Milking Tubes

Discussion in 'Goats' started by Spinner, Jun 9, 2006.

  1. Spinner

    Spinner Well-Known Member

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    Does anyone use them to milk goats? I've used them with cows, and it makes it soooooo easy on the hands and really got the milk out fast. Saved me a lot of milking time on my 6 gallon a day Holstein.

    For those of you who haven't heard of them, they are small stainless steel tubes (about the size of a coffee stir stick) with a collar near one end. Just put the tube in the teat and watch the milk run into the bucket. :dance:
     
  2. Laura Workman

    Laura Workman (formerly Laura Jensen) Supporter

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  3. dosthouhavemilk

    dosthouhavemilk Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Sounds like a dilator...which my father refers to as "Die-sooner-rather-than-laters" Absolutely last ditch affort when used here. The cow will generally die otherwise, so you ain't got nothing to lose.
    Talk about introducing bacteria into the teats.
    At least from your description that is what I am seeing.
    Why not just use a milking machine?
    I would urge you against using those. It irritates the teats, not to mention the risk of introducing bacteria, which causes mastitis.
     
  4. dosthouhavemilk

    dosthouhavemilk Well-Known Member Supporter

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    The following was written by my father. As much to explain it to me as anything. It appears we have a milking tube down in the barn. I've never seen it used though.

    "The stainless steel milking tube is not quite the same as a dilator, and being stainless steel, can be boiled for 15 minutes between uses as a sterilization technique. However, from the time of removal from the boiling water until the insertion into the teat, there is still plenty of opportunity for airborn particles to contact the surface, turning it into a device to inoculate the udder with disease causing pathogens. Again, I have always seen milking tubes as a course of last resort for severely injured teats. They might be beneficial when the teat is so damaged and swollen that hand or machine milking irritates the tissue to the point that the healing process is jeopardized. In those cases a drain or milking tube allows the milk (bacterial growth medium) to be removed without so much tissue damage. We use prepackaged sterile plastic tubes in those cases, after some attempt to sterilize the teat end. Even this is seldom successful in terms of avoiding mastitis, but there have been enough successes that we continue the practice on rare occasions."
     
  5. Spinner

    Spinner Well-Known Member

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    I guess I was lucky. I used them on my milking cow for several months and never had a problem. I didn't boil them for 15 minutes, but I did dip them in boiling water after washing them in hot soapy water, then kept them in a zip lock bag until I was ready to use them again. I used them because my cow was giving 3 gal. at each milking. My hands would give out before the milk did. I guess my days of using milking tubes is over. Thankfull goats don't give 3 gallons per milking! LOL