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This morning it was 55 in the bedroom (perfect for me) and 67 in the living room where the wood stove is. I almost can't say how much i enjoy stoking the fire in the A.M. sitting my coffee mug on top of the stove to keep hot while cleaning up ash, and selecting just the right sized and species of wood to hold the fire all day. Its nearly a science, passion, and privilege all wrapped up in one.

Last evening I put my pan of homemade chicken soup left over from Monday on the stove to gently heat while i did a little house work, I had piping hot soup in about 20 minutes, microwave free! This morning I had huge coals left over from a nice hunk of Osage Orange I banked up over Maple coals last night. Fire is so simple, so fulfilling, and so grounding. It requires common sense, and time to do the wood chores associated with it. I'm kind of sad for folks that have never experienced the simple joy of heat that penetrates to your bones. Now I'm thinking of adding a member to my pack as in a dog or cat, to share the heat, the couch and my home with. I haven't had a pal in a few years.

Lets have a discussion and share stories about the perks, and experiences you have had living, feeding, and enjoying your wood stove, pics. of pets enjoying the hearth heat gets lots of extra points!!!:thumb:
 

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I love wood heat, but have to say that having to make a fire is getting to feel a bit like work after it being my primary heat for most of the last 25 years. Once its going, I love it. I also love the smell of the woodsmoke, the pine in particular, and miss the smell of the Juniper we used in Az (often called cedar). Dealing with cleaning the ash and the stovepipe isn't high up on my enjoyment list.

I have on old wood kitchen range I want to set up either as a summer stove on the porch, or if/when I get to build a larger cabin one day, it will be in the kitchen, along with an old 1920's gas stove I also have.

I have way more stove than I need for my little cabin. Even on the below zero nights, I never need to load more than half its capacity to get al night heat, and Pine is fine for that use. It will be fine when I add on to this one, or in the future larger cabin.

For those that haven't tried it, I came across something several years ago, they called it an upside down fire. All the big wood is laid tightly together on the bottom, medium stuff tightly on top of that, and a starter fire built on top. Its not what we were told how the "right" way to build a fire is, however, its a concept that's been around for ages, and more to the point, it works. I used to have to reload my woodstove in the middle of the night when using the "right" way of building a fire, using space between the wood so it can "breathe" etc. Now, even with scraps from construction, like 2x6 pieces, or the mill slabs I use now, I can get an all day or night fire. I haven't done it any other way in several years, it simply works much better.

Can barely see my woodstove, a Blaze King. Great stove!

 

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Malamute- love the gun collection behind the stove.

I love my wood stove for heating my home. We moved it to our basement this year and my DH is missing having it in the living room.

As a kid I always enjoyed sitting in the floor in front of the wood stove at my grandparents. I remember getting on the school bus one morning and having another kid ask if I had been smoking. I never even noticed smelling like the wood smoke. Oh well, I guess those kids just never got the privilege of having breakfast next to a warm fire. Even at 34 years old I love sitting next to the fire. I just prefer sitting in my rocker now! 😀
 

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Everyone's places look so cozy. That's what wood heat is, to me -- instant coziness. :)

I shared a pic recently of my family room with the wood burner blazing away, can't recall which thread, though. So I'll just post another one. :)





Looks a lot like that today, too.
 

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Oh I have missed my woodstove these past months.
Along about October I'm up to my neck with the last of getting ready for winter and can hardly wait to kick back in front of the fire, eat up all that good food & drink up all that fine wine I've been putting up.
No snow yet but it's definitely cold enough to dream in front of a warm fire.
 

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I'm likin those pistolas myself, Malamute. Good lookin leather too.
 

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A great picture, Malamute!

Not takng a picture of my earth stove. It's been around for close to twenty years, and still burning well. I've got a propane furnace as well, but it hasn't been on since the X left 11 years ago. She seemingly hated wood heat...or just wouldn't feed the fire to keep it going while she huddled in a blanket on the couch. No matter now, though. :)

You mentioned burning pine. I like it as well. Good quick heat, and I can load this big doored/big firebox stove up, and have good heat most all night. Pine doesn't leave much for ashes either. Oh yeah...there were times I burned nothing but cedar/juniper and pinon. Hard to beat cedar for a fast hot fire. We had a dual fuel cookstove when I was a kid, and cedar was a good wood to make the morn fire for breakfast!

I don't care much for the ash disposal either. I have to dip them out with an ash shovel with this stove, door does come off, so you empty right into the bucket, and a lot of dust is sucked back up the pipe. Still, I generally miss the bucket a little, or try to get to much into it...and I'm not very handy at dusting things.

I'm really not liking this below zero weather either! I hate feeding the stove this much wood for this time of the year! This is late December/January weather for this area.

lQUOTE=Malamute;7283558]I love wood heat, but have to say that having to make a fire is getting to feel a bit like work after it being my primary heat for most of the last 25 years. Once its going, I love it. I also love the smell of the woodsmoke, the pine in particular, and miss the smell of the Juniper we used in Az (often called cedar). Dealing with cleaning the ash and the stovepipe isn't high up on my enjoyment list.

I have on old wood kitchen range I want to set up either as a summer stove on the porch, or if/when I get to build a larger cabin one day, it will be in the kitchen, along with an old 1920's gas stove I also have.

I have way more stove than I need for my little cabin. Even on the below zero nights, I never need to load more than half its capacity to get al night heat, and Pine is fine for that use. It will be fine when I add on to this one, or in the future larger cabin.

For those that haven't tried it, I came across something several years ago, they called it an upside down fire. All the big wood is laid tightly together on the bottom, medium stuff tightly on top of that, and a starter fire built on top. Its not what we were told how the "right" way to build a fire is, however, its a concept that's been around for ages, and more to the point, it works. I used to have to reload my woodstove in the middle of the night when using the "right" way of building a fire, using space between the wood so it can "breathe" etc. Now, even with scraps from construction, like 2x6 pieces, or the mill slabs I use now, I can get an all day or night fire. I haven't done it any other way in several years, it simply works much better.

Can barely see my woodstove, a Blaze King. Great stove!

[/QUOTE]
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Thanks to everybody who has contributed to this thread, Tom especially thanks for including "the pack"! I'd share a cup of coffee with a "wee bit o schnapps" in the evening hours with any of you all! I enjoyed the firepower and leather photo. Made me feel right at home, as most folks freak a little when enter my home, (few do) I always get asked about the 50 cal Hawkins and the 50 cal. Tennessee long rifles leaning up against the fireplace mantle. Yes, they are real, yes I really do shoot them, yes you can pick them up, yes we can just go shoot one right however there is far too much clean up involved to just shoot once. Now to knock a Whitetail off his feet, well that's a whole different answer! Only takes one.... LOLOL
 

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Discussion Starter #15
18* outside today, snowflakes as large as quarters falling straight down from the sky, zero wind! That rarely happens here. Wood stove is pumping out serious heat, coffee carafe is sitting on stove staying warm. Just need a puppy on my lap and a woman snuggling on my shoulder! LOLOL :kiss: Plenty of wood in the wood box so no reason to go outside unless I decide to. Dad had a good night last evening, all in all a pretty good day shaping up.
 

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Now I am curious about something. A co worker (since quit) heated with wood and her clothes always smelled of smoke. Not so much her uniform but her jackets. It got so bad we had to ask her to not have her jacket in the break room (which is also in our department) because it would give us headaches. It wasn't a pleasant smell but definately was from wood. At first I thought it was because she smoked but my boss said it was a wood smell not tabacco. Is this normal?
 

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Now I am curious about something. A co worker (since quit) heated with wood and her clothes always smelled of smoke. Not so much her uniform but her jackets. It got so bad we had to ask her to not have her jacket in the break room (which is also in our department) because it would give us headaches. It wasn't a pleasant smell but definately was from wood. At first I thought it was because she smoked but my boss said it was a wood smell not tabacco. Is this normal?
Sounds like she was burning leaves or brush outside and wore her jacket when doing it. A faint smell of burning wood in a wood heated home would not be unheard of but usually if it is a good appliance installation the wood smell is very minor and usually only cause by opening the door too quickly to load the stove. Easy to cure, dont open door fast! :thumb: My scrubs don't smell of wood smoke.
 

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Now I am curious about something. A co worker (since quit) heated with wood and her clothes always smelled of smoke. Not so much her uniform but her jackets. It got so bad we had to ask her to not have her jacket in the break room (which is also in our department) because it would give us headaches. It wasn't a pleasant smell but definately was from wood. At first I thought it was because she smoked but my boss said it was a wood smell not tabacco. Is this normal?
I would say that most of us who burn wood, don't notice much/any smoke smell on our clothing. Some folks are allergic to wood smoke, but I wouldn't think it likely that everyone in your workplace was allergic. It's possible she was using a stove that wasn't sealed or ventilated well and leaked an excessive amount of smoke into the house. Or maybe she just needed to wash her coat more often.
 

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Maybe a fireplace instead of stove, maybe outdoor cookfire, I get strong smoke smell when I build a fire in the grill, and it doesn't take much smoke to do it.
 

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Thanks for the replies. I don't have a wood stove and am envious of those that do. I just have electric heat and a propane wall heater for back up. I always said my co worker must have been burning brush along with because the smell of wood was so strong. There are other people that have wood stoves and I have never noticed a smell on anything they wear however I have noticed when I burn leaves and branches my clothes do pick up a strong smell from it.
 
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