Most effective place to shoot a goat?

Discussion in 'Goats' started by frank4570, Oct 6, 2005.

  1. frank4570

    frank4570 Active Member

    Messages:
    39
    Joined:
    Aug 17, 2003
    I have a goat I need to put down. I would like either a diagram of goat anatomy or good detailed instructions on where to shoot her.She is old and now getting lame and winter is comming on now.
    Thanks.
     
  2. moosemaniac

    moosemaniac Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,662
    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2003
    Location:
    North East, PA in Northwestern PA
    I've always been taught in the head, preferably between the eyes. Now I could be wrong, but it sure seems like that would be the most painless place.

    Ruth
     

  3. Michael W. Smith

    Michael W. Smith Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    6,126
    Joined:
    Jun 2, 2002
    Yep, in the head. When the butcher would come, that is what he did. A shot to the head and they drop like a rock. Sometimes they kick around (nerves) and sometimes they don't.

    Sorry that you have to put yours down. How old is she? My oldest must be going on 10 now, and so far, she gets along fine. I always hoped I would go out to the pen someday and find her dead - I would hate to have to put her down, but if quality of life isn't quality, then you do have to be a responsible animal owner.
     
    Sonshine likes this.
  4. Michael Leferink

    Michael Leferink Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    281
    Joined:
    Jul 12, 2003
    Location:
    Louisiana
    I am very sorry. I have had to put down a number of animals and it's never something I look forward to doing.

    I do it one of three ways:

    1) Place the bullet at a spot slightly above "between the eyes". The path of the bullet should be through the brain and into/out of the throat.

    2) Base of the skull, just above the join of the skull and neck. The bullet should pass through the brain at an angle and exit between the jaw bones.

    3) Between the eye and the ear. The bullet should pass through the brain and exit at about the same point on the other side.


    Any of these should produce immediate death. If there is any doubt, shoot again. There will be blood and the animal will twitch and maybe jump. This is just the nerves firing random impulses. There may be escaping air from the lungs. Your animal will not be alive and it will not be feeling anything.

    I do not suggest using a .22RF. I know a lot of people use this caliber to put down their animals with no problem. However, any bullet can and will glance off of hard bone (skull). The lighter the bullet, the more likely this will happen. Be sure your bullet hits square to reduce the chance of this happening and I would use something bigger than a .22RF if I had it. Please be careful. I'm sure you will be, but this can be a very emotional thing for some folks and emotions have a way of allowing us to forget the basic safety rules.

    Again, very sorry.

    MikeL
     
  5. mpillow

    mpillow Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    9,569
    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2003
    Location:
    CHINA
    where the base of skull meets the neck.....goats are thick headed for butting purposes so between the eyes is not so good a place.

    Thank you for being merciful to your animal.
     
    farmmom likes this.
  6. Gailann Schrader

    Gailann Schrader Green Woman

    Messages:
    1,957
    Joined:
    May 10, 2002
    Location:
    Indiana - North Central
    mpillow has it dead on. I've had trouble with the "between the eyes" method. FIRST, they are looking at you and know something is up. SECOND, the round tends to not penetrate properly and doesn't bounce around scrambling everything. You aren't hitting the brain stem, stopping basic functions. They tend to scream and try to run, so if you use that method? Tie them up or they run around like chickens do when you remove their head...

    The behind the head at the groove base of the skull at an angle into the cranium works VERY well. Take her out away from the other stock, give her some grain to eat (on the ground) and then shoot her into that groove when she's peacefully eating. Scrambles the brains pretty well. The frontal lobe will still tend to have some structure, but you will destroy the brain stem. It's called Execution Style. Slashing the throat after they are down will stop functions more quickly too. She will pretty much be senseless after the shot.

    Good luck.
     
  7. Goat Freak

    Goat Freak Slave To Many Animals

    Messages:
    1,970
    Joined:
    Jul 6, 2005
    Location:
    Florida
    Just wanted to say sorry that you have to put her down, at least she had a good life.
     
  8. frank4570

    frank4570 Active Member

    Messages:
    39
    Joined:
    Aug 17, 2003
    Thanks fro the responses. She is at least 7 years old.She is easily the sweetest goat we have.She is really more like a pet.I am not looking forward to this, but I want to be sure to do it right. Letting her go into the cold winter with her swolen knees would be cruel.
     
  9. tinetine'sgoat

    tinetine'sgoat Luvin' my family in MO

    Messages:
    2,165
    Joined:
    Aug 4, 2005
    Location:
    Missouri
    Have you checked with your vet as to how much it would cost to have her put down? Some of them will do it for little or nothing and it will save you the emotional trauma of killing her. I agree that a .22 would not be a good choice of guns. My opinion is that you shouldn't shoot between the eyes, the skull plate is thick in that area. My dad when putting down a diseased cow went either under the jaw back into the brain cavity or the ear angled down so that the bullet would exit above the jaw line on the other side. These are just my .02. I'll say a prayer for you, best to you all and God bless a goat life well lived!!
     
  10. frank4570

    frank4570 Active Member

    Messages:
    39
    Joined:
    Aug 17, 2003
    I'm not going to bring a vet out here for this. I think in reality shooting is less traumatic for the goat, if done properly. And the .22 is not an issue since I don't have one. I carry a 10mm so that is what I will use. Thanks for the concerned replies, this will not be the first animal I have had to put down.It is just a bit more difficult for animals I am fond of.
     
  11. ozark_jewels

    ozark_jewels Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    9,246
    Joined:
    Oct 6, 2005
    Location:
    Missouri
    Yes, The BEST place is behind the head at an angle toward the lower jaw. Between the eyes is a BAD idea for goats or sheep because of the extra thick skull plate there. I butcher all my freezer goats using this method and have put down one doe using it. It is a good way to do it. So sorry she has to go......
     
  12. Laura Workman

    Laura Workman (formerly Laura Jensen) Supporter

    Messages:
    2,479
    Joined:
    May 10, 2002
    Location:
    Lynnwood, Washington
    OK, so you shoot where the base of the skull meets the neck, in the back center, I presume. Where do you aim for the bullet to exit? Not that it will exit, I just want to get the right angle for the path now that we've zeroed in on the point of entry. (Yes, I have a little killing to do as well. With a .22. And I'm nervous about it.)
     
  13. HunterTed

    HunterTed Rockin B Farm

    Messages:
    154
    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2005
    Location:
    Texas
    Unless you are an accomplished shooter I would do it at VERY CLOSE range ESPECIALLY WITH A .22. Just keep the gun level so that the bullet will go through the base of the neck. But if you can borrow/use something bigger than a .22 I would reccommend it. Shot a few animals at the base of the skull with a .22 (all I had handy at the time) and they kicked and thrashed around for a few seconds. Seeing this might upset some people.
     
  14. ozark_jewels

    ozark_jewels Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    9,246
    Joined:
    Oct 6, 2005
    Location:
    Missouri
    Ok, lets see if I can get a picture here.......
    [​IMG]
    This is the angle I use to do all my killing. I butcher a lot of goats and have never had this method fail. They drop straight down and except for a few reflex movements are still. Reflex movements are natural after the animal is dead.
     
    rediranch likes this.
  15. Laura Workman

    Laura Workman (formerly Laura Jensen) Supporter

    Messages:
    2,479
    Joined:
    May 10, 2002
    Location:
    Lynnwood, Washington
    Thank you so much!!! Nothing like a picture to clear things up!
     
  16. moosemaniac

    moosemaniac Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,662
    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2003
    Location:
    North East, PA in Northwestern PA
    Just don't show the picture to the goat! :help:

    Ruth
     
  17. TexCountryWoman

    TexCountryWoman Gig'em

    Messages:
    1,198
    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2004
    Location:
    Lexington Texas area
    I agree you should not have the vet do it. It would cause the animal emotional trauma. I have to have the abuility to put down large animals (equines, bovines) also so I use a 12 gauge shot gun with a slug. Last week, my 14 year old Aussie was run over and his back was broken and I had to shoot him with that shot gun. He was deaf, had only one good leg, no teeth and was missing half his bottom jaw...BEFORE he got run over. He served a good hard-working life...and always smiled. I had to shoot him and still haven't been able to cry....when I do, I won't stop. Shot guns are rough, but they work better than anything I know.
     
  18. frank4570

    frank4570 Active Member

    Messages:
    39
    Joined:
    Aug 17, 2003
    I know what you mean.Life can be rough sometimes.
     
  19. Michael Leferink

    Michael Leferink Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    281
    Joined:
    Jul 12, 2003
    Location:
    Louisiana
    No offense is intended to ozark_jewels. I'm sure the purpose of the picture is only to show the proper angle for the shot. Just want to warn folks not to place their off hand in the position seen in the picture (under the neck). It is hoped that a bullet will travel straight through a target, but such is not always the case. Bullets will sometimes do strange and unexpected things once they hit something. In the position shown in the picture, I would not be surprised if the left hand was struck by a deflected shot. I have seen bullets enter and then turn at all kinds of angles, including back toward the shooter. And there is the danger of bullet/bone fragments. Also, I would not shoot any animal while holding it between my knees. With the shot placement shown in the picture, the goat would most likely go straight down. But sometimes an animal will jump straight up when shot. I would give the goat something to hold it's attention (food). I would stand along side of the goat, just behind the shoulder. When the goat lowers it's head to eat, I would move the muzzle to within 6" but not less than 2" of the intended point of impact and shoot.

    Again, no offense is intended and I don't mean to second guess anyone. Just don't want to see anyone get hurt.

    MikeL
     
  20. ozark_jewels

    ozark_jewels Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    9,246
    Joined:
    Oct 6, 2005
    Location:
    Missouri
    Yes, you are right. The picture was only meant to illustrate the angle. The gun was not loaded. Safety first, folks.
    As for holding the goat between my knees....I will say that in all the goats I have killed using that method(over 40), none have ever done anything but fall straight down. I have never seen a goat shot at that angle that didn't go straight down. I have tried the feed or loosely tying the goat and have gone back to holding them. My butcher goats are preferably wild and that seems to be the only sure-fire way of getting a clean shot. They have just too much free movement any other way. They also don't get stressed out like they do when they are fighting a rope. Now if the goat is tame, shooting is easy. But I do my best NOT to have to butcher tame goats. I get way too attached.................=( So, whatever method of restraint works best for you.....Of course if you are putting down a sick goat, its unlikely you'll have to worry about them jumping around.