Mine shaft............

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by dave85, Nov 1, 2006.

  1. dave85

    dave85 dave85

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    My friends who bought the 40 acres have a mine shaft on it. abandoned of course.
    where would I find info on shoring it up, cause they want to use it as a cache.

    Other than starting at the front and framing it as you go back.
    Dave
     
  2. blufford

    blufford Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Depending on how cool it stays you may be able to grow mushrooms inside. You should probably shore it up first.
     

  3. Windy in Kansas

    Windy in Kansas In Remembrance

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    Depending upon the state--the Bureau of Mines in that state would probably know best.
     
  4. magnolia2017

    magnolia2017 Well-Known Member

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    Sounds like the ultimate cache :) Find someone who has mining experience and would know about how to properly shore up the mine.

    Maggie
     
  5. Beltane

    Beltane Enjoying Four Seasons

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    How very neat! If they ever take any pictures I would love to see some. How very cool. :)
     
  6. SolarGary

    SolarGary Well-Known Member

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    Hi,

    You want to be a bit careful.
    The oxygen in mine shafts can be used up by rotting timber and the like and leave the air without enough oxygen to breath. Its probably fine, but I'd use some caution.

    Gary
    (an x-mining engineer :)
     
  7. comfortablynumb

    comfortablynumb Well-Known Member

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    we have those around here iin some places.... they are interesting but really really dangerous. I know of one we walk past now and then, the last time we hiked past it it was totally collapsed and gone. it LOOKED sturdy, it was dry. one night of heavy rain was to much for the roof I guess.

    I imagine, the soundness of the whole thing would depend a great deal on the rock strata its dug in.

    ask the engineer above.... I dunno, all I know is I am skeert to go more than 20 feet into one.

    lol
     
  8. danb98577

    danb98577 Well-Known Member

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    If there is a drift(I am assuming you mean horizontal) there is probably still someone in the area with mining experience. I did this for many years commercially, but that is of little use from such a distance. Common sense and caution is your best resource at this point. Failing finding an active or retired miner in your area, get to the library and look for underground mining books-preferably timbering manuals and general mine safety procedures. If you get the Bureau of Mines involved you will proably wind up as a Superfund cleanup site or some such ridiculous thing. Might try to contact the Colorado School of Mines-they should be of some help.
    If this is actually a vertical rise, you be VERY careful fooling around with it.
    BE CAREFUL-Dan
     
  9. Cygnet

    Cygnet Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Also, what type of mine?

    Pollution (heavy metals) can be a very serious issue with some types of mines. THis isn't a guarantee but is something to keep in mind.

    Tailings need to be checked too, and any buildings on the place.
     
  10. RedneckPete

    RedneckPete Well-Known Member

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    I spent 15 summers of my life wandering around abandoned uranium mines, including the tailings dumps. No cancer yet.

    Google "dyno uranium mine" for more info. Maybe that's why I am the way I am.

    Pete
     
  11. Shadow

    Shadow Well-Known Member

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    Modern miners with all the safety equipment and tools die real often, homesteaders with a hole in the ground have a short live span. Stay out, poison gas, burried alive , crushed by falling rock, you name it, good ways to get killed, nothing good will be found in that mine.
    Also it means your friends do not in all probabliity own the mineral rights to their land. What kind of mine was it?
     
  12. The Paw

    The Paw Well-Known Member

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    No kidding.... Do your friends not watch the news?

    By the way, tell them if they see Timmy, Lassie is looking for him... :)
     
  13. Christiaan

    Christiaan Dutch Highlands Farm

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    There is an old zinc mine less than 1/4 mile from our place. Area kids used to explore it. About 5 years ago the back half of it caved in. Now it just goes in about 150 feet to a water-filled vertical shaft. I've considered calling the state mine people about having it sealed up (its not on my property) before my DGD is old enough to go exploring in the woods. I am afraid that they would seal it too well as I'm sure there are bats roosting in it. There are three more shafts on the other side of the ridge, but I've never seen them.
     
  14. dave85

    dave85 dave85

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    shaft/vent first and had already covered it and marked it.
    This weekend they found the actual mine opening. This land is really submountainous (?) canyons. the opening to the mine was hidden behind some brush, discovered during a bathroom call.

    Geology is rock, very shallow soil.

    we realize the inherent danger in this. And the liability.
    My thinking is maybe 20 feet or so into opening at most.

    Thanks for all the replies.

    Dave
     
  15. dave85

    dave85 dave85

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    magnasite (sp) mine. evidently there are numerous of these throughout this area.
    dave


     
  16. comfortablynumb

    comfortablynumb Well-Known Member

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    a hard rock mine is "safer" than the coal mines in PA.... the old coal mines here are under shale, with the ever abundant water warer everywhere eroding everything.....

    a hard rock mine is somewhat "safer", but only in a comparison.

    I would be more comfortable using a hard rock mine shaft for some 'emergency hidey hole" than one of our local coal mine tunnels...
     
  17. danb98577

    danb98577 Well-Known Member

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    GOOD lights and slowly....check the back(ceiling) for loose rock BEFORE you proceed. Not familiar with the geology there, but do not go poking or prodding anything to see if it is solid-it likely isn't. One of the most miserable, but necessary tasks in underground mining is "barring down"-using a steel bar with a point that is roughly 15-20 feet long and prying loose rock off the back and ribs. Shoulders and arms turn to jello in short order, but it keeps one alive. In your case, I don't think you should do this-too many unknowns in this situation. Suggest you just "look" for now. Be safe-Dan
     
  18. Ed Norman

    Ed Norman Well-Known Member

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    A local guy had his dog run into an old shaft. Dog wouldn't come when called, because it was dead from lack of oxygen. So he went in after it. Now he is dead, too.