Medicinal/beneficial herb volunteers

Discussion in 'Home Gardens, Market Gardens, and Commercial Crops' started by PrairieClover, Oct 31, 2017.

  1. PrairieClover

    PrairieClover Well-Known Member

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    Not sure where a thread regarding medicinal herbs belongs...
    Today while puttering around in the yard with the cat and dog I found a mullein plant. Other herb-minded Texans have been telling me this plant is everywhere here but I only remember seeing it growing in Maryland.
    I had been buying it for tea but didn't like the fine powder a particular manufacturer had been cutting it down to, leaving me with a dusty covering in the bottom of the cup. Blech, choke, choke.
     
  2. anniew

    anniew keep it simple and honest Supporter

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    I once picked the dried seed stem of a mullen (to use in a dried flower arrangement), and ended up realizing I was allergic to it...itched all over. As with all herbs you are using for the first time, it's good to try just a little first, to make sure your body will tolerate it. I wouldn't make tea from any herb on the first try, as it is then inside your body.
     

  3. PrairieClover

    PrairieClover Well-Known Member

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    I have harvested or bought and drank mullein for years. I had it growing on our property in MD and would frequently stop and gather mullein plants to dry and harvest for tea. I never had an allergic reaction. Maybe you didn't understand my post but maybe I didn't provide enough information. I use herbs for a lot of different things and have never had any allergic reactions to any of them, for more than 20 years.
     
  4. anniew

    anniew keep it simple and honest Supporter

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    I was advising caution if using something new. It was for other people, not the OP.
     
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  5. haypoint

    haypoint Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I've seen this weed hear and there. The leaf's surface texture and stiff stalk keep animals from consuming it. I started renting a field a few years ago. I added fertilizer and lime to get the soil healthy again. I sprayed Roundup on it a few times and after I got the weeds under control, I rototilled it. Then I cultivated a few times as the residual weed seeds germinated. Then I planted timothy grass. I sprayed the field with some 2,4D to kill broadleaf weeds.
    To my surprise, Common Mullein grew everywhere. The other weeds were killed, but Common Mullein didn't seem effected at all.
    That fuzzy leaf of Mullein is a bit like Comfrey, plant often used as a coffee substitute, so I guess it could be a tea. If you pay the postage, I'll send you 100 pounds of next Spring's Mullein growth, before I give the field another shot of 2,4D. The Timothy is looking great.

    I think anniew was just cautioning others that all herbs contain chemicals and before you inhale, inject, swallow anything new, don't jump into the deep end right off.
     
  6. PrairieClover

    PrairieClover Well-Known Member

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    Right, I get that she was cautioning anyone.
    This is an organic forum here so I'm surprised you'd be using Roundup, probably the biggest NO on organic gardening and food production methods.
    I would definitely not be using anything that came from a field or near a field that was sprayed with that crap, no offense intended. So you'll be feeding animals hay from a field that was sprayed with it too. I'm sorry to hear that. It really is bad stuff. But like I said, this is a branch of the organic forum so talk of using roundup shouldn't be encouraged.
     
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  7. haypoint

    haypoint Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I didn't intend to advocate the use of Roundup for everyone. Just noting that Mullein is hard to get rid of and seeds remain viable for years. I'd never feed my livestock anything that had even a trace of Roundup on it. Your topic is about where this weed/herd is found and medicinal properties of Mullein. Any new growth Common Mullein, next spring, would not contain 2,4D or Roundup, but my intent is not to convince you of anything. Perhaps you could, in this organic gardening section, explain how you maximize your Mullein in the garden. I have never noticed any plant diseases, insect infestations or wildlife damage to Common Mullein, making it ideal for organic crop production.
     
  8. PrairieClover

    PrairieClover Well-Known Member

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    This is an organic forum. Organic forums do not promulgate the use of poisons in any way.

    My initial point was my delight in finding this herb growing in my yard.
    It was not my purpose to explain how I maximize the growth of mullein in my garden.
    I am certain that you and the other poster and I are not seeing eye to eye.
    Like-minded knowledgeable herbalists' comments were more what I was expecting here.
     
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  9. haypoint

    haypoint Well-Known Member Supporter

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    OK. I think your discovery of Common Mullein is wonderful. Looks like it grows in many areas and climates. Must be hearty. Wonderful that you found a local source and can make your own without the awful dust I the bottom of your cup. Congratulations to you!





    l
     
  10. light rain

    light rain Well-Known Member

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    I have a friend in VA that has been drinking mullein tea for some time now to help her asthma. Not only has her asthma been suppressed her IBS has been also. 40 years ago I tried to smoke it to reduce allergies but it was just too unpleasant...
     
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  11. PrairieClover

    PrairieClover Well-Known Member

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    I had not heard of it as being helpful for asthma or allergies but did you try drinking the tea?
    Have you found anything to help your allergies?
    There is a homeopathic tincture I've used for tree pollen and grass pollen allergies, made by a doctor who lives in TX. It works so subtly. The symptoms just decrease and stop. It doesn't dry me up like some medications have, it just makes me feel normal and I can breathe, no headaches, no post-nasal drip, no cough. I think I used it every 4 hours.
     
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  12. light rain

    light rain Well-Known Member

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    I find using a saline nasal wash 1 or 2 times a day really reduces inflamation and the fatigue that goes with it. Also I try to eat kimchi and sauerkraut on a regular basis. Then Florajen3 probiotic. When I say I don't have the time to do the wash or prebiotic foods I find myself not feeling too good...

    I am curious to the ingredients in the tincture.
     
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  13. PrairieClover

    PrairieClover Well-Known Member

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    Since it is homeopathic for seasonal allergies for Texas, most of the ingredients (and there are a lot) are from the trees, grasses and weeds found in TX. I am not on the homeopathic wagon full tilt but this particular brand did work for us. I have tried to search for it online and can't find it; the little herb store I used to get it from has closed down. (Old age and wally world).
    Unfortunately, I think they stopped making it.
     
  14. copperhead46

    copperhead46 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I live in N/E Oklahoma and we have lots of Mullin. It usually grows where the soil is "poor", My mom use to tell me that they would smoke it for treatment of bad lungs, (whatever that is) and to make a tea from it for congestion.
     
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  15. Forcast

    Forcast Well-Known Member

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    Not a plant but i found unpolished Baltic Amber necklace and brackets would for pain. The lighter the better. Im wearing butter color.
     
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  16. chtirob

    chtirob New Member

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    Interested in knowing more about this tincture...can you share the info on where to obtain it
     
  17. chtirob

    chtirob New Member

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    I see I missed some posts that it’s no longer available
     
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  18. PrairieClover

    PrairieClover Well-Known Member

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    I have never heard of that! I've been wearing copper with other metals, twisted ring and bracelet because I get pain at work in my fingers and hand sometimes. I know it works because when I don't wear it, I end up with achy fingers and a pain in my hand.
     
  19. Forcast

    Forcast Well-Known Member

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    Friends baby had open heart surgery. A doc gave her as a gift the baby amber teething pain necklace. It help her so much she need very little pain meds. Thats how I found out about amber. So I have been wear ing necklace and brackets for a month and have been able to cut my pain meds way down. I tried the copper, and magnets. They were short lived on me. Look for the lightest color Baltic Amber butter. Mine came from Lithuania.
     
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