Mini Donkey

Discussion in 'Equine' started by Bubbas Boys, Sep 12, 2017.

  1. Bubbas Boys

    Bubbas Boys Well-Known Member

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    We picked up 2 mini donkeys this past weekend. Been researching for a year or so and looking and finally found ones that seemed like the right choice. Got rid of the alfalfa hay as recommended and got grass, haven't gave any grain yet. Question is, should we give free choice hay or how many flaked a day per donkey. They are starting on a good neck roll. Very healthy looking. ....thanks.
     
  2. Irish Pixie

    Irish Pixie Limp Bisket LOL

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    Neck roll as in they are starting a cresty neck?
     

  3. G. Seddon

    G. Seddon Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Generally speaking, miniature donkeys do not require any grain; they'll get by fine on pasture (limited access if it's lush grass). They'll try to convince you that they need hay, grass, AND grain, but they don't. Hay is fine too, especially in the winter when grazing is limited or snow-covered. I've learned that it's not the amount that's important but the timing. If you give them something at 8 AM one day and are five minutes late the next day, you'll hear about it.

    Are they going to be pets?
     
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  4. Bubbas Boys

    Bubbas Boys Well-Known Member

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    Yep, just fun pets for little farm and family. Well, big family. Haha.
     
  5. Bubbas Boys

    Bubbas Boys Well-Known Member

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  6. Wolf mom

    Wolf mom Well-Known Member

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  7. Bubbas Boys

    Bubbas Boys Well-Known Member

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  8. Irish Pixie

    Irish Pixie Limp Bisket LOL

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    In my opinion, the one in post 5 is too fat. There is a definite crest to his or her neck, and a pronounced fat pad just above the tail. I wouldn't feed free choice hay, I'd limit it to one flake morning and night. No grain.

    They are adorable, and so are the kids with them.
     
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  9. Bubbas Boys

    Bubbas Boys Well-Known Member

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    Thank u. I was actually wondering if that is over far already. She is fatter then him. We will do flake by flake feeding then. Thanks!! Boys are crazy excited!!
     
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  10. G. Seddon

    G. Seddon Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Well, it certainly looks like they won't lack for attention! They love to be brushed have a their feet cleaned, etc. All attention will be most welcome! After they're accustomed to their new home, you can probably remove the halters so they don't get caught on something.

    Yes, it's easier to prevent weight gain than to lost weight.

    Hope you have a jennet and a gelding (not an intact male).

    Congratulations!
     
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  11. Bubbas Boys

    Bubbas Boys Well-Known Member

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    Huh.... he is an intact make. What should our concernd be? Breeders recommended it. She is already breed by him. Have been together....
     
  12. Irish Pixie

    Irish Pixie Limp Bisket LOL

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    How old are they?
     
  13. G. Seddon

    G. Seddon Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Breeder recommended it? Well, I don't know about Illinois, but here in VA there is no longer any market for miniature donkeys....it used to be that you could not find a bred jennet for under $2500-$3000....now, it's difficult to give donkeys away.

    You may not have any concerns now, but after she foals, you may. A donkey jack can be a real management problem. They are immensely strong. An intact male can be unpredictable, just as a bull can be.

    Get in touch with the folks at NMDA (Natl. Miniature Donkey Association) and ADMS (American Donkey & Mule Association) and read and learn about caring for them. You can google those organizations also.

    If your donkeys are exceptional in conformation and temperament, that's one thing. If not, the foal will most likely be a backyard pet. It's given fact that geldings make better (and happier) pets. Foals are adorable, but you need to prepare yourself to manage your donkeys when that jennet has her foal and comes back in heat about 10 days later.
     
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  14. Bubbas Boys

    Bubbas Boys Well-Known Member

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    Ok. Will do. Thanks for all advise...
     
  15. aoconnor1

    aoconnor1 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    You have been given much information, all good! I have 7 little donkeys, and each one is lovely in its own little way. Remember that fat rolls on a donkey are permanent and won't go away. Make sure your feeding program includes visually observing the donkeys condition and changing the amounts fed if you notice increased fat deposits. Mini mules can lose their rolls, but donkeys can not.

    Darling pics! Enjoy the little guys!!
     
  16. Bubbas Boys

    Bubbas Boys Well-Known Member

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    Thanks everyone. Breeder said Jennet is 7 and the Jack is 5.
     
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  17. aoconnor1

    aoconnor1 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I would definitely geld the jack. Have a vet do it though that is familiar with gelding donkeys as the donkeys have a little more difficulty with bleeding, etc.
     
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  18. DragonFlyFarm

    DragonFlyFarm Well-Known Member

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    My mini was 5 when I gelded him - keeping the site & legs clean is a pain (donkeys don't like water) and hand walking him afterwards was a chore. Dante wasn't feeling well and didn't want to do a nice brisk walk (he has one speed, slow) Took my husband pushing him from behind and me pulling from the front. When the vet called to check in I told him our routine and the vet just chuckled. Not surprised he says.... that being said he is a much happier donkey now. Donkeys are wonderful animals, have great personalities and are quite sweet. Set up a dry lot for your two - they get fat off of air, controlling their intake is super important. Have fun!
     
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  19. Jessica488

    Jessica488 New Member

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    I am also new to equines and am wondering what treats are healthy for mini donkeys? I have Pygmy goats that get treats for good behavior but that are also a good part of their diet. I don't want to leave my donkey out!
     
  20. G. Seddon

    G. Seddon Well-Known Member Supporter

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    There are many things that donkeys like (apples, carrots, bread) as well as the manufactured horse treats. They can tell from 25 feet away if you have treats in your pocket. Whatever you choose, be careful of hand feeding. They quickly learn to grab. If I had willpower, I'd feed any treats in a feed pan so they don't get pushy. Now that I think about it, I would brush them instead of giving goodies. They LOVE brushing. One of ours will stand to be brushed and then move forward or backward, depending on where she wants you to brush. It's also a good opportunity to pick up their feet and clean them. Your farrier will love you for it.