Metal Working Apprentice: Job Change ?'s

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by rio002, Dec 28, 2004.

  1. rio002

    rio002 Well-Known Member

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    Hi all, Time has come after 17 years of the restaurant business (not owning just managing) that DH wants to change jobs. He really wants to work with metal, loved it in high school welding, fabrication etc. and was really good at it. Question is how to get started.......are there standard college courses you need to take? Is it something you can be an apprentice to get the training? Ideas on pay scale? He really wants to go into fabrication, so I'm trying to find out what I can on it for him while he's at the job he has come to dislike for a variety of reasons. Any Suggestions? :cool:
     
  2. moopups

    moopups In Remembrance

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    I would suggest he start it as a hobby, maybe take ina vo-tech night class to learn currant welding methods. I build wrought iron house fixtures, but know it came from many years of skilled crafts before I moved to metal. A couple of site he may use to find ideas are www.backyardmetalcasting.com or www.lindsaybks.com for some link connections.
     

  3. Beeman

    Beeman Well-Known Member

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    I've worked with metal for years. If I were him I would start it as a hobby first. Unfortunately it probably wouldn't work well as a hobby when your fulltime job is in a restaurant. My hands are not the hands of someone you want working in a reaturant, and I'm not just talking about dirt.
    Your post makes it sound like he is looking to be an employee at what he does instead of a business owner. If financially possible I would choose the type of work he really wants to do and start at the bottom and earn while he learns.
     
  4. almostthere

    almostthere Well-Known Member

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    Try your local Sheet Metal Workers union. They have a program that will pay for his training as well as a paycheck with benefits. It really depends what kind of metalworking he wants to do. My dh finished his training, is now a journeyman, and is getting ready to start welding cert classes (to be the instructor). In Indiana the program is 5 yr long program, in other states it is only 4. When you finish you will have an assoc. degree in contruction technology from your local community college, with 5 yrs experience. Now, if he's into artistic type metalworking, this probably won't help much. I know that he fabricates all the ductwork, mostly by hand, and after his training he got quite good at making things out of metal, and he built his bumper for the Ram. As for classes, go to your local comm college, ask if they handle the sheet metal workers, and then ask for pre requesits(sp?) they would reccomend. They might even have a program that he's more interested in than Sheet Metal Working. HTH
     
  5. flaswampratt

    flaswampratt Well-Known Member

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    Alot does depend on what kind of Fab work he wants to do. I operate a welding/Fabricatin business.

    It entails everything from erecting structural steel to fabricating stairs and handrails, truck beds, trailers, heavy equiptment repairs and lots of other hard dirty work.

    And Beeman's comments about his hands are dead on. Embedded dirt and grime, broken fingers, split nails, cuts, gashes, stitches and lets not forget about the absolute blown out thumb from a five pound hammer that even the doctor in the E.R. refused to try and put back together.

    Sore muscles, aching back, stressed out stomach and a 60-72 hour week. If this all souds exciting and he aint afraid of heights, I'd suggest he get a part time job as a helper(don't quit the regular job) in a shop somewhere to get some experience and a taste for the work.

    If he likes it and is a quick learner, he'll be in a position to either hire on full time or find something better in a different type of shop.

    Welding/Fabricating encompasses a myriad of different talents and disciplines. Good luck to him and stay safe.....

    <///><
     
  6. rio002

    rio002 Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for all the suggestions! I did check our Comm. college but the next Welding course doesn't start until Winter 2005 and pretty much just covers the basics at a high price. He's off work the next two days and is going to check a few places near here and see about arranging training/experience in trade for help with whatever they need kind of an OTJ (on the job) deal. lol I have no fear of him quitting his day job before getting something equivicable set up, in his whole life I think he's only been unemployed/between jobs for 3 days and holds each job a min. of 3 years since we've been together--luckily he's really good about that :) As for his hands lol well they sure aren't like the pretty chef hands you see on tv, scars, cuts, burns etc. thank god he has latex gloves at work or else there could be issues :no: I wish we could look at it as becoming business owners but that would currently be like me thinking I could fly a plane because I've traveled in one. Eventually, we would love to own a business we both really enjoyed, this is as close as we've gotten to compromise: he likes metal I like wood but both could be marketed out of the same business. Once again thanks for all the help, I really like it when he says he enjoys going to work (and not just to get away from us :haha: ) :D :cool: