More Questions about making butter

Discussion in 'Cattle' started by FlipFlopFarmer, Jan 18, 2004.

  1. FlipFlopFarmer

    FlipFlopFarmer Well-Known Member

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    Okay - so I made butter for the first time today and I came up with some questions:

    1) Do you HAVE to rinse the butter? In the process of rinsing it, a lot of water was left which I had trouble getting out. Which leads me to my second question....

    2) How do you get the excess water out? I was trying to use my cutting board (tipping it at an angle) and the flat part of a pancake turner to press out the water but it didn't work very well. Okay - so I have watery butter - it still tastes better than margarine any day!

    3) The books I've seen all show use a butter board and paddles. Where in the heck would I find such things? Are they necessary or is there a better way?

    :haha: Maybe there's a salad spinner type thing.....only for butter! :haha:

    Thanks for your help everyone!
    Carla
     
  2. jucal

    jucal Well-Known Member

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    Hi Carla,
    I use a large mixing bowl (almost like one of those wooden salad bowls) and one of those large spoons (mine is stainless steel seems like the butter doesn't stick to it very bad) to rinse my butter in. I will rinse and work the butter in the clean water. I drain the water and rinse again and continue to do this until the water is as clear as I can get it. Once I do this I use the back of the spoon to mash the butter aganist the bowl to squeeze the excess water out. I do that several times until no more water comes out. I then add the salt and put it in little plastic containers to mold the butter. When I put in the containers there is still a little water that comes out when pressing it down. I just dump that water out and keep on pressing. I do have a butter paddle that I use some and I also have a butter mold that I very seldom use. Hope this makes since to you and can be of some help.
    Judy
     

  3. Oregonsparkie

    Oregonsparkie Well-Known Member

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    Ive made butter in a blender before but I never rinsed mine in water. I just used a spoon to mash the butter against a bowl but a press would be much better I think. Once I got the whey(liquid) out of the butter I added some salt then put it into a container and put in the refrigerator to harden
     
  4. Oxankle

    Oxankle Well-Known Member

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    In all the years that I made butter at home I never ever washed it with water. We made the butter in a churn, fished it out in one lump after it had been paddled around in the churn long enough for all the little bits to form one ball.

    Then we worked it in a cold bowl until all the noticeable buttermilk was out of it, put it in a bowl and USED it. Sometimes Mama salted it, sometimes not. We ate a LOT of butter. Oyster stew made with whole milk, hot butter floating on the top with pepper. Hot grits with salt, pepper and butter. Carrots cooked in sugar and butter. Pancakes with syrup and butter. Fresh home-made bread, round loaf, four big slices cut off the sides so that the remainder was square, four ten-year old boys eating hot bread and butter after school.
    Ox
     
  5. Paula

    Paula Well-Known Member

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    You wash butter to get the whey out. Butter spoils much more quickly if you don't wash it. If you use up what you make pretty quickly it doesn't much matter if you wash it or not. I make all our butter, and usually make 3 or four pounds at a time and freeze the extra. I rinse my butter in several changes of very cold water in a large stockpot. I just use my hand to knead and press the butter. I stop when the wash water stays mostly clear. I pour the water out, then knead and press the butter some more till I get most of the water out. Then I knead some salt in. I've tried using spoons and butter paddles to wash butter, but found it much easier to just use my hands.
     
  6. jucal

    jucal Well-Known Member

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    Well Paula, it is so nice to hear that someone else washes their butter. I have also found that the butter just tastes sweeter when it has been washed. When you wash it until the water is clear it pretty much tells you that the whey or butter milk is all out. I do make lots of butter also and freez what is not in use. I don't even refridgerate what is in use, about a pound at a time and have never had any go bad or taste strong.
    Judy
     
  7. FlipFlopFarmer

    FlipFlopFarmer Well-Known Member

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    I'm still having trouble getting all the water out. :(

    I tried using a slotted spoon up against the edge of the bowl and tipping it to let the water drain and just a little trickle of water comes out as the butter squishes through the holes.

    I really wish my Mom/Grandma would have shown me all of these little things that are simple yet lost skills.

    I did buy a butter crock which is really awesome to keep the butter cool but spreadable.

    :) Carla
     
  8. Paula

    Paula Well-Known Member

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    It takes a few minutes and a little work to get the water out. You have to knead it a good bit to squeeze all the little droplets out. That's why I find it easier to use my hand (I knead with one hand and keep the other clean so I don't get butter on everything.) You'll get used to it with some practice. I remember feeling the same way when I first made butter.
     
  9. Carol K

    Carol K Well-Known Member

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    I also do it like Paula, with my hands. Just keep kneading and squeezing, like you are playing with clay!! If you don't wash it, it goes sour quicker.

    Carol K
     
  10. mom

    mom New Member

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    I use my hands also. It's so much easier and less to clean. Sometimes I salt sometimes not, or even heavy salt, when someone wants it like that. I had a guy from church make a butter press for me. It is a square box that has a sliding down lid. I load the butter in the bottom and turn it onto a cookie sheet and press the lid down for all I can. Slide the box up and send to freezer. It makes about 1lb blocks.
    I don't know why someone couldn't use a cheese type press to REALLY press the water out. I'm thinking of trying that when the cows fresh again.
    mommykx5
     
  11. whodunit

    whodunit Well-Known Member Supporter

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    When I was a child (4-5) I made the butter. I hated how long it took to get the butter 'clean' and then how long it took to get the butter dry. But the taste! Oh so good! Salting the butter while working the water out of the butter really helps IMO.

    I made butter today, the first time in many many years and it came back very quickly how to work the butter ect.

    Mom had a nice shaped bowl for working the butter and we used a nice flat wooden paddle.

    Nothing like the taste of homeade butter Yummy


    Mrs whodunit
     
  12. Matt NY

    Matt NY Well-Known Member

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    I made butter twice so far. The first time it came great in one nice big ball. Yesterday it was just a bunch of small pieces that wouldn't come together. Don't know why. I use my Grandfathers old dairy thermometer it has a mak at 62 for churning.
    Butter paddles are to be found at Lehmanns.
     
  13. Paula

    Paula Well-Known Member

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    If you get a bunch of small pieces it just means it's a little cold. It'll still be OK, just add some warmer water to your rinse water till it comes together. It does seem like the butter is a little waxier when this happens.
     
  14. jerzeygurl

    jerzeygurl woolgathering

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    you can get the wooden butter paddles at hoegger goat supply. i tried mine (after long time of using spoons) and they do alot better. I still cant get it all out but dont worry so much as i freeze what i dont use. rinsing does help it stay fresh longer.
     
  15. Suzanne

    Suzanne Well-Known Member

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    I also wash my butter, as it will keep longer. I save my cream for almost a week then use an old antique churn that was given to me. I use a wood bowl and paddle. Just rinse and squeeze til clear, then I spread it real thin on the sides of the bowl while tilting it to get all the water out. Then I also get more water out as I'm stuffing it in the glass containers. I have found my bowls and paddles at sales, or antique stores. Most all antique paddles have a chip out of the edge put there on purpose to help with the washing process while scraping the butter thin across the wood bowl. I like the wide wood paddles best, the long narrow ones don't work as good. E-bay might be good also.