Milking Togg/Boer Cross?

Discussion in 'Goats' started by noname, May 22, 2006.

  1. noname

    noname Well-Known Member

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    OK, folks, here's my dilema. I've got 2 Toggs who are not the best milkers in the world. I've done my best to get their production up thanks to a bunch of great suggestions from this board, but with only limited success. I'm willing to try once to freshen them and see if they milk better next year. I was also planning to keep a doeling out of the best of the two girls I have. I'm on a fairly limited budget and don't have a couple hundred bucks to shell out for another doe.

    My neighbor has a Boer buck. The advantages to breeding to him are a) close (I can walk my girls over there) and b) free.

    There is another goat person in the area who has several different dairy breeds. I think her buck is an Alpine. She's farther away and the breeding would not be free.

    Has anyone here milked a Togg/Boer cross? Do you think a Togg/Alpine cross would give a significant amount more milk, as in enough to make it worth paying to have her bred? I know there's no way of telling for sure, just looking for everyone's best guess. My dh does not like spending money on animals and is pushing for the freebie, but I'm more interested in milk than meat.

    Thanks.
     
  2. KSALguy

    KSALguy Lost in the Wiregrass Supporter

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    what kind of Boer is it? is it from good southAfrican stock? Pure Well bred boers do have good milk production, our pure bred boer does had huge bags but they needed them to feed their multiple births
    we did have some Boer Nubian and Boer Lamacha crosses that were good milkers,
    i would go ahead and breed to the Boer and cross my fingers that a good doeling comes of it, if nothing else you have some nice meat to harvest later,
    how many times have you freshend these does? or did you buy them in milk last time? it may be that if this is their first feshening that they have had at your place they may be settled in well enough to have good production for you, we never got as good of results when we bought milk does that were already milking, as when we bred them our self the next time and had them from start to finnish.
     

  3. noname

    noname Well-Known Member

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    I don't really know a lot about the Boer yet but I will ask.

    I got these does in milk just a couple of months ago. I'm thinking the same thing - that they might do better once they freshen at our place, which is why I'm not willing to give up on them yet. The little one isn't doing too badly, considering she's a fairly small goat and this is her first freshening. The bigger one is actually milking a lot less than her little sister.

    Thanks for the reply - I would really rather breed to the Boer just because the price is right!
     
  4. dezeeuwgoats

    dezeeuwgoats Well-Known Member

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    I have a friend who has a boer/dairy cross doe who milks a gallon a day - and has a longer lactation (not as long as a dairy doe, but longer than her other boers). I have heard that the milk is richer, can't say for sure, as it is hear say.

    niki
     
  5. noname

    noname Well-Known Member

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    Cool! :)

    I will definitely go with the Boer then, at least this time around, and hope for a little doeling or two. Of course my neighbor had 11 bucks this year, so who knows.
     
  6. TexCountryWoman

    TexCountryWoman Gig'em

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    I am going to give you the opposite advice. You specifiaclly said that you are more interested in milk rather than meat. I raise both LaMancha dairy goats and Boer meat goats. I am also milking a 1/2 LaMancha 1/4 Nubian 1/4 Boer. She is a wonderful milker, but she gives less than a LaMancha dairy goat does. And her lactations are not as long, she dries up earlier.

    It may well improve your stock to breed to the Alpine. You say your Toggs are not that heavy of producers, well, if you breed to a Boer, their daughters will be even less 'dairy" in character. If you breed your Toggs to an Alpine, you may end up with some fine doelings, possibly superior to their mothers, depending on the quality of the buck.

    After the trouble of taking the doe to the Alpine, and paying the fee, the cost will be the same for better stock. And again, you said your interest was milk. They will cost the same amount of money to feed and care for, the same amount of time invested. Go the extra mile, so to speak, and breed for milk production. Boers pack on flesh instead of putting their feed into the milkpail. Dairy breeds don't put on flesh, they convert feed directly into milk.

    That's what I would do if I wanted milk instead of meat.
     
  7. wooly1s

    wooly1s Well-Known Member

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    We crossed Toggs with Nubians. High production (from Toggs) higher butterfat (Nubians). I'm inclined to side with Diane...if you really want milk, go for the Alpines, if they have good dairy lines. My daughter raises Alpines...excellent production. In fact, we're culling the rest of the dairy herd to keep her Alpines. Might want to consider the cost of milk when deciding on what you are willing to pay for a buck fee...It just might be worth it to pay more...We've got great bucks around here that stand for $35...which translates into roughly 11 gallons of cow's milk from the store, plus you get a kid (or two) out of it! Not a bad deal!