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I've posted on this before but am just really get discouraged :(

We started milking for the first time several months ago and loved the whole process and the milk that we are getting. We started with one doe in milk and now have two going.

We have not changed our practises but, lately our buyers and we can tell that the milk is more goaty. It can be fine the first day, maybe second but then it just starts to taste like goat.

We go overboard with cleaning: clean udder/teats with warm water and vinegar, scrub our hands with a handi-wipe, discard the first few squirts, freeze jars and milk through a filter, right into the frozen jars.

I just don't get why our milk doesn't taste good for very long. Its getting really discouraging. We had all of our kids converted off of store-bought cows milk and now they don't want to drink the goats milk for fear it will taste "Like Daisy smells".

Anyway.. not sure anyone has help on this - I feel like we're trying everything. I know the fridge is certainly cold enough. Diet hasn't changed - maybe the heat? They have plenty of water.... ugh.

Oh and we're not mixing the milk so its not the addition of the other milker.
 

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I don't have any ideas to help you, but I do know that all the goat milk I've ever had starts to get more goaty the longer it sits....
 

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Be powerful. No other option exists.
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Do you have a buck?
 

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Retired Coastie
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I doubt the frozen mason jars really pull out the milks heat as efficiently as believed. How about filtering the milk into jars and then place the jars into a refrigerated bucket of water. The chilling of milk is so critical that some forum folks even submerge the goat’s milk into ice water with actual ice in the bucket. I simply use chilled water to draw the heat out quickly, no complaints here. Milking three goats daily.
 

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Do you think maybe the vinegar is dripping into the milk?

Also... what are you feeding them? You said that you got them a couple of months ago? Did the feed change from the original owner? Also... moving them will stress them out even if they just go across the street. The stress will last a while too and may show symptoms later. Not sure what to do about it other than that.

Cricket
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I wipe the vinegar off really well.

I feed alfalfa hay, alf pellets and purina goat chow. They also have a field to browse in. I will try the buckey of water in the fridge and see if that helps.

Hopefully, something will work. Its not worth all this work to me if its going to taste bad in 1-2 days.
 

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1. Throw out the goat chow. Feed hay, alfalfa pellets, clean wheat, oats, or barley. No molasses or other mixed feed.

2. Use my method of frozen slushy salt water ice in the outside bucket.
http://www.homesteadingtoday.com/showthread.php?t=195827

3. Try Fiasco Farm's recipe for teat dip/wash.
http://fiascofarm.com/goats/teatdip-udderwash.html

4. Do not use a kitchen sponge when you are washing the milk items...bucket, etc.

5. Do not dry the items with a kitchen towel. Air dry the milk bucket upside down on a cookie cooling rack.

6. Do not mix today's milk with yesterday's, or even tonight's with this morning's milk. We put each milking in glass jars with a label: 7/20 PM.
 

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I had the same problem. I thought I was chilling it quickly enough, but I wasn't. I milk into a SS stockpot, then strain. I weigh it in a small 2qt bucket, then pour it into another SS stockpot that has two plastic baggies full of ice. I repeat for the other doe. All bad tastes have gone away.

My guess is that you're not chilling it quickly enough.

Oh, and I feed a mix of 6 parts purina chow, 2 parts alfalfa pellets, 1 part BOSS and 1 part shredded beet pulp. They also get two hay feeders full of hay 1x per day, and a little bit of pasture.
 

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Another possibility- since you are getting the off flavor after a few days in the fridge- maybe your storage conditions aren't cold enough? You could try tweaking your fridge down a degree or two colder. It might not be cold enough or the milk is not in a cold enough spot in the fridge to keep raw milk really fresh? Or try storing it in taller, narrower containers so that the cold can penetrate better? (there's a reason the old milk bottles were the shape they were!)

Not to start a "raw vs. pasteurized" war here, but another consideration would be to pasteurize your home milk to kill off the enzymes that are breaking down the milk fat into that nasty goat flavor. I know you are probably trying to get your kids to have all the benefits of raw milk, but they aren't getting any benefits at all if they are afraid to drink it. Pasteurized with no off taste might be an okay compromise?
 

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cjb said:
I just don't get why our milk doesn't taste good for very long. Its getting really discouraging. We had all of our kids converted off of store-bought cows milk and now they don't want to drink the goats milk for fear it will taste "Like Daisy smells".
Daisy should not "smell". Perhaps it's time to give the barn a good cleaning?
Not trying to be a smart alec, but seriously, well kept dairy goats don't smell bad.
 

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I milk into a stainless steel pot, then run it into the house where I filter it into quart canning jars. I put the jars into an ice water bath and stir the milk every few minutes, until it's cold. Once in the fridge, this milk tastes wonderful for several days. It's all about chilling it FAST. I have never tasted milk that wasn't "goaty" until I got my own milk goats and used this chilling process.
 

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(formerly Laura Jensen)
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I milk into a stainless steel pot. When it's full, I stand up and go to a shelf in the barn where I have a half-gallon glass jar with a filter sitting on it. I pour the milk through the filter into the jar, and then put the jar into a bucket of ice water. Then I milk the next goat. No flavor problems ever.
 

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(formerly Laura Jensen)
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I milk into a stainless steel pot. When it's full, I stand up and go to a shelf in the barn where I have a half-gallon glass jar with a filter sitting on it. I pour the milk through the filter into the jar, and then put the jar into a bucket of ice water. Then I milk the next goat. No flavor problems ever.
 

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(formerly Laura Jensen)
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I milk into a stainless steel pot. When it's full, I stand up and go to a shelf in the barn where I have a half-gallon glass jar with a filter sitting on it. I pour the milk through the filter into the jar, and then put the jar into a bucket of ice water. Then I milk the next goat. No flavor problems ever.
 

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Are there many different plants in your pasture? I have a friend who runs a commercial goat dairy who believes that adding new things to the diet can cause the milk to taste 'goatie' until their digestive systems adjust. The people who consume the cheese they produce appreciate the different flavors this imparts to the cheese. When I added some tree trimmings I noticed this change as well. I'm thinking that as different plants become attractive to the goats, that maybe a change in their browsing choices could affect milk flavor?

Perhaps coming into season could affect the flavor? Usually dairy goats don't 'smell', but if Daisy does - that is an interesting thing to consider.

When we first started drinking goat's milk my family was VERY sensitive to any goatie taste, and they still are paranoid. They won't drink milk that tastes the slightest bit 'goatie' or 'bucky'. That said - I don't do any of the things that are mentioned above as far as chilling. I put my gallon-sized glass jars of warm milk in either the freezer or the fridge to chill - straight from the strainer. We milked by hand up until a month ago - now we milk ten by machine. In other words, in Arizona (think heat), we were taking the time to milk ALL those goats, combining the milk, until we brought it into the house at the end. I could keep milk a week or more without off flavors. The longest I've kept milk is about ten days - and it was still sweet tasting.

Right now, I've got a buck running with my does - they all smell faintly bucky, and have not had the taint affect the milk yet - which completely surprises me. I fully expected to have to give the milk to the pigs for the duration of Henry's 'visit'. Henry is by no means in 'rut', and is not a terribly offensive smelling buck to begin with - so maybe that's why.

The only other thing I can think of is perhaps a case of mastitis? There are types that are very slight, but I would think could affect the flavor of the milk.

The only thing that I would suggest is not milking into the containers you plan on keeping the milk in. I would keep those containers in the house and bring the container of milk into the house. Sounds like your practices are clean - but really, cleanliness is usually the issue with bad-tasting milk. If you've eliminated everything you can think of - you've got to look into changing something else, until you've isolated what's going wrong.

I'm sorry that you are having this problem - it IS discouraging to go to so much trouble, taste a bit of success, and then run into a bump in the road. Unfortunately, much of this homesteading with animals has a steep learning curve, with the steep part in the beginning! (I'm always relieved when I don't accidently kill something to learn my lessons!)

Niki
 

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Are you sanitizing your pail and strainer with clorox or a commercial sanitizer? If not you could have a build up of calcium deposits causing bacteria to grow, Also check the temp of your milk after 2 hrs if it is not down to 45 degrees then your method of cooling is not good enough,
 

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Also, use vinegar a couple of times a week on the milk equipment to cut the build-up. Then rinse thoroughly.
 

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I don't think you can go wrong if you adopt one of the "quick chill" methods posted by others. It's a bit labor-intensive, but right now I'm milking only three does. After each one, I take the milk right into the house, and put it in a squeaky-clean glass container in an ice-water bath (clean dishpan). Ideally, you should be bringing the milk down to about 42 degrees within 1/2 hour (someone correct me if I'm wrong on this, please).

The milk here is still taint-free and delicious after 4 days, and it does not get pasteurized. Good Luck to you. I hope you find the solution so that you can continue to enjoy your goats and their milk.

NeHi
 

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CJB, the quick chill method by vote is the way to go.,,,,I milk two goats into the same bucket then head to the house for a quick chill, no hesitations.....give it a go and get back to us. Good Luck
 
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