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Hi, I'm new here :) I've been considering getting a couple of meat does to raise a few kids for the freezer/&sale each year. Now the problem - I can't decide what TYPE of meat goat I want to get. I like the spanish goats but have heard some negitive things about them (not meaty enough/too spindly). I'm not sure I like Boers but everyone I've talked to seems to like them, and I've really heard nothing about Kikos, or Myotonics.

Opinions anyone? One other thing to keep in mind is cost... I have a guy who wants to sell me 4 purebred (very nice pedigreed too) boers for $1600, 3 of them are pregos and the 4th is a youngster. Would this be a good deal? I didn't really want to spend a small fortune to get a few meat goats.

On the other hand I could just get a few more milkers and forget about the meat goats...other than a few bucks now and again.

Thanks everyone!
 

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Well, you seem to have touched on all of your options. Its mostly up to you....

How many milkers do you have now? Do you eat the babies now? If so, do you want more meat in addition to baby meat?

I've never had meat goats of any kind, but I hear that....

with the myotonics, the meat and whatnot really depends on the strain you have. I also hear the ones that freeze alot are the most muscled, but that they are also the most vulnerable to predetors. (makes sense, no?)

the kikos are very hardy and meaty.

Have you heard of the savannah goats, or the tennessee meat goats? Those are the only other breeds I've heard of; maybe there're more...?

:)
 

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If three of the does are bred, (confirmed bred, or just exposed to the buck?), they are registered fullbloods of good bloodlines, then this is a very fair price. You will be probably be able to sell the best buckling born for the purchase price of his dam. Of course, you may want to keep him (out of the best doe, too) to breed back to your girls next year. So you save on a buck right there.

As everyone knows on this forum, make sure you purchase CAE negative and CL Free stock. And obviously healthy, wormed etc. If you want to reduce your initial expenditure, just buy the 3 bred does for $1200 (if they are priced $400 each). You'll have your own doelings to grow your herd in a few short months.

P.S. We like the Boers. Very hardy, lots of meat, easily produce twins and triplets. And they are sooo pretty. :) Plus, when you want to add an animal/get a new buck, there are more quality Boers readily available.
 

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Well, you seem to have touched on all of your options. Its mostly up to you....


I've never had meat goats of any kind, but I hear that....

with the myotonics, the meat and whatnot really depends on the strain you have. I also hear the ones that freeze alot are the most muscled, but that they are also the most vulnerable to predetors. (makes sense, no?)

the kikos are very hardy and meaty.

:)
FALSE on the ones that lock up the most. Good marketing claim though.

I'm finding from those I sell purebred bucks to, a composite breed is the best (myotonic buck on a kikoxspanish doe comes to mind here)

Hybrid vigor is a good thing :)

Andrea
www.arare-breed.net
www.faintinggoat.net
 

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I am sold on and would recomend savannas or savanna crosses. They are lower maintenance and have good maternal instincts like the kiko, but are built more like the boer. If you mainly want them for meat for yourself and to sell a few at market, I wouldn't rule out a cross of two meat breeds. Hybrids often grow faster and are hardier. My buck is 1/2 savanna 1/4 boer 1/4 kiko. He will be 2 years old in february. We bought him at 3 months old and he has only been wormed once and has only had hay or pasture since we got him. We sold some of his kids last year at 10 weeks weighing 45-50 lbs raised on moms milk and pasture only. Google savanna, they come a lot more impressive than ours.



 

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There's been several articles in the Goat Rancher magazine about crossbreds and the cross that tested best in rate of gain and meat quality was a Boer buck with Spanish does. I don't know, I don't eat them and I don't have Spanish goats. I've had really nice, fast growing kids from a Boer/Nubian cross. Dairy does have a lot of milk for putting good weight on the meatier kids.
 

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Hi, I'm new here :) I've been considering getting a couple of meat does to raise a few kids for the freezer/&sale each year. Now the problem - I can't decide what TYPE of meat goat I want to get. I like the spanish goats but have heard some negitive things about them (not meaty enough/too spindly). I'm not sure I like Boers but everyone I've talked to seems to like them, and I've really heard nothing about Kikos, or Myotonics.

Opinions anyone? One other thing to keep in mind is cost... I have a guy who wants to sell me 4 purebred (very nice pedigreed too) boers for $1600, 3 of them are pregos and the 4th is a youngster. Would this be a good deal? I didn't really want to spend a small fortune to get a few meat goats.

On the other hand I could just get a few more milkers and forget about the meat goats...other than a few bucks now and again.

Thanks everyone!

The only caution I can give is that you will never reclaim your cash if you spend 400.00 a goat. If your raising them for your freezer it may not matter to you. Sometimes the high initial expense is worth it. But if you plan on selling them off farm or worse at auction for meat papers/ champion status doesn't matter. Just the muscling and size. Tho, these can be affected by breeding.

What I'd suggest you do... Now this is just free advise and you get what you pay for. :)

1. Buy a few grade nannies paying about 80.00 to 100.00 for them, Get ones that are large and look fairly muscled. You want the ones that don't have that Dairy look.

Get the bulkiest buck you can. Spend your money on him. Even if he is 500 or so. Get the best you can afford.

This should keep your cost under 1000.00 for 5-7 goats. If they do well you might break even in 3 or 4 years.

Your breed question..
Boer breed helps because at auction the Boer look gets more money. Not breeding but coloration. Kinda like a black cow is an angus/ a white goat with a brown head is boer. They are thought to give more meat per pound live weight. Perception at the sale is what matters.

P.S. Only get as many goats you can feed for free, Excess high quality hay is a must. If you have to buy hay you will lose money. If you have to buy grain/feed you may put a few dollars in your pocket. If you just have to buy mineral and supplements you could have a very profitable venture if properly managed.
 

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I like a boer/nubian cross bred back to a boer.The kids grow and sell well. I have fullblood boer, and boer/kiko and the nubian/boer so far the boer/nubian seem to be the best and hardiest.There seems to be a learning curve in goats and it is better to learn on less expensive stock. I bought 4 fullblood boer does and a buck and paid quite alot for them when I first started. Of those I have one left.They were not worm resistant at all and I lost 2 and sold one.The one I kept is the only one who didn't have worm problems. Of course I am in the south and or worm problems are a bit different but it was an expensive lesson for me. I would spend the money on the best boer buck I could buy though.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thank you everyone for your opinions :) I normally have 4-6 goats at a time but I'm down to just 2 and neither are milking right now. Basically I guess it just depends on what I'm after :) Thank you again for all the great info!
 
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FALSE on the ones that lock up the most. Good marketing claim though.

I'm finding from those I sell purebred bucks to, a composite breed is the best (myotonic buck on a kikoxspanish doe comes to mind here)

Hybrid vigor is a good thing :)

Andrea
I've only had 2 fainters, one was a young adult doe, the other was a geriatric doe looking for TLC and a nice place to pass away at. They were from different sources, but both were biters. The younger doe went to the freezer and the old gal hung around less than a year before she passed away.

I don't know if that's a common issue in the breed or if I just got "lucky".

I've had a few Boers and really like them. My fullblood doe is very calm and gentle. Great on the milk stand, too. I've had 2 bucks... one was much like my doe, very nice boy and very polite with the ladies. Then there was Peete. Led well, but very destructive to fencing & shelter, unpredictable with other males, very rough with does. Peete was fed to the dogs...bloodlines be darned.

The half-Boer kids are quite meaty... a nice middle-ground to adding a Boer herd or adding more dairy does would be to add one nice Boer buck. Freshen the does that you want a replacement out of with your dairy buck, everyone else freshen with the Boer. Only one additional mouth to feed and you get better meat kids.

edit: regarding getting the "bulkiest" buck.. don't go crazy on that. Peete was an ox (not fat..heavy bone, well-muscled), but his chest was too deep and his legs were too stocky. Tall does were out of the question! The 2 moderate/smaller does he was bred to were a challenge for him to reach. My good buck was moderately built, but threw the meatiest kids and could breed *any* doe.
 

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edit: regarding getting the "bulkiest" buck.. don't go crazy on that. Peete was an ox (not fat..heavy bone, well-muscled), but his chest was too deep and his legs were too stocky. Tall does were out of the question! The 2 moderate/smaller does he was bred to were a challenge for him to reach. My good buck was moderately built, but threw the meatiest kids and could breed *any* doe.
I've heard the stories of buckling's breeding full size does at 4 months, so size really isn't an issue in that regard. That said,
If your boar had the deep center cavity he was most likely a boar/Nubian cross. From back in his lineage. African Boar don't have that deep center chest. Their front bottom is kinda low, tho. One easy way to tell is let them have horns. :p If they don't slide back kinda right next to their head with a slight twist..... They aren't pure they were bred "pure". For instance you can have a registered Nubian, crossed with a 90% boar/Nubian cross(considered pure bred). This will give you a 50% doe, right. Then take a doe from that cross and breed it to the original 90%, that will give you goats that are now 75% one more generation they will be considered "pure" but in fact they are still 20% something else. If they were ever really anything but a a cross. So papers can show true breeding but registration doesn't.
 

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It's BOER..... NOT BOAR! A Boer is a goat a boar is a pig... For heaven's sake learn the difference if you're going to spout advice! It gives what you say a little more credibility.
Love the attack on the poster not the info..... Do you raise pure bred or create a breed? :kissy:

Those that cast stones aren't generally pure of heart. :croc:
 

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Those Boers are a fair price if they come with papers and are CL/CAE free. For someone who just wants a few meat kids for the freezer and milk for the family, it might be a good idea to get a Boer buck and dairy does. Boers make nice meaty babies when crossed with Nubians or even La Manchas. I've never read the statistics on the Boer Spanish cross, but my doe, Isis is huge. Her sire was a Boer/Spanish and her dam a La Mancha. She always made nice meaty kids whether she was bred Boer or dairy. She milked pretty good as well.
 

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Those Boers are a fair price if they come with papers and are CL/CAE free. For someone who just wants a few meat kids for the freezer and milk for the family, it might be a good idea to get a Boer buck and dairy does. Boers make nice meaty babies when crossed with Nubians or even La Manchas. I've never read the statistics on the Boer Spanish cross, but my doe, Isis is huge. Her sire was a Boer/Spanish and her dam a La Mancha. She always made nice meaty kids whether she was bred Boer or dairy. She milked pretty good as well.
Hey, Did your bucks top out at 300LBS? My neighbor had a herd brought up from the original herd in Texas. He paid in excess of $2000 per goat plus shipping and had to buy 25 :eek:. Crazy!!!. Now I'm no pure bred guy. I like what works. But these goats are huge. They looked like big horn sheep in size only different horns. The bucks hind was better than 18" across he stood at almost eye level with me and I'm 6'. These look nothing like the crosses I see as being passed off as "pure" these were massive goats, the crosses not so much.

P.S. you do know the original goats from SA were dual purpose, they gave good milk. The crosses with milkers mostly gave a thinner frame and smaller rear. The thing that happened is the real ones were so expensive they were first crossed with the spanish, which cut down on the milk production. Then they we crossed with the nubian to get more milk so what is out their now is mostly a kinda meaty/low milk goat. Not the original at all. The original was quite different. It a real shame that this selection was lost.
 

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P.S. you do know the original goats from SA were dual purpose, they gave good milk. The crosses with milkers mostly gave a thinner frame and smaller rear. The thing that happened is the real ones were so expensive they were first crossed with the spanish, which cut down on the milk production. Then they we crossed with the nubian to get more milk so what is out their now is mostly a kinda meaty/low milk goat. Not the original at all. The original was quite different. It a real shame that this selection was lost.
There are still many "true" Boer goats out there. But the breeders had to consider that milk was an important as size, and many folks just wanted bigger and bigger goats. They lost not only correct structure (good feet and legs to support that goats going out to pasture and back, even heavily bred) but also the milk and the udder (ever see those nasty pendulum udders that are attached at the top with a rubber band? EWWWW!)

Our Boers milk very well and for 5 or 6 months (feeding quads very nicely too.) Very high in butterfat. Of course they can't compete with our Saanens for quantity and length of lactation, but we don't expect them to. Saanens hae been bred for generations to give lots of milk for long periods of time - and while correct conformation is important, the meat side of things is not.

I think it is a mistake to paint all animals within a given breed with too broad a brush. Look at the animals themselves and judge based on that. Otherwise it is like comparing some poor sale barn Nubian to a well-bred Nubian. They both give milk, but the similarities end there.

Finally, there is a difference between Fullblood Boers (100% Boer, whether South African or Australian) and Purebreds. Purebreds have some dairy or Spanish goat in them....even if they are 99.99999% Boer they are called Purebreds, not Fullbloods. Similar to American (not 100% pure Togg, let's say) vs. Purebred (which means 100% Togg with no intermixing of any other dairy breed). And the horns are not an accurate way to determine if your Boer is a Fullblood or a Purebred. Check his papers - know your breeder.
 
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