Milking Fever...??

Discussion in 'Goats' started by BiGtImEfArMeRs4, Jan 20, 2005.

  1. BiGtImEfArMeRs4

    BiGtImEfArMeRs4 Well-Known Member

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    PA
    Hayy, can anyone tell me what milking fever is? Also, what causes it and do they need to have milk to have milk fever, or can they get milk fever when they are dried up? The reason I am asking is because we have a boer goat due to kid within this week or next week, and she is not eating a whole lot. We were'nt sure if she is getting milk fever, or getting sick, or just soon to have. Can goats get milk fever while they are springing and are about one to two weeks away from kidding??

    Another question. Do goats slow down on eating before they are ready to kid? If so, normally how long after they start to not eat very much, will it be till they kid?

    Thanks, any information would be a great help!
     
  2. Vicki McGaugh TX Nubians

    Vicki McGaugh TX Nubians Well-Known Member

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    North of Houston TX
    Yes, milkfever before kidding is hypocalcemia, mostly missdiagnosed as Ketosis.

    A doe needs a great deal of energy and calcium to grow those very fast growing kids from the size of puppies at 100 days bred to the 8 pound kids at 150 days bred. In siturations where you have an excellent milker or a doe who is carrying multiple fetus, they can't do this without supplementation............... Without the energy and calcium they need, they rob their bones and blood, and go down. A pretty good rule of thumb is that you should be able to look at your goats diet and see the dietary calcium, alfalfa pellets or alfalfa hay...obviously poor milkers or does who twin are of much less concern than the good milker or the multiple carrier. When you add copper or selenium defficiency to your area, than calcium can become even more of a concern since being defficient in one vitamin or mineral makes the absorption rate of others scewed. With even or treated copper defficiency here I can not deal with the milkers calcium level with just calcium carbonate and sulfate in their minerals, they have to have dietary calcium...............Then the rumen gets acid, they stop eating, which further means they have less and less calcium and energy coming in. Now...yes a doe due to kid in say 8 hours will miss a meal, nest over in the corner of the shavings, not go out on pasture with the rest of the goats and kid....but a doe who refuses her normal meal would immediatly be put on CMPK orally.

    Over on saanendoah.com and our list and on this list in the archives are articles by Sue Reith of hypocalcemia, you need to find them and read them, there is also an emergency what to use at wallmart until you can get the CMPK...try to get the liquid, valleyvet.com sells it, large coops sell it, all other places sell the gel, liquify this in the blender with propolyn glycol or just water and give it to her.

    What is her temperature....against what the name says, Milk fever, does in milkfever have lower than normal temps. They are wobbly on trying to get up and down, and sometimes walk with their hocks or knees together for stability. Vicki
     

  3. BiGtImEfArMeRs4

    BiGtImEfArMeRs4 Well-Known Member

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    Thanks Vicki! The doe seems to be eating fine now. If she stops eating again, I will return to this page and start treating her.
    Thanks again Vicki!