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I read not that long ago that a politician in Florida was fighting to stop the RKBA violations against MM card holders.

Does anyone know how he's fighting this? Is it as discrimination against civilians? Government employees aren't above the law, and as such, when any of them fails any type of drug test they should also be disarmed, professionally and personally. This would include cops, gov building security, and soldiers. It's only fair. Thoughts?
 

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RKBA, right to keep and bear arms. I had to look it up.
MM is medicinal marijuana.


I think he means Nikki Fried.


"Nikki Fried, who runs Florida's Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, is suing the Biden administration over a federal law that prohibits marijuana users from possessing guns. Fried, who is the only Democrat among Florida's statewide elected officials and is seeking the Democratic nomination for governor, argues that the ban violates the Second Amendment and a congressional spending rider that bars the Justice Department from interfering with state medical marijuana programs."
 

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I read not that long ago that a politician in Florida was fighting to stop the RKBA violations against MM card holders.

Does anyone know how he's fighting this? Is it as discrimination against civilians? Government employees aren't above the law, and as such, when any of them fails any type of drug test they should also be disarmed, professionally and personally. This would include cops, gov building security, and soldiers. It's only fair. Thoughts?
As long as marijuana is on the DEA Schedule of Drugs, there’s no way around it. As it stands today, federal law gives the DEA regulation power over drug scheduling, and federal law also gives itself regulatory controls over something that the constitution specifically says that it has no power to regulate.

Neither hurdle is constitutional, but both are extent, nonetheless. It’s a case of two wrongs making a wrongerer.
 

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As long as marijuana is on the DEA Schedule of Drugs, there’s no way around it. As it stands today, federal law gives the DEA regulation power over drug scheduling, and federal law also gives itself regulatory controls over something that the constitution specifically says that it has no power to regulate.

Neither hurdle is constitutional, but both are extent, nonetheless. It’s a case of two wrongs making a wrongerer.
My biggest problem with our government right now is that we allow our legislature to delegate responsibilities to isolated bureaus within the executive branch. And this guy makes my case for dissolving the DEA entirely...

 
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Sounds like the dispensaries need to get their lawyers on this.
That doesn’t do anything. Not trying to be a nay-sayer, but the whole thing is illegal, and isn’t even built on logic, so no amount of arguing it from a civil-rights standpoint will do any good.

Marijuana is listed as Schedule 1, which is the category for drugs at high risk for abuse which also have no known medical benefits. Putting aside the gaping medical marijuana card loophole exploited by pot heads nationwide, it has been prescribed to 10s, if not 100s, of thousands of genuinely ill people. It clearly has at least some legitimate medical purpose, yet it remains on Schedule 1.

Even moving it to another slot on the Schedule doesn’t solve the issue, though, because the MJ question on Form 4473 states that ANY illegal user of any “regulated drug” is a prohibited person. At the federal level, if MJ remains regulated, anyone who uses it without a prescription would be ineligible to purchase a firearm.

Moving it to Schedule 2+ would at least lift the jeopardy from people who currently have a valid prescription for it, but, in my opinion (as a non-MJ user), that still doesn’t address the fundamental problem: neither the word “recreational” nor “drug” shows up any where in my copy of the 2nd Amendment.

We can try to put bandaids on the breach of civil liberties, but having the government in a regulatory role, at all, means that the breach can’t be healed.
 

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I personally wouldn't want a pot smoker, legal or illegal, on the road. It is certain some 'legal' smokers abuse the priviledge. If they can legally smoke and drive there is no reason a guy getting off work can't legally open a beer and drink it on his way home.
 

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I personally wouldn't want a pot smoker, legal or illegal, on the road. It is certain some 'legal' smokers abuse the priviledge. If they can legally smoke and drive there is no reason a guy getting off work can't legally open a beer and drink it on his way home.
Would much rather share the road with a pothead than a drinker. Usually if you honk the horn they will realize the stop sign doesn't need to be green for them to go. All in all probably safer than somebody that needs a cigarette and doesn't have one.
 

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Would much rather share the road with a pothead than a drinker. Usually if you honk the horn they will realize the stop sign doesn't need to be green for them to go. All in all probably safer than somebody that needs a cigarette and doesn't have one.
I think I agree generally, but there's a difference between a little high and burnt out. My pothead roommate way back in the day once drove over a mailbox right after saying "nah weed doesn't affect driving". I was like, "does it affect sleeping...?" lmao That was a long afternoon.
 
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I personally wouldn't want a pot smoker, legal or illegal, on the road. It is certain some 'legal' smokers abuse the priviledge. If they can legally smoke and drive there is no reason a guy getting off work can't legally open a beer and drink it on his way home.
Stay out of Columbus, Ohio. Since Ohio legalized medical mj I have not made a single trip into the city without smelling the odor of mj coming from a passing car. There are a lot of accidents and traffic fatalities in Columbus.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Stay out of Columbus, Ohio. Since Ohio legalized medical mj I have not made a single trip into the city without smelling the odor of mj coming from a passing car. There are a lot of accidents and traffic fatalities in Columbus.
This sounds too much like the gun-grabbers "There'll be blood running in the streets in constitutional carry states" Which of course, we know was completely wrong. Please provide some sources to backup your claims.
 

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Stay out of Columbus, Ohio. Since Ohio legalized medical mj I have not made a single trip into the city without smelling the odor of mj coming from a passing car. There are a lot of accidents and traffic fatalities in Columbus.
I'm sure since the smell is obvious, and it shows up in blood, if people are causing accidents while using cannabis, they are getting tickets for DUI. Last I checked, people are pretty bad at driving even when not using mind altering substances, which include many prescription medications.
 

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This sounds too much like the gun-grabbers "There'll be blood running in the streets in constitutional carry states" Which of course, we know was completely wrong. Please provide some sources to backup your claims.
Ride along with me some time. You'll smell it.


"List of car accidents by state
South Carolina - 12.0% of drivers have an at-fault accident on record

Massachusetts - 11.9% of drivers have an at-fault accident on record

Ohio - 11.4% of drivers have an at-fault accident on record

Nebraska - 10.6% of drivers have an at-fault accident on record

Georgia - 10.6% of drivers have an at-fault accident on record

Maryland - 10.5% of drivers have an at-fault accident on record

Maine - 10.5% of drivers have an at-fault accident on record

North Carolina - 10.0% of drivers have an at-fault accident on record

Iowa - 9.7% of drivers have an at-fault accident on record

Indiana - 9.6% of drivers have an at-fault accident on record"

That was in August this year. Note that Ohio is number 3 on the list.

Ohio has a bad habit of allowing impaired drivers to plea bargain. I have sat in on a few court sessions and heard it happen. Of course we have a "3 strikes rule" for impaired drivers but it is really easy to get a plea bargain several times which results in no record of impaired driving.
 

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I'm sure since the smell is obvious, and it shows up in blood, if people are causing accidents while using cannabis, they are getting tickets for DUI. Last I checked, people are pretty bad at driving even when not using mind altering substances, which include many prescription medications.
Blood THC levels do not indicate impairment. A good lawyer can easily get that information tossed.

"Marijuana, on the other hand, does not behave so predictably. Studies have shown that how much a person feels the effects of marijuana actually lags behind the peak levels of THC detected in their blood. This means there is no correlation between the level of THC present in a driver’s blood and how impaired they may be. The lack of correlation between THC levels and a person feeling high means someone with a lower level of THC in their blood could actually be more impaired than someone with a higher THC level."


Columbus police do not often respond to non-injury accidents. If the cars are operable and no one is injured and you call the police they tell you to exchange information and file a report online. In 4 of the accidents in which I was not at fault the police refused to respond. How can a cop determine if a person is impaired if they do not respond?
 

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Blood THC levels do not indicate impairment. A good lawyer can easily get that information tossed.

"Marijuana, on the other hand, does not behave so predictably. Studies have shown that how much a person feels the effects of marijuana actually lags behind the peak levels of THC detected in their blood. This means there is no correlation between the level of THC present in a driver’s blood and how impaired they may be. The lack of correlation between THC levels and a person feeling high means someone with a lower level of THC in their blood could actually be more impaired than someone with a higher THC level."


Columbus police do not often respond to non-injury accidents. If the cars are operable and no one is injured and you call the police they tell you to exchange information and file a report online. In 4 of the accidents in which I was not at fault the police refused to respond. How can a cop determine if a person is impaired if they do not respond?
Those dirty potheads, causing all those accidents in which no one is injured and the car is still operable.
 

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Those dirty potheads, causing all those accidents in which no one is injured and the car is still operable.
You missed the point. There is no way of knowing if a driver is impaired if the police don't respond.

Here's an article about the increase in accidents in states where marijuana was legalized.

 
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