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I'm a little unsure where to set up our area to milk..... Our largest area has chickens... So, a lot of dust. The barn/shed area that will contain the goats and has a pasture for them is not big enough to have a milking area. Obviously a devoted milking parlor isn't an option. So where do you milk if you only milk 1-2 goats? We have south facing shed that has a pony stall and the rest is open and I'm wondering if it would work.... It has electricity and running water but it is open. It also crossed my mind that the garage would work beautifully but I'm not sure dh would be thrilled with it... And he does woodworking in there occasionally. What do I need to be thinking about?
 

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for a good part of the year I just milk in a grassy area in the pasture. I have a shed for when the weather is bad but I prefer to be out in the sunshine whenever possible and it really seems like the cleanest place since Idon't have a dedicated milkroom or anything. a covered porch, dection of a garage, anything will work really. I milk thru a filter (doubled paper towel rubberbanded over the top of my container) and I don't get too worried about bacteria or anything although when my stand is in the shed I make it a point to cover it with a tarp or the chickens will roost on it and well, ...they do what chickens to best.
 

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My milking shed is "open" on half a side (just a simple frame structure with siding, and the opening for it is a 4' wide gate). It faces east so the wind doesn't blow in there. The "floor" is pea gravel. (The milking shed was built in such a way, though, that a wood plank floor can be put in there if desired).
 

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First of all, are you the BlsdMama from diaperswappers? If not, I apologize. If so, Hi!!!

We were only milking one doe last year, and will be milking two this year. My dh built our milk stand, and for most of the summer it was just up against a fence, completely exposed. It did suck to milk in the rain, lol, but my point is that you don't need anything fancy. Now it is inside a small lean-to, enclosed on three sides, but no electricity or water. I just take all my stuff (buckets, udder wash, towels) outside, milk and bring the milk immediately into the house and strain it there.

Milking one doe only took me about 20 minutes from the time I left the house until I was back inside, and that included feeding, watering, and milking. So it's not like you're going to be spending a lot of time out there....a lot of creature comforts aren't necessary. I'd set it up in the shed you talked about. Clean it up well, put down a gravel floor, put your milk stand and a table in there. Get a cover for your pail so to keep out the dust, and you'll be good to go.
 

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I milk my goats in the garage. Hubby isn't too happy, but he hasn't built me a separate milk room either. I live where the winters are cold, so like to milk out of the elements, though the garage is not heated. If the weather is not too cold to milk in the pony shed (and the pony isn't using it) that would probably work fine. Wherever you decide to milk, make sure not to have your grain storage where your goats could get into it.
 

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... It did suck to milk in the rain, lol, but my point is that you don't need anything fancy. ...
LOL? Was that your goat's reaction while she was standing in the rain too? ;) Mine convinced me that roof is not just optional by managing to put both hind hoofs in the milking bucket - all while being hobbled.
 

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LOL? Was that your goat's reaction while she was standing in the rain too? ;) Mine convinced me that roof is not just optional by managing to put both hind hoofs in the milking bucket - all while being hobbled.
Teehee! My goat is a witch, so her hind legs are TIED to the legs of the milk stand anyway, so she really didn't have much choice. She complained the whole time, though, and she's a Nubian so it was *painfully* obvious that she wasn't at all happy!
 

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First of all, are you the BlsdMama from diaperswappers? If not, I apologize. If so, Hi!!!

Indeed ma'am I am one and the same! We moved to the country in the first week of October and I fought VALIANTLY to not get the internet. But, after the second time of being truly snowed/iced in, dh explained to me that he wouldn't have to risk life and limb and would be able to work from home if we'd get internet. SO! I'm in the process of catching up on email and getting all settled in. We unpacked in October, bought our laying hens, aquired a couple of rat killers (the most adorable rat terriers), and three rabbits. I grew up on a "real" farm but we were military from 2000-2004 and then rented a house in the country in 2004, but moved to town shortly after that.... So, most of my children don't ever remember having any pets and this is so new to them. We had animals when I was growing up but this goat thing is entirely new to me.

I only know that we can spend a small fortune on goatmilk with three of our littles being sensitive to cows' milk and I am a soaper... Probably the only soaper that moved onto owning goats instead of vice versa, lol! :p
 

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My milking stand is wedged in between the hay bales and the feed cans, fenced off from their "space" in the lean-to of the barn. Not a lot of room, but after we divided off a place for them and a separate area for feed, everyone was happy. Well, OK, I was happy, they still wanted to bounce around on the hay bales....no can do, girlies.
 

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Indeed ma'am I am one and the same!
Well, it's good to hear from you again, and I wish you well with your farming endeavors! I also grew up on a real farm, but we too just about a year ago got back to our roots with chickens and goats. We also just purchased a nice 22 acre tract of land to build our dream house on (have to sell first...fun times for that), so we will hopefully be able to add some beef cattle and horses into the mix in the next year or so. I really want to be a true homesteader someday!

Have you looked at this site: fiascofarm.com ? I know you prefer herbs, and she has a lot of good newbie goat advice as well as quite a few recipes for herbal wormers and other remedies.

Nice to "see" you again!
 
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