Mini-welding Table Tip

Discussion in 'Shop Talk' started by Ken Scharabok, Jan 7, 2005.

  1. Ken Scharabok

    Ken Scharabok In Remembrance

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    When I was at the scrapyard last Monday I found a piece of 1/4" plate right at 12" x 12". I have welded a piece of flat stock on the bottom for a vise grab point. I do most of my arc welding at the table vise and have been surprised just how useful it is as a mini-welding table.

    Ken Scharabok
     
  2. insanity

    insanity Well-Known Member

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    Love to look around the scrap yard myself. :D

    My current table is about 4ft square.1inch thick plate.Looks like it was a machine top of some type at some point,since the edges are beveled.And the best part was i didn't have to go far to get it,and it was free.My neighbors three houses down left it when they moved.Id been looking at it propped up on a brick in the drive way for three months.It thought it was just a piece of ply wood.But one day the wife wanted to go down and have a look at the house,since the original owner had put it up for sale.Imagine my surprise when i stepped up on it and it tilted making a metallic sound as it hit the ground. :eek: (it even looked like plywood at dusk.) The reel estate (sp?) agent said by all means carry it home.He couldn't find anyone to move it.Given its weight.So i went home and got my trusty dolly.Humph i like to have not been able to roll it that far.LOL Then i about pulled the trusses down in my shed trying to pick it up with a chain host to put it on the table frame i made.Lord I'm glad i didn't loose a finger in the process.
    Had to brush off the surface rust,but there is hardly no pitting to it.High temp black BBQ paint worked great to keep the rust off.And not build up to thick when touching up.
    Anyway I'm so tickled with my new table top i just couldn't help but post about it. :D
    Now if i could just stumble upon some rail road iron to use for an anvil.Or an old anvil. :D
     

  3. Ken Scharabok

    Ken Scharabok In Remembrance

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    At the moment there are about twenty anvils for sale on eBay. 55-pound and 110 Russian or Asian imports are also readily available both on eBay and in larger tool outlets and catalogs. Avoid those which are solid cast iron. Even those who say they are hardened tempered steel are of questionable qualify. On eBay shipping, watch out for shipping costs.

    Continue to look at the scrapyard to see if you can come across the slug metal say 6" round by 6" or more in height. You can weld a U shaped piece on the side for a hardy hole.

    Ken Scharabok
     
  4. BobBoyce

    BobBoyce Well-Known Member

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    Not far from here there are some retired RR tracks (leftovers from the mines that closed down decades ago) that have been pulled up in places to accomodate new road work. I keep eying those old sticks of RR track laying in the weeds by the road and wondering what could be done with them. I imagine those things are real heavy.

    I did pick up a few of the spikes off the side of the road to use for chisels.

    A bit further away they had had a derailment many years ago, and were inviting people to come cut the railroad cars and tracks up and haul them away as scrap.

    I think that's all cleared up by now, but I was so tempted to join in on that. I have congestive heart failure and associated complications, so I'm not that agile and don't have any stamina anymore. I felt it would have been too risky in my state of health. I sure could have used some nice heavy guage steel for projects though.

    My health may be poor, but I still love to build things. I can't help it, it's in my blood. :haha:

    Bob
     
  5. Ken Scharabok

    Ken Scharabok In Remembrance

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    On plate stock, problems isn't really in finding it, but in cutting it. Scrapyard had a goodly supply of 1/4" material from about 4' x 8' down. The piece I purchased was actually about 18" x 12". I cut off 6" by putting a metal cutting blade in my table saw and then did passes on both sides cutting deeper grooves each pass from both sides until it was able to be snapped apart. Then grinder dressed the edge.

    Ken Scharabok
     
  6. insanity

    insanity Well-Known Member

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    Here you go Ken! You need to find one of these to fit your table saw. :D
    http://www.right-tool.com/dewmetcutcir.html
    Wondering how good they work myself?

    Also ran across this while searching.Cordless,hum. http://www.toolsofthetrade.net/arti...ticleID=2123&position=1&type=article&partID=1

    I was looking for a blade i seen one time that would cut threw a 6x4 inch block of steel in meir seconds. :eek: I lost the link in puter crash.Id like to see that sucker in action.

    I seen a show on TV about anvils a while back after that im scared to buy one sight unseen.Although after using a piece of rail track previously any anvil would be better im sure. :D
    (When we moved it got lost some how.)
     
  7. Ken Scharabok

    Ken Scharabok In Remembrance

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    I can go through a whole lot of $3.00 chop saw blades for the $150 - $350 price of those blades.

    I have hot cut some large chunks of steel. Just heated it in the propane forge to a high orange/yellow and then used the chop saw to go right on through it.

    On anvils, didn't see show, but suspect it may have been on the new Russian and Asian one-piece cast anvils. In the blacksmithing trade they are referred to as ASOs (anvil shaped objects). The cast-iron ones should be backed away from with your fingers in the shape of a cross. Pure s**t unless you are looking for a gluing weight. The ones advertised as cast steel are little better. Lousy casting/finishing. Horribly shaped horn. No punching hole. Heel is not shaped to be a working surface on many. Oversized hardy hole on most. Friend bought one to dress up and found body putty on the side to hide some defects. Claim is they are heat-treated. Heat treating a large metal objects is a fairly precise and costly step. When these sell for the prices they do, just how much quality do you think was put in them?

    For a review of these go to www.anvilfire.com and use the Navigation link to find the review.

    These imports remind me of an American company (American Skein & Foundry in Racine, WI) which made anvils (brand name Badger) in about 14 weights for about sixty years. Not a single one of them has been found dispite a fairly extensive search. Quality must have been so bad most ended up in war scrap iron drives.

    It takes some looking, but for the same money or less you can find good used American, Swedish, German or British made anvils. Put a wanted ad in small town newspapers to the effect: Wanted: Blacksmith anvil. XXX-XXXX. Still lots of them around.

    In the meantime go to a scrapyard and look for a piece of round stock, say 6-10 in diameter and several inches high. They make nice anvils - even the mild steel ones.

    I don't claim to be an expert to anvils, but do know quite a bit about them. If you see on one eBay you like, you can e-mail me at scharabo@aol.com with the auction number and I'll tell you what I know about it and my option. On eBay anvils, watch out for shipping cost. They might be more than the cost of the anvil.

    There is one on eBay now in Bowling Green, KY. 100 LB Vanadium Steel anvil. Likely won't sell high and it is a very good anvil. These were carried by both Sears and Montgomery Ward at one time.

    If you are looking for used blacksmithing tools, eBay has turned into a nice flea market for them.

    Ken Scharabok
     
  8. Ross

    Ross Moderator Staff Member Supporter

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    I helped clean out my grandmothers house when she died, in the "trash was a section of railroad track that had been cut into a one foot length and given away to any man who wanted one when the local track was replaced in the mid 30's. Apparently my grandfather was one of them so I grabbed it before it became landfill. I have a CPR (Canadian Pacific Railway) anvil from the 1920's, I'll never part with. All I really need is time to do the ornimental stuff I'd like to sell etc. I really didn't need to know eBay has lots of blacksmith tools........ I'll just look,..... so long as my wife is out of the house anyhow!
     
  9. Ken Scharabok

    Ken Scharabok In Remembrance

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    For those wanting a RR track anvil, they are very hard to cut, at least on a bandsaw. Years ago I have about a 24" section and someone wanted half so deal was they do the cutting. He worked in a machine shop. Put the track on their bandsaw when he went to work. When his shift ended it was just finishing cutting through.

    I have seen some really nifty little anvils machined out of them.

    Ken Scharabok