Metal roof Q... Standing seam vs diamond rib??

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by Dexter, Nov 30, 2009.

  1. Dexter

    Dexter Well-Known Member

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    I can't get any straight answers from builders, roofers or suppliers. Can it be true, that the more money you have the more expensive the roofing you get- even if they all are guaranteed for the same 40 years??

    Is one quieter in storms? (I have NO attic, but will be well insulated).

    Standing seam has hidden fasteners, being more expensive and ugly IMO.
    Diamond rib being basic corrugated roofing, exposed fasteners.

    I am completely clueless what to get here. I will be here long term.
    The standing seam is supposed to be great stuff, but yes it looks to me veryt commercial, takes away from the farmhouse style in my eyes. (maybe it's worth it??)

    Would love to hear your ideas, particularly if you've just gone through this yourself.

    Yes, steel is the way for me, excellent snow shedding capabilities is priceless.

    Is one
     
  2. Common Tator

    Common Tator Uber Tuber

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    I'm no expert but when we redo the roof at our ranch, it will be with metal, so I have been looking at it. There are differences with the thickness or gauge of the metal, and thicker is better. There are differences in the coatings too. I personally would call the roofing manufacturer with a list of your questions.
     

  3. Wendy

    Wendy Well-Known Member

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    We have both. Our old part of the house has standing seam & is still in real good shape. Our house was built in 1930. Not sure how long the roof has been on. Our addition that we just put on we did not use standing seam. Mainly because of the price. Standing seam is supposed to hold up better, but we are happy with what we put on the new addition. You can see the screws, but it's not a big deal. We also would not have anything but a metal roof.
     
  4. Dexter

    Dexter Well-Known Member

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    I called 2 manufacturers. Neither were helpful -I am a layman of course, but all I could get out of them were some profiles cost more than others but all are good.

    But there must be more than that. As salesmen they weren't about to say one was inferior it seemed.
     
  5. agmantoo

    agmantoo agmantoo Supporter

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    I have an 1889 farm house that has a version of standing seam that is original. The farmhouses you have observed are probably dated afterward. Standing seam is far superior to the basic corrugated. The standing seam will not leak if applied correctly. The corrugated has lapped seams and can leak both at the seam and at the fasteners. Normally, standing seam will be 3 times as expensive as other metal roofs. If you want the farmhouse look the standing seam can be had in the galvalume finish which resembles the galvanized tin from times past. I have 3 very large buildings with the corrugated. I do have a couple of small leaks. If I could have justified the price I would have installed a standing seam roof on my home. You will get to where you ignore the noise on whichever version you choose. PS...if you elect to use the corrugated with exposed fasteners make certain that the lengthwise lap joints are caulked with the roll caulking. Otherwise, water under adverse conditions can get through the joints. Also with the painted finish I have observed that where the lengths of metal sheeting were cut with saws, the sawing did create a problem with the painted finish and over time those cut edges rust. You are aware the painted finish will fade over time?
     
    Last edited: Nov 30, 2009
  6. PyroDon

    PyroDon Well-Known Member

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    My personal opinion having installed many would be for a hidden fastener standing seam roof .
    They are less likely to leak lay flat against the decking thus reducing noise
    a bit more expensive but a far better roof in the long run
     
  7. Dexter

    Dexter Well-Known Member

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    Ignore the noise? From my experience if it is on right, the expected noises are actually no greater than shingles. You find it noisy then?
    I've got 3/4" ply, sealant + that roofing blueskin stickers, then beneath will be insulation and drywall or tongue and groove.
     
  8. Michael Kawalek

    Michael Kawalek Well-Known Member

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    I installed my roof three years ago with no problems what so ever.
    [​IMG]
    It was incredibly easy and was only a 2 day job to get all the panels on for both sides.

    I installed regular ribbed panels with rubber gasketed roofing screws. Have had no problems with it at all.
     
  9. Bearfootfarm

    Bearfootfarm This Space For Rent Supporter

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    My house is standing seam, and was built in 1895.
    Maybe they didnt know about "style"
     
  10. springvalley

    springvalley Family Jersey Dairy Supporter

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    Standing seam is a better roof, and has been around over 100 years. I myself would rather have the corragated as that is what all my buildings have.Noise shouldn`t be a big issue, it may be a bit, but not alot. Thanks Marc.
     
  11. Dexter

    Dexter Well-Known Member

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    I know it's old, but it looks very space age to me, very formal, maybe it's the pin striping.
    Thanks for your thoughts here.
     
    Last edited: Dec 1, 2009
  12. GoatsRus

    GoatsRus TMESIS

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    We have a metal roof on our home. We also have a cathedral ceiling in the Living/dining area. The metal was laid over plywood and rafters. There is insulation between the rafters before the inside wood ceiling was installed. We have only heard the rain once in that room in the 8 years we've been here. I think the only reason we did hear it is that it was rain from a tornado and we had lost power, so there was no other noise to muffel the sound.
     
  13. artificer

    artificer Well-Known Member

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    I guess it comes down to style vs. longevity. If I had the money, I would go with the standing seam roof. I'm not really concerned with how it looks, just how well it performs.

    One thing to think about as far as longevity goes, is how is the water kept out. The standing seam roof directs the water down in an unperforated trough. If done correctly, water shouldn't be able to be driven up into the seams. As long as you don't have physical damage, and the coatings hold up, the roof shouldn't leak. Listen to the people that have over 100 year old roofs that are still good.

    On the other hand, the diamond rib roofs are standard on MANY industrial and farm buildings. For agricultural buildings, cheaper almost always wins. With the exposed fasteners, you're relying on the rubber washers to seal all of the perforations. Yes they last a long time without leaking, but 100+ years? Time will tell.

    For noise, either roof is going to be loud if its supported by just the roof stringers/purlins. If the roof is decked, then noise will be less with either. Since you have decking, it shouldn't be a problem.

    Michael
     
  14. salmonslayer

    salmonslayer Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I am getting ready to have a steel roof put on my house in Missouri and it has two layers of really deteriorated shingles (but surprisingly no leaks) and the roof decking is oak planking in good shape (at least from the underside in the attic).

    What are your thoughts on putting the roof over the old shingles? It would be cheaper and I have heard some say the old shingles add another level of waterproofing and noise abatement but I am not so sure if thats true. We dont have any zoning restrictions and by my calculations there wont be a load issue with the weight of the roofing panels.

    Oh yea, one more question if you dont mind. My house is a stone house but the roofing was all framed and decked with oak so its strong, zero rot, no insect damage etc but there are some undulations and irregularities where the oak dried and twisted a bit. Its not bad but will these irregularities show up under the steel roofing panels or would the panels tend to even that out?
     
  15. MushCreek

    MushCreek Well-Known Member

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    Standing seam is better from the standpoint that the screws are protected from the weather. The rubber seals under the screw heads do deteriorate with age, and have to be replaced from time to time, although I don't know how often. We're really talking about 3 different types of roofing here, since several have mentioned corrugated, which is different than standing seam or 'diamond rib', by which I think they mean 5V crimp. Corrugated is probably the cheapest, and most likely to leak.

    You can do metal over old shingles, but you should put down 1X4 purlins to create a drainage plane (metal roofs sweat), and to give a level and solid surface to attach the metal to.
     
  16. agmantoo

    agmantoo agmantoo Supporter

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    The old diamond rib was a term applied to the aluminum sheeting. Today the steel sheeting people use the term to describe what most of us know as corrugated. http://www.idealroofing.com/pages_english/DiamondRib.shtml As you can see from the link I attached that the industry knows there is a problem with the lap joints and this company is trying to market a product to overcome the problem. On any area where a leak could be a disaster this lap joint needs to have roll caulking run the length of the panel
     
    Last edited: Dec 1, 2009
  17. salmonslayer

    salmonslayer Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Thanks MushCreek, I am assuming the purlins would also provide some measure of sound deadening and an insulative quality due to the air gap. I am in South Central Missouri and dont run AC (stone house) so I am also looking for something to help with the solar radiation.
     
  18. Travis in Louisiana

    Travis in Louisiana Clinton, Louisiana

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    Salmonslayer, I just put a metal roof on my house, over the shingles. I used 26 gauge metal. I used longer screws to go through the shingles into the plywood. The metal has ridges every four inches which I hope helps drain the roof sweat water. I wish I would have taken the shingles off though, cause you can see the outline of some of the shingles in the metal. Its not much, but enough. In Montana, I put the metal over the shingles on my cabin. I was told this is how they do it up there and with only two weeks there, that's the way it got done. The roof on my house here in Louisiana is 11 on 12 and 7 on 12 pitch, so it drains well. Just be careful when you put the roof on and rope yourself off. The ladder I made came of its rigging from the back roof and I rode the ladder to the ground, breaking my back and the small bone in my left leg. Not fun at all!!. I only had three screws left and I was going to be finished with the front. So be careful!!
     
  19. nathan104

    nathan104 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    You have to make sure you do not put too much weight on your roof when overlaying a new metal roof over several layers of old shingles. A lot of the older house were framed with only 2x4 rafters. They were true dimensional lumber so stronger than the smaller 2x4's of today, but still cant safely support decking, several layers of singles, and then a new roof over the top, not even including any ice or snow load. Just something to be aware of.

    We are shopping aroundfor a roofer to put a metal roof on our new place. We need to have three layers of old roofing removed before the new roof can go on. under that all there is is 1x4 slats with about 4 inches of gap between them. We have had quotes all over the place. Also have had all different extremes of what is required. Some have told us that they can rip off the old layers and simply lay the metal panels on the spaced 1x4's that are already there. Others have said you have to have insualtion board under the metal panels to stop moisture from accumulating in the attic on the bottom of the panels. Others have said they need to put new decking on the whole roof to put the panels on. Quotes range from $4000 to $8000 for my little roof on a 30x30 ft house.

    Planning on having the roof put on first of january so I really need to find out which way to go. Dont want to spend several thousand extra dollars on something I dont need.
     
  20. salmonslayer

    salmonslayer Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Thanks Travis I am worried about this a bit too and am wondering if the purlins would help with that. Hope your back and leg get better.
    Thats our 1945 house but the roof decking is tongue and groove oak planking in excellent shape. I will probably just take the old shingles off and bite the bullet since I am going to have to address some roof penetrations I am getting rid of anyway but thats quite a spread on prices. I am not sure I would want it just on slats though.