Mobile garage greenhouse

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by brumer0, Oct 12, 2017 at 9:59 PM.

  1. brumer0

    brumer0 Well-Known Member

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    I've been thinking of a winter solution to gardening. All I think I would really want is fresh tomatoes, cucumbers, and maybe peppers. Something like this could easily be grown in a 4x8 or less area. I could do a greenhouse but why bother? I could put something together on wheels and move it into the garage on days where it's below 35 (?). I'm in NC so we don't get a whole lot of cold spells but it definitely would be challenging to keep a year-round outside greenhouse alive.

    Has anybody done anything like this? I could do a grow light and it would be near a southern facing window.

    Thanks!
     
  2. PlayingInDirt

    PlayingInDirt Well-Known Member

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    I've grown some plants indoors with a light but never fresh produce like that, sounds cool though!
     

  3. geo in mi

    geo in mi Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Miracle Gro Garden Soil Flower & Vegetable 2 Cubic Foot
    Details
    SKU
    10219451
    Weight 40.14 lbs
    UPC 032247345231
    Manufacturer Part # 73452300

    A four by eight space at a foot deep, for roots......
    32 cu ft times 20 lbs equals 640 lbs (DRY, before water)

    Better build it pretty strong with good wheels.

    geo
     
  4. Fire-Man

    Fire-Man Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Just keep in mind----a Greenhouse also uses the temp from the soil to keep the roots warmer(sun warms the inside as well as the ground). When on wheels---air circulates below the "soil" therefore the roots get cold---which will slow down growth or the plant might even die----so if your garage it well heated that would help, but if unheated---Not Good.
     
  5. hunter63

    hunter63 Well-Known Member

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    Wisconsin.. Zone 5
    Actually did a version on this for seedlings....
    In the spring when bringing them outside to "harden them off....tried several things....

    An old door on a Little Red Wagon ....rolling in and out of the garage....worked the best.

    Tried a cold frame.. RR ties and double patio door... top.....Heat control was a problem if you were gone for a part of a day.

    Tried the small fold down greenhouse... also worked pretty well....but one day of not venting it killed everything.

    I did use that green house to cover an area in the garden covering up a pre planned area to extend the season......did work OK...
    You need to take into consideration the...length of sunlight hours...even with lights and has been brought up....soil temps.

    You idea may work fine...but I would not do tomatoes and cukes...they seem to require a lot of water, food light and growing tremps.
    I would stick to greens ...lettuce, kale, chard...etc.

    Interesting experiment......Let us know

    For me...too much effort and cost.... for the returns......
     
  6. brumer0

    brumer0 Well-Known Member

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    Definitely some good points and experiences to consider. Thanks everybody.

    If or when I move forward I may just go with containers. I have some research to do about soil temps and how things grow. Thanks!!
     
  7. PlayingInDirt

    PlayingInDirt Well-Known Member

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    Might consider hydroponics too. I've heard some people grow tomatoes like that but I haven't looked into it. For sure lettuce grows well hydroponic though.