Microscope needs a light

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by longshadowfarms, May 30, 2006.

  1. longshadowfarms

    longshadowfarms Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,528
    Joined:
    Nov 26, 2002
    Location:
    Alaska
    I have a Bausch and Lomb basic 50x-200x microscope that has a mirror under it rather than a light. I'd like to put in a light but don't know how or where to get the parts to do it. Anyone have any ideas on where to buy a light, what kind of light and how to put one in? I can post pics of the microscope if that would help. There is a piece that holds the bracket for the mirror that looks like it could easily come out and be replaced with a light but all the websites I've found so far just have bulbs or just have whole microscopes. Guess you aren't supposed to keep these things for a long time and recycle them to keep using them. Would also like to get some stage clips for it but not sure where to get those either.
     
  2. arabian knight

    arabian knight Miniature Horse lover Supporter

    Messages:
    25,223
    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2005
    Location:
    West Central WI.
    Here is a page that has lights on it

    http://www.lehmanscientific.com/mic-assy.html

    We used this type of lights at work easy to replace plubs etc. and it says what types of scopes it fits...

    Lehman Scientific Economy Fluorescent Ring Light. Attaches by three thumb-screws; fits any diameter from 1-3/8" to 2-1/8" (35mm to 55mm). Lightweight plastic construction with metal reflector assembly. 8 Watt ouput. Comes with a spare bulb! Factory new w/60 day warranty.New Supplier- Price Reduced! Price: Was $100.00, NOW ONLY $85.00
     

  3. longshadowfarms

    longshadowfarms Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,528
    Joined:
    Nov 26, 2002
    Location:
    Alaska
    Thank you so much!!!!!! That's exactly what I need!

    One more question - there is another one listed below that is incandescent - any reason flourescent is better? The incandescent description and pic looks like it will fit mine perfectly.
     
  4. roughingit

    roughingit knitwit

    Messages:
    660
    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2005
    Location:
    Oregon
    The flourescent will be cooler (ie: not cook your slides) and provides better quality light. Incandescents tend to make things yellow, whereas flourescents or LEDS will give a clean, white light.
     
  5. arabian knight

    arabian knight Miniature Horse lover Supporter

    Messages:
    25,223
    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2005
    Location:
    West Central WI.
    The only thing I can think of right off the top of my head is just maybe the Fluorescent light is a Whiter light then that from an incandescent bulb? Other then that I can't think of any other reason. I do believe incandescent is more of a yellowish light?
     
  6. longshadowfarms

    longshadowfarms Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,528
    Joined:
    Nov 26, 2002
    Location:
    Alaska
    Sorry to be a pest but I found another possibility. I was looking for stage clips and found this source linked below with a tungsten light. DH says tungsten would be really bright but would it also be a hot light? One would hope that if it is made for the microscope, that they would think about these things. Then again, maybe it is one of those "get what you pay for" things. We've only used this microscope a few times before since it is hard to see w/o the light (we've tried to rig a light to shine into the mirror but it did not work out that well) so I'd really like to be able to make better use of it and do want to do it right. Thanks for all the input thus far!

    http://wardsci.com/product.asp_Q_pn_E_IG0010584_A_Substage+Illuminator
     
  7. arabian knight

    arabian knight Miniature Horse lover Supporter

    Messages:
    25,223
    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2005
    Location:
    West Central WI.
    I would think that it IS made for microscopes then the tungsten bulb that is in there would be small enough that heat would not be too much of an issue. Now those round ones they do get somewhat hot themselves so no bulb would be just warm.
    We used Stereo scopes at the place I use to work we had scopes that were 10x to 50x power looking at little parts that go in the hard drives of computers we also used a comparator up to 500 power. But those were big and had Really bright bulbs in them. But ALL scopes on the tables had those round types that screw on the bottom of the scope, and those did a fine job.
    And we had 100's of them at the work place. I wanted to get a used one once but could not get the company to sell me one.
    And if at times you are cranking that baby up to 100 power or more you would want to get as bright a light as possible I would think.
     
  8. emulkahi1

    emulkahi1 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    346
    Joined:
    Apr 21, 2006
    Location:
    Central MT
    Longshadow--

    Could you share with us what you are intending to use the microscope for?

    The reason I ask is because, with your mirror, you would be getting transmitted light (i.e. the light is shining up THROUGH your sample). With the ring illuminator, it will be reflected light (i.e. the light will be shining/reflecting off the top of your sample from overhead, as the light fits around the microscope pod). Which is better depends on what you will be studying.

    As for tungsten vs fluorescent light sources. Your DH is right, the tungsten light would be brighter. But it will also be hotter, like you said. Whether that would be a problem for you would depend on what you're looking at, and how close to the stage the particular illuminator has the bulb. Are you looking at live samples (the heat from the light could 'cook' them if the bulb is too close to the stage plate...)? Fluorescent light, on the other hand, is much cooler and more even. Again, which is better would depend on your application.

    Hope this helps!!

    Erin :)
    edited to add: Also, just looked at the link you provided in your last post. One other clarification that would be important: Do you have a dissecting (also sometimes called a stereo) microscope....or a compound one? I'd assumed in my above response that you had a dissecting microscope as that is what the the ring illuminator mentioned first would fit. However, the tungsten illuminator you linked to fits a compound microscope. That difference is important as a dissecting scope illuminator will not work well on a compound scope, and vice versa.
     
  9. longshadowfarms

    longshadowfarms Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,528
    Joined:
    Nov 26, 2002
    Location:
    Alaska
    [​IMG]

    Just about as plain and simple a microscope as one might find anywhere. I homeschool and the kids will be hitting the high school years very soon so it will be used for biology and whatever else comes up. Just basic looking at stuff ;) For some things, the mirror has worked ok, but for a lot of stuff, it has not been enough light.
     
  10. emulkahi1

    emulkahi1 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    346
    Joined:
    Apr 21, 2006
    Location:
    Central MT
    Ok. So, given what you have there, I would think that the box illuminator that fits under the stage would be your best bet. Because the ring illuminator will shine from above any slides you have on your stage. Since slides are meant to be viewed with light passing through them from underneath, your results with only overhead (reflected) light would be mixed--and probably not very good. That overhead sort of light is meant for looking at 3-D, opaque specimens (like rocks, bugs, flowers, etc) under a dissecting microscope.

    If you do go with the substage illuminator and later find that an overhead light would be helpful, a quick fix is to use one of those desk lamps w/ the flexible necks. Not the most high-tech solution, but it would probably get the job done :).

    In this case, chances are, the hotter tungsten bulb wouldn't put off SO much more heat that it will cause you much of a problem. To be sure, you can just make an effort not to leave it on for very long--especially when/if you are looking at living specimens.

    Of course, you will want to double check the measurements and make sure it will fit onto your microscope alright.

    Anyway, hope this helps!!

    Erin :)