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I traded for a bred Jersey/Holstine 2 year old heifer. She was hand raised and is quite gentle. I plan to milk her and use the milk for the babies. I won't have to cook any more milk. It will go straight from her to the lambar. I'm going to test for Johne's. Anything else I should test for that could be passed to my goats.

By the way, I think she is beginning to think she is a goat.

Ps. I named her Gertrude because of the granny face on the side. Gertrude was/is both of my grandmas names. (Third pic shows the granny)

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I'll bet you covered the normal parasites. Just checking it off of the list. The babies will have their own Dairy Queen.
 

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if at all possible once she freshens. DEHORN HER. It's a hard choice and scary to have the vet do and can be risky. It just sucks to come out to find a dead goat or a busted Legg cause the cow got snippy. I learned the hard way. I lost a 6mth old calf and my breeding buck. Horns are bad.
when is she due?
 

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can you get a butt shot? she seems a little thin and I wonder how her tail head is sitting. What is she bred to? She sure could use a good mineral and a fecal float.
 

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I know that the Ozarks Jewels girls (Emily Dixon) have REALLY low titer counts re: CAE and she gives all of her kids milk from her tested Jersey girls. I do not know if she tests for anything besides Johnes. You could ask her, Doug.
Also, your buck Troupador is looking FABULOUS!! We are not on FB, but still have a connection to Ruth Green and I recently saw photos of him...the baby is sure growing up, too!
 

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She's bred to an Angus bull. Should throw a small calf.

She's due in the spring. I'm not sure when.

She needs wormed. That's the first thing I asked when I got her. The lady just texted yesterday. She had to ask her husband who is on the road. She escaped the last worming. She is thin. She's currently eating a lot of good graze, mixed grass hay and the minerals.

I know a lot more about milk cows than I do goats. I grew up with cows and always helped on my cousins dairy farm.

Did I miss any questions?


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I know that the Ozarks Jewels girls (Emily Dixon) have REALLY low titer counts re: CAE and she gives all of her kids milk from her tested Jersey girls. I do not know if she tests for anything besides Johnes. You could ask her, Doug.

Also, your buck Troupador is looking FABULOUS!! We are not on FB, but still have a connection to Ruth Green and I recently saw photos of him...the baby is sure growing up, too!

I'm really proud of Troubador and he's bred to about 20 girls. Soren, the Goldthwaite buck, is bred to around 10 and Dreamweaver bred 3. Dreamweaver is starting to look pretty impressive too. He's extremely long. I'll post some pictures sometime of my bucks. I would put my bucks against anyone's. (But the offspring will be the tale) I also have another Goldthwaite Buck and a buck out if Janas best doe that I may use on 6 young does if I decide to breed them later. If not they will be used next year. Kidding starts any day now.


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if at all possible once she freshens. DEHORN HER. It's a hard choice and scary to have the vet do and can be risky. It just sucks to come out to find a dead goat or a busted Legg cause the cow got snippy. I learned the hard way. I lost a 6mth old calf and my breeding buck. Horns are bad.
when is she due?
Since she's already got the horns, I wonder if horn weights would solve the problem in a more humane way. Less likely to hook someone or something with a horn if they're turned downward close to her head?
 

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Since she's already got the horns, I wonder if horn weights would solve the problem in a more humane way. Less likely to hook someone or something with a horn if they're turned downward close to her head?

Thought about that too. I hate the horns but I've also helped the vets remove horns on a Charolais farm I worked on. That's a mess and grisly


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I have a neighbor who uses horn weights on his cows - the turned down horns look awfully funny, but he says he likes it better than any of the other options, and it works just as well (though YMMV, obviously).
 

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Those don't look terribly big, could banding still work? What a great idea to do CAE prevention without all the excess milk handling.
 

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I'd probably do a fecal Johnes as well as an ELISA because it is more definitive, but oftentimes animals do not come up johnes + until after their first freshening. I'd retest a few months after freshening, too. Unfortunately by then, she may have exposed your kids if you feed them the raw milk. Just something to consider.
 
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I'd probably do a fecal Johnes as well as an ELISA because it is more definitive, but oftentimes animals do not come up johnes + until after their first freshening. I'd retest a few months after freshening, too. Unfortunately by then, she may have exposed your kids if you feed them the raw milk. Just something to consider.
Interesting, I did not know that. Why do you think that is?

She can expose your goats thru her feces, too, if you hadn't considered that. It looks like you already have her in with them.
 

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Interesting, I did not know that. Why do you think that is?

She can expose your goats thru her feces, too, if you hadn't considered that. It looks like you already have her in with them.
I was just going to point out the same thing.. seeing how she's already in with the goats.. not much to do about that now (except hope for neg. test results)...

Quarantine.. quarantine.. quarantine.. it's my battle cry.. (my sister has recently retired.. she built a house here on the farm).. she and I are starting a flock of icelandic sheep together (buying from a couple of the top breeders in the nation).. even tho the sheep won't EVER be in with the goats.. The ones already here.. the ones coming in late Dec and the ones coming in late spring/early summer.. will ALL go thru a min. of a 3 month quarantine.. (will also draw blood and test them all for OPP as well as testing them all for Johnes)...

good luck
susie
 

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As with any disease, it generally depends on quality of management - reduction of stress and good management can reduce incidence of disease. Mycobacteriums are slow growing with long initial incubation periods generally, and symptoms commonly do not show until a stressful event occurs. They infect the immune system via avoiding destruction by the phagocytic cells - granted they are slow growing so the infection may not be very aggressive. The phagocytic cells consume the mycobacterium, but are unable to degrade it. This inhibits both an effective cell mediated response (ineffective killing) AS WELL as preventing a humoral response (phagocytes cannot break down mycobacterium, which means they cannot present antigens to B cells, which means antibodies are not produced) (antibodies - which is what most immunologic diagnostic tests are measuring) Her being underweight may mean she is more susceptible to shedding bacteria younger, or maybe not - there is also a large genetic component of the animals being investigated too (in that most animals on a farm are exposed, but the infective rate is not anywhere near as high as the exposure level - meaning some animals beat it off/are naturally resistant. Research is ongoing). Generally speaking, parturition allows for significant immune suppression which can allow mycobacteriums to take advantage despite their slow growing nature. Even if the infection gains significant ground at parturition, it may not mean immediate symptoms in close proximity to parturition - it takes time for weight loss, for example.


Multiple disease tests and isolation, isolation, isolation. Thankfully, the transmission risk to adult animals is lower than between young animals, but that does not make it impossible.
 

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My girl Holly was two when we removed her horns. My vet is amazing.She gave her a tranquilizer and numbed the horn area sawed them off at the base then used her horn burner to make sure she did not bleed and the horns will not grow back. I would never take off horn oof an animal with the being awake.
 
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