More wood stove questions

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by almostthere, Oct 19, 2005.

  1. almostthere

    almostthere Well-Known Member

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    Maybe there should be a forum just for wood stoves, LOL. :D

    Anyway, I posted some time ago about my Fisher Honey Bear we got from a friend. The damper is in the form of a metal rod under the plate under the glass doors that opens a "hatch" behind the pedestal. Would a damper on the pipe itself be a good idea? The pipe is double wall, bought new.
     
  2. michiganfarmer

    michiganfarmer Max Supporter

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    I dont know anything about the brand of wood stove you have but I have been heating exclusively with wood all my married life, and dad heated exclusively with wood all the time I was growing up. Why do you want to know about a damper? Is your stove burning to hot?
     

  3. almostthere

    almostthere Well-Known Member

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    We havent ran it yet. We just installed it this weekend and today put it on the insurance. But all the articles I have been reading have been refering to a damper in the pipe. Im all for putting a fan in the room to keep the air moving...want to make sure I have all the bases covered before we fire it up.
     
  4. stanb999

    stanb999 Well-Known Member

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    You have to contact the manufacturer. With Some stoves a damper is not used. these are the newer "air tight" models. If this is an old leaky stove then a damper IS required. I hope this helps. :)
     
  5. Arborethic

    Arborethic Well-Known Member

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    As I understand it, the upper pipe damper holds some risk if used when there is a fire or coals present. It can result in forcing carbon monoxide out of the stove. We never closed our upper damper except when the fire and coals were totally gone. I could be wrong, but that is what an old timer that sold me my first Ben Franklin stove 35 years ago told me.
     
  6. michiganfarmer

    michiganfarmer Max Supporter

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    A damper is used to reduce the amount of air getting to the fire, and the amount of heat just loss up the chimney. A the same time it increases burn time by reducing wood consumtion. Dad had a damper in our old wood stove that was in the living room. he would fill the stove before bed, and shut the damper right off. The damper wasnt a tight fit in the pipe so it allowed some air movement, and the draw on the chimney kept the smoke going in the right direction. I beleive some sort of damper is required in all wood burning heaters. You should check with the manufacturer if you arent comfortable dong what I would do. I would start a fire in it on a day when I wasnt at work, and watch it closely all day. Play with the existing damper. Let it burn with the damper wide open. Close the damper and see if the fire calms down. Experiment with it while you are home all day and can watch it closely. You might find a neighbor how has heated with wood for a long time and have them check it out.
     
  7. almostthere

    almostthere Well-Known Member

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    Yes thats what we plan on doing, lighting it up when we're both here. I'm here all day and he's here at night so it wont ever go unchecked.
     
  8. Cabin Fever

    Cabin Fever Life NRA Member since 1976 Supporter

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    SInce your stove already has a method to adjust the air entering the firebox, you do not need a damper. The function of a damper is to control the amount of air entering a firebox...kinda like a "jake brake" on a semi-truck. As Stan said, airtight stoves do not need dampers. The reason is they all have a means of controlling air flow built right into the firebox.
     
  9. almostthere

    almostthere Well-Known Member

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    We ran her last night, no leaks. We installed another smoke alarm in that room. Went outside to check the outside pipe. Then it rained, no problems. So happy. It was nice and warm, put me right to sleep. It was sort of like a warm soft heat. With half a load and a fan it was warm all the way back to the bedrooms, and the heater never kicked on. Thanks so much for advice and info. Especially about the damper, I was really worried about that.
     
  10. sidepasser

    sidepasser Well-Known Member

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    I have a fisher big bear non airtight (love these) wood stove and have the chimney pipe. I have a damper 12 inches above the top of the stove (measured from where the pipe fits on the stove) and above that I have a fan (electric) made for wood stoves. I heat totally with wood, my house is around 2500 square feet, give or take a hundred feet or so, high ceilings 14 feet at the peak, 10 feet at the walls. I use ceiling fans to direct the heat downward in the winter and use the blower on the stove pipe to capture the heat going up the chimney.

    My new system has been in use since early last winter and it heats the whole house now, burns less wood and is much more efficient all around. Just don't close the damper all the way shut and remember, air has to flow in at the bottom and go up the pipe, so leave the bottom open a bit and the damper open a bit (adjust as necessary to keep fire going, but not roaring) and it's fine. I find that using the damper keeps me from going through so much wood. I also clean out the chimney pipe every year and inspect it from the stove all the way through the roof including the chimney cap. Anything that looks worn gets replaced prior to the new heating season.

    Love my fisher!!!

    Sidepasser
     
  11. Cabin Fever

    Cabin Fever Life NRA Member since 1976 Supporter

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    The Fisher Big Bear (actually your's is probably called a Fisher Grandpa Bear) is an air-tight stove. You do not need to use a damper. Air flow to your woodstove is controlled thru the adjustable air inlets on the stove.
     
  12. marvella

    marvella Well-Known Member

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    i have a fisher too.

    cabin fever is right. no damper needed.