sales taxes are in the area where I purchased land. Taxes on my Denver home are about the same %.

    I think the USA is quickly moving towards more regulation in rural areas. The population is growing so fast that many people want or must look in rural areas to buy. This not a Colorado phenomenon.

    I don't need a permit for an outbuilding or animal shelter. The county uses IRC2003 for new construction. Unfortunately, it has nothing about thin shell concrete, which I plan to use for construction. While this may complicate the permit process, I am told the building inspector in my new county is very easy to deal with. I fully expect to build something like they have never seen before.

    I have called many officials in the county to find out rules for building on my property. I have always given them my name and the new address. In eight months, not one official has come to the property to see what I am doing. Although technically illegal, neighbors on both sides have composting toilets and collect runoff water. Both have lived on the property for more than 5 years without harrassment from the county. I will collect runoff water for gardening.

    I think one reason a lot of property is for sale in the area is that the job market is poor. I haven't looked for a job in the area.
     
  8. gobug

    gobug Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    1,274
    Joined:
    Dec 9, 2003
    Location:
    Colorado
    One other thing, I am convinced the climate will support year round gardening (as in Eliot Coleman style). I spent every other weekend on the property without heat or electricity since January 1. Although night time temperatures dropped to single digits in January/February a few times, day time temps got up to the 70's. I put a little battery operated weather station on the property so I could get a good history of weather.
     
  9. Cyngbaeld

    Cyngbaeld In Remembrance Supporter

    Messages:
    28,248
    Joined:
    May 20, 2004
    Location:
    SE Missouri
    Property tax in colorado varies wildly according to where you live. (Just moved from there.) I do know of some land for sale very cheap, BUT hard to find work and will have to drive far to reach anything. If you want remote land in colorado you can pm me and I'll put you in touch with someone out there. Rugged country tho and not for everyone.
     
  10. perennial

    perennial Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,262
    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2004
    Location:
    Virginia
    gobug,

    where abouts in colorado is that area so I can look on a map.

    It depends on when we make the move as to what area.

    If it is w/kids in school, we would need hopefully some type of hospital with a decent distance and schools (i don't mind driving to/from school).

    We are still figuring out what we want both with kids in school and after they graduate school.

    I love small towns, but want to live in the hills outside of one. I like the weather you mentioned. Was there much snow?

    We had the coldest winter in a very long time here. It was below zero many days and bitterly cold with no snow. We got 3 feet in one storm that shut our city down for four days. Then after that freak snow storm, there was nothing else! Our summers here I consider HOT, others do not, but then of course, I'm not one to sit on a beach for hours. Cool and dry with seasonal changes is what i'm looking for.

    thanks for all your input

    brural
     
  11. daileyjoy

    daileyjoy Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    350
    Joined:
    May 2, 2003
    Ya might want to reconsider Colordo there was a post eariler about how hard it was to live there with all the restrictions about this and that. I think it was under the outhouse post.

    jennifer
     
  12. perennial

    perennial Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,262
    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2004
    Location:
    Virginia
    I'm researching at this point. Any ideas about places that might be suitable are atleast worth checking out on hte net. I have a wish list of my "requirements" and I'm trying to come up with a few ideas.

    We are seriously considering the mountains of virginia near the Blue Ridge Parkway - my hubby LOVES riding there. He was just there in June and said the mountains were nice and cool, but the valleys were hot. I would live in the mountains. Mountains of NC are also an idea. Read a little about Wyoming, but it snows until June and then starts again in August. Maine, which is on our coast, is expensive if you want to be on the ocean.

    I have alot of research to do before I would even spend the $$ to go to a place to check it out with my own eyes.

    Any input is welcome.

    brural
     
  13. Mudwoman

    Mudwoman Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    528
    Joined:
    Dec 18, 2002
    Go on line and look at water issues in certain states, especially in the west. Without water, you have nothing.

    Next, since you have some time, I suggest taking a map and making a circle from where you currently live of about 300 miles in any one direction.

    Then start doing some weekend trips to various areas and look around. If you find nothing, then select another area and try and do the same. The advantage of the 300 mile radius is that it is possible to spend weekends on your place and keep your job and place in town while you make improvements and enjoy it.
     
  14. perennial

    perennial Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,262
    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2004
    Location:
    Virginia
    thanks for all your ideas.

    brural
     
  15. Hoop

    Hoop Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    799
    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2003
    Location:
    Northern Wisconsin
    First of all, let me say that I enjoy living in Wisconsin and have no plans to move anywhere.

    My choice for a really terrific place to live is the Black Hills of South Dakota. It unquestionably, has some of the best motorcycle riding in the US.

    The Black Hills, however has seen developement grow by leaps & bounds over the last decade. There are still areas off the beaten path that are the "road less traveled".
    Finding inexpensive potable water is a problem in some of the areas of the Black Hills. Be sure to refrain from purchasing property that doesn't include water rights.

    Actually, the area outside the Black Hills is mostly barren plain. This is where the land is fairly inexpensive, and the neighbors are far apart.
     
  16. gobug

    gobug Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    1,274
    Joined:
    Dec 9, 2003
    Location:
    Colorado
    The general area covered by the website I posted is Cotopaxi, Texas Creek, Westcliffe, Salida, and Canon City. As you head south on I-25, you take 115 from Colorado Springs toward Canon City. It intersects highway 50 which runs through Canon City up to Salida. This is the Arkansas river valley, the Wet Mountains, and the eastern side of the Sangre De Cristo's. The area south of highway 50 includes some of Fremont county and goes into Custer County. The area has a little more precipitation than the Denver area and the annual degree days are higher. Most of the precipitation occurs in a few heavy downpours or snow storms. This year it has usually been a little cooler than Denver during the summer and was about the same as Denver through the winter. I read the Canon City area thrifty nickle type adds this weekend. There were chickens, goats, pigs for sale and other indications of homesteader types living in the immediate area. Some neighborhoods are 2.5 acre plots; some go to 40 acres minimum. The area has a lot of recreation and would be a good family trip to check out.

    While on-line information about water may be usefull, individual properties may not reflect the averaged information you will find. For example, it may be nearly impossible to get a new well permit allowing agricultural use on small acreage, yet you may be able to buy an existing one. The same goes for surface water rights.

    There are so many beautiful areas in this wide country, you are smart to start checking them out to find what suits you best. Beware, though, you'll find the property you love before you think you're ready and able to buy it.
     
  17. Hank - Narita

    Hank - Narita Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    960
    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2002
    Have you considered Arizona? Land is cheap; mountains are close; schools are OK. Jobs are scarce though. Email me at hsnrs@vtc.net for examples of land and prices near us in zone 8.
     
  18. perennial

    perennial Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,262
    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2004
    Location:
    Virginia
    I think Arizona will be too hot for me - I'm so glad that fall is coming here in Massachusetts. It's been in the 50's at night and today won't go above 72. That's perfect weather!

    thanks again for any and all suggestions.

    brural