Mint Chocolate

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by Kee Wan, Apr 13, 2006.

  1. Kee Wan

    Kee Wan Well-Known Member

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    My neighbor has a raised bed garden - about 3x3'. She planted some mint chocolate two yeras ago - ans last year - as it had taken over her entire bed - she pulled and gave me some of the rootstock....i planted it in a 18" square planter on the patio.....it was wonderful. Got TONS of mint leaves and had great teas and such all witner.....But - her plants in ther bed are comming back - adn mine are not.....it all looks totally dead - ni signs of life.....

    What went wrong?

    Both were wintered outside in the open - and had the same amount of snow - adn teh smae temperatures.....

    I know that I can get more from her bed again this year - but i'd like to be able to winter the stuff on my own....I'd just plant it in teh ground - but it just takes over everything and I don't have teh appropriate space to keep it contained...

    Thanks
     
  2. Kee Wan

    Kee Wan Well-Known Member

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    oh - and my garlic chives - also in a larger planter are totally gone too.....my regular chives seem to be doign well, but the ones in planters are done for.....

    And another question.....

    I had a wonderful savory plant that I used all last season - and about august, it just died. I cannot figure what I did wrong. I was watring it, and I was using it - so it was getting cut back little by litte...it just started dryign up and died.....still smelled wonderful - but stil dead..... :bash:

    So why am I killing my perrinials?
     

  3. Hovey Hollow

    Hovey Hollow formerly hovey1716

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    Plants in planters tend to dry out quicker because they can't send down a long tap root to get moisture from deep in the ground and they also don't have the insulation that plants in the ground get. Your planters got MUCH colder than their counterparts in the ground. So, probably either lack of moisture or a hard freeze got them.
     
  4. Trisha-MN

    Trisha-MN www.BilriteFarms.com

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    Has it had time to completely get thawed back out? Containers are different the in the ground plantings. Often plants in planters don't survive as well as those planted in the ground because they get colder but that said depending on your zone I'd think that mint and chives would make it. Mine do OK in the their containers although the mint expecially takes much longer to perk up than any of the ground planted stuff.
     
  5. Kee Wan

    Kee Wan Well-Known Member

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    Both were well thawed out - and the dirt was not particularly dry in either one. They both had about three weeks beyond what my ground stuff had to begin to show some sign o flife. The neighbor has her raised bed full of mint chololate and hers is about 4 inches high right now, mine have no color anywhere and no scent either. So I'm reasonably sure that they are completly gone.....

    It's esentially the same with the garlic chives.....I guess that I'll just have to get some more - adn plant them in the ground.....

    As for the savory - I jsut havent' got a clue - it died well before the first frost. What a bummer - I luved being able to put fresh savory in stuff.....
     
  6. Kee Wan

    Kee Wan Well-Known Member

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    Anyone know if this would grow in a shady spot. I have a niver shady spot that I'd like to grow something in - and this is so pretty.

    Alternatly, any ideas of what to grow there? WE like things that are not too labor intensive and that we can use - and tha smell nice if at all. The mint has a nice fresh scent - but not too overwhelming.

    Thanks
     
  7. BillyGoat

    BillyGoat Well-Known Member

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    When I had mint, what i would do...to keep it from spreading and yet keep it from drying out so much; I would plant it in a large pot. The I would put the bottom 1/3 of the pot into the ground.
     
  8. hisenthlay

    hisenthlay a.k.a. hyzenthlay

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    What zone are you in? I've wintered mine in 6b in big pots (24" h and wide)and they did fine. I'd say maybe yours froze. Still, I'd say not to give up yet. This stuff is pretty hard to kill--it may come back yet. I took some of my chocolate mint in for the winter, and it got an infestation of white flies, so I cut all of the green growth down to the soil level and put it out for a couple of freezes (about 20 degree weather for several days, at least), hoping to kill off those bugs. I'm now just starting to notice a small amount of green growth creeping back.

    If it doesn't come back this year, I'd say to get new stuff from the neighbor and take it inside next year, or at least put it in a sheltered spot next to the house for warmth. I think it would do fine in partial shade, but it might grow pretty scraggly in deep shade.

    Good luck--we love our chocolate mint and orange mint too, for iced tea in the summer!