Moles and Voles

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by chrisntiff, Dec 19, 2004.

  1. chrisntiff

    chrisntiff Well-Known Member

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    Crane,Mo.
    Im having terrible problems with moles or voles tunneling through my property. Does anyone know any ways to get rid of them? I would'nt want to use any poison or chemicals because my chickens free range. Any help would be appreciated.
     
  2. jackie c

    jackie c Well-Known Member

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    ontario
    I've heard that little windmills, those childrens toys may work, they create vibrations in the ground that drive the critters away. There might be something out on the market that does a better job of that though, I'm not sure.
     

  3. bonnie lass

    bonnie lass Semper Fi

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    Beautiful Cape Cod
    I just finished reading this in a seed catalog


    Ricinus communis Sun
    CASTOR BEAN 25-60s/oz.
    A strikingly attractive and exotic looking background plant that originated in Africa. This can be used as a quick growing temporary hedge and makes a wonderful accent plant in flower beds. The seeds are poisonous, so keep them away from children and pets. They are a mole repellent. Seed pods may be clipped off before they mature if children or pets play in the area where the plant grows. Needs to be staked. The seeds can be used as a mole repellent. Direct seed in early spring. Pre-soak for 24 hours. G@75°F~5 days.



    I understand that you can't grow this because the chickens might eat it, but perhaps you could take the seeds and put them in the tunnels.
     
  4. kjerckie

    kjerckie Well-Known Member

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    NW Washington
    I've heard that taking a shovel and carefully lifting the dirt by the mound, to expose the hole/tunnel...then stuff it with dog, cat or snake poop, and setting the dirt back. It is a predator presence and the moles move elsewhere.
     
  5. dare2b

    dare2b crone

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    I have moles galore here at my place. My son suggested that I find a way to market them on eBay!

    I've tried everything suggested by others including Juicy Fruit gum dropped into the tunnel, my own urine poured into the tunnel, devices that vibrate at a frequency supposed to repel the critters, a spray called MoleStop that is made of soybean oil and castor oil, and sprayed applications of beneficial nematodes. I have not tried traps or poison. The MoleStop seems to slow them down, but I have now decided to use the nematode approach as it seems to be the most natural and will actually benefit my soil as well.

    What I've been told is that the moles are after the grubs and to rid my land of moles I must get rid of the grubs. The beneficial nematodes (and also improving my soil with organic matter) will work to get rid of the grubs. The nematodes feast on any below ground larval matter. As a bonus this includes the eggs of ants (fire ants too!). The drawbacks of using nematodes are (1) it takes repeated applications each year, once in spring, once in summer, once in the fall and (2) it is a slow process requiring persistence.

    If you use Search (at this website and on Google) and plug in mole or moles, you'll come up with many suggested solutions.

    Good luck and I hope this helps!
     
  6. dare2b

    dare2b crone

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  7. Bernadette

    Bernadette Enjoying Polish Rabbits

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    Northern Ontario
    Moles and voles do indeed love to eat the white grubs which are the larvae of the June Bug, which thrive in acid soil. In addition/or instead of the nematodes, get your soil tested. I'm sure you'll find that it's acidic. Add lime to correct your acidity. (I believe you have something down there called Agricultural Extension Offices? - apparently they can direct you in this procedure). This is not an overnight process - your soil didn't become acidic overnight, and correction won't take place overnight either.
     
  8. dare2b

    dare2b crone

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    Quite right. I've found that the organic way is usually the slower-paced way. OK by me.