Metal Workers/Welders

Discussion in 'Shop Talk' started by oldudbob, Dec 9, 2004.

  1. oldudbob

    oldudbob Member

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    Any other hobbyist metal workers/welders on this forum? I’ve been doing metal work/welding as a hobby for about 15 years. I have a small shop at home with an AC/DC stick welder, AC stick welder, flux cored wire welder, plasma cutter and various power tools. Most of the project I do use 1/8” to ¼” think material. I’ve built a couple of canoe trailers, utility trailers, a rack to go on the back of my travel trailer, a rack to hold two spare tires under the trailer, etc. I would be interested in exchanging metal working/welding tips with others on this forum.
     
  2. herefordman

    herefordman Well-Known Member

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  3. bumpus

    bumpus Well-Known Member

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    Just go for a bigger job I know you are bored.

    .
     
  4. oldudbob

    oldudbob Member

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    herefordman: Thanks for the link. I will check it out.
     
  5. jackie c

    jackie c Well-Known Member

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  6. Ross

    Ross Moderator Staff Member Supporter

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    We build alot of things with the welder here. headgates for our sheep feeders and pasture gates. We built a 16 foot equipment float, and a few small utility trailers. The TIG sits on a castor wheeled frame we made, the barn has a few heavy steel brackets keepign it standing! We have an Airo ACDC stick TIG with Hi Freq, a Miller MIG and a little Clarke Turbo weld en100 flux core MIG. Propane torches and a Rigid chop saw do the cutting.
     
  7. moopups

    moopups In Remembrance

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    In beautiful downtown Sticks, near Belleview, Fl.
    I build ornamental and decorative house fixtures, such as baby swings, pot and pan racks, ect. Sort of like wrought iron only not with a forge. Alsobuildany thing thatis needed within reason; post puller, livestock trailer, ect.
     
  8. insanity

    insanity Well-Known Member

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    Yep I'm another.Learned on an old stick,and wire feed while working maintenance at a large saw mill.Also used Flux core working for Trinity Marine building barges.(10 bucks an hr,yea they can go fly a kite! :rolleyes: ) All mild steel experience.Hoping to learn to work with aluminum one day.

    Oh man a plasma cutter! I'm drooling now.I'm just working with an old stick,chop saw,and cutting torch if i ever get the darn gas bottles.Haven't had time to play much lately.Ive been looking for a nice used wire feed.(to fire up my interest in making time :D ) And a plasma would really be cool some day.Oh well i guess i can get by with what i have for now. :( Cant really find any body that needs anything special done anyway.And haven't had time or money to build my ideas to sale lately.
     
  9. oldudbob

    oldudbob Member

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    Thanks for the responses. Sounds like we have a few metalworker/welders here. The plasma cutter is very handy, thought I have not used it a lot. I mostly use my chopsaw or circular saw with an abrasive blade to cut metal.

    I have tried to cut 45 degree angles on square and angle stock with little success. Does anyone have a special trick to cutting these angles so that that match up? What is the best piece of equipment to use to cut these angles?

    Anyone with any experience with the use of a coldsaw (chopsway with a metal blade)? A friend of mine just bought one of the new Craftsman saws with the twin blades that is suppose to cut just about anything. It looks like an angle grinder. He has not tried it out yet.

    My latest project is a support that plugs in to my 2" receiver on the back of my pickup. It looks like an L with a 24" cross piece at the top that is the same hight as the canoe rack on the top of the pickup. I will use it when I want to haul 20' lengths of steel. It is made out of 2" square tube. I would post pictures of some of my projects, but I don't think this forum allows that. If anyone is interested E-mail me at oldudbob@yahoo.com and I will E-mail you the pictures.

    If anyone has a travel trailer they may be interested in the double spare time carrier that I made that mounts under the trailer. I made one for myself and one for a friend.

    Anyone working on any interesting projects?
     
  10. BobBoyce

    BobBoyce Well-Known Member

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    My last welding project was a platform for my mobility scooter that plugs into the receiver on the back of my truck.

    Priced new metal and about had a heart attack, so it ended up being fabricated totally from materials out of the scrap metal pile.

    Bob
     
  11. oldudbob

    oldudbob Member

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    BobBoyce: I know what you mean about the cost of steel. I need to find a local scrapyard that will sell me steel by the pound.
     
  12. insanity

    insanity Well-Known Member

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    Best thing Ive tried was a wet band saw,at the saw mill (they also had a cheap dry band saw but it wasn't worth its weight).A little slow,but perfect every time.A friend has one of those $300 hand held Milwalkie (sp?) band saws.It will do it also but its hard to hold steady. :rolleyes:
     
  13. Meg Z

    Meg Z winding down

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    I don't have a stick welder, but I use a Millermatic 185 MIG welder, and oxyacytalene. The Miller will do 1/2 inch without beveling, which is all the power I could ever want. I don't do nearly the welding I used to (Used to have a business called The Iron Maiden), but mostly ornamental stuff...candleholders, furniture, you-draw-it-I'll-build-it custom work. Rebuilt a trailer, made a couple ornamental 6 foot gates, but mostly indoor stuff.

    I cut those 45 degree angles on my bandsaw, as well (dry one, not wet). The thing has an adjustment to hold it at 45 degrees, but some things I have to cut in the 'other' 45 degrees, without being able to turn it over, (Like when I need it in 1 x 2 angle iron) so hubby made me a wooden brace that I can bolt onto the bandsaw to hold the angle. Works pretty good. Come to think of it, hubby gave me the bandsaw, too. It was my 20th wedding anniversary present. :D

    Happy is the woman whose hubby Knows what she wants!
     
  14. Steve in Ohio

    Steve in Ohio Well-Known Member

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    I wouldn't say its a hobby because I've made a living at it for 30yrs..............
    but I was fortunate to get in to the trades at an early age.Back then Industrial Maintenece covered alot of trades including welding and fabrication.I just took to the welding part real quick.Plus being on a farm most of my life we had and still have plenty of weld jobs..........I pefer to TIG weld any day.............got spoiled on The B-1 B project back in the late 70's early 80's.So over the years I have worked on everything from Aircraft parts,coal crushers,ag equipment to chemical and high pressure vessels............and now Welding robots and large hydrostatic presses.
    Here at the farm I have a couple of welders,plasma cutter,torch set.The one I use most is the Miller portable welder.It has the dry-line torch for Tig welding but doesn't have the high freq. for aluminum.I trade stuff for weld jobs with some of the locals............works out good for both of us...............The last job took about 15mins. and the guy gave me a nearly new 25gal gas-caddy with the hose and wheel assembly.
    One thing I would like to add to my shop is a small metal lathe.......hard to find at auctions.........around here anyway.
     
  15. mikell

    mikell Well-Known Member

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    I have a mill lathe welder torches and you name it. Just getting ready to start my railroad it will be 15" gage with about a mile of track. Will be building all the cars and engines. Hope to be operational in 5 years.


    mikell
     
  16. BobBoyce

    BobBoyce Well-Known Member

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    oldudbob, there's a nice little scrap yard near Andrews NC that sells by the pound. They carry all kinds of metals. I unloaded a few thousand lbs of scrap metals on them earlier this year, but I kept all of the scrap metal that I figured was in usable size and shape.

    I built a car tow dolly with a 2" solid steel drop axle, 2" square 1/4" wall tubing draw bar, 2" X 2" X 1/4" braces. The towed vehicle wheel table was made from a section of I-beam salvaged from a mobile home hitch. The wheel table bearings were stacked and greased 1/4" steel plate over a 1 1/2" hardened steel pin made from a piece of broken hydraulic cylinder rod.

    I have built a few utility trailers, and the mounting frame for my PV solar panel array.

    I also built my own mobility scooter.

    All cutting was done with an oxy/acetaline torch, which I do not have anymore. Someone decided they needed it more than I did. I only have the oxygen tank left, since it had been dropped off to be filled at the time. I also had a spare oxy regulator, which I still have.

    My main welder is a Lincoln 225 AC stick welder. I also have a homebuilt 125/250 Amp welder that runs on 120 VAC. I built it out of a pair of old 1500 watt UPS power supply transformers. I have some huge 300 Amp rectifiers to add to my welders if I can ever find some heat sinks big enough to handle it.

    For any of you interested, small lengths of PVC pipe with one fixed and one removable end cap makes for good welding rod storage. I have several marked with the type and size rods inside.

    Bob
     
  17. Ross

    Ross Moderator Staff Member Supporter

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    Mikell you sound like my mechanic! He has a narrow guage rail engine, flatbed "cars" and track. He was going to do the same thing but I suspect the idea is too far off his to do list to ever get done. A shame to see the stuff just rotting away.
     
  18. moopups

    moopups In Remembrance

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    In beautiful downtown Sticks, near Belleview, Fl.
    For whom mentioned needing a lathe, try www.lindsaybks.com for books on how to build your own shop equipment. There is a series of books by Dave Gingerly available at the site. The equipment is fabricated useing off the shelf hardware and home cast aluminum.
     
  19. insanity

    insanity Well-Known Member

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    Hey guys i got a Question for ya.
    I am looking at Hobart welders.To be specific.The 135 wire feed 426 bucks at TSC.Any body have/use one?
    It has to be a 120 volt,and i want to keep it as small and as portable as possible.Also needs to be small and light weight so it will fit on an arm to swing around over head.(like my buddy has rigged up)I have 220 volt stick already for heavy stuff.I just want some thing with enough power to be reliable and all around useful every day.Should i step up another size to be more useful or will that one do it.(I will not be using it every day,or earning a living with it,but i still want a fairly good one.)I will be building most utility trailers,roll bars and such with it. How good are these welders (now a-days) ? Also wondering how easy they are to work on and get parts for them.Like changing the liner. :rolleyes: Ill check to see if TSC can order parts i guess.I like the service at Welders Supply store here better but there high as heck.And also high on there Miller Welders.Yes id rather have a Miller.Or atleast i think i had.

    I love Big Bad Boy Toys but i really need to save money at this time.(wife says so! :rolleyes: ) Hope to buy a larger better mig later.Hence also keeping this one small cheap and portable.
     
  20. BobBoyce

    BobBoyce Well-Known Member

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    Sorry, can't help you there insanity, not sure of the quality or parts availability of that particular machine.

    If you're just looking for a light duty wire feed welder for occasional use, there's loads of cheap ones available, but reliability and parts availability come into question.

    If you're looking for something that will hold up to a lot of use however, you may be better off just spending a bit more and getting one with more capacity, just for those times when you may need it.

    Bob