materials to do a walkway on the cheap?

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by GoatsRus, Apr 15, 2010.

  1. GoatsRus

    GoatsRus TMESIS

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    We have a "path" that goes from our cement slab in front of the garage around the house to a stone walkway. The "path" was created from a normal flow of walking traffic around the house do to the dogs mostly, but also from us. since we have clay soil, grass refuses to grow because it's compacted. The "path" is about 50' long. Any suggestions as to how to create a "cheap" walkway that will blend well with the cement slab and the stone walkway we've laid to the gazebo. BTW, stone is out do to the (1) expense and (2) my DH threatened to leave if I ever made him lay out another stone walkway !:walk:
     
  2. AnnieinBC

    AnnieinBC Well-Known Member

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    We have the same problem here...also clay soil. It is the "path" from the house down to our barn....this year I hope to dig out several inches of the clay, line it with landscape fabric, then start shovelling crushed gravel on there.

    I hope it works....might that work for you? I don't think it will be too expensive. We would need to take the pickup truck to get the gravel.
     

  3. okiemom

    okiemom Well-Known Member

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    what about mulch? it composts and would have to be replaced somewhat often, but it would help the soil soften up for when you decide on a perment option.

    put flag stones down in a stepping loose style and put mulch around them to level up the height and use logs or edging to keep the mulch in.

    I also like pea gravel. it can be a slipping hazzard on concrete. I can't keep gravel where it is supposed to be.
     
  4. GoatsRus

    GoatsRus TMESIS

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    i thought about mulch because it's pretty reasonable when we buy it by the scoop. I really want something more permanent because this path will never go away. I have landscape fabric under the stone walkway with sand/pea gravel in between the stones. I'm not crazy about it because I constantly get weeds in between the stones. I planted creeping thyme but the weeds seem to get more each year and it's hard to kill them without harming the thyme. I'm not sure if I'd have the same weed problem with crushed gravel.
     
  5. beewench

    beewench Well-Known Member

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    I saw a really cool pathway made from really thinly sawed log rounds...like 4-5 inches thick and then buried a couple of inches in the ground. It was beautiful, and its permiable...google log stepping path pictures and you should be able to find it...
    I plan on doing this in the walkways of my garden...you can mow over them too!

    -=Sarah
    www.beewench.blogspot.com
     
  6. HillsideWayCSA

    HillsideWayCSA Well-Known Member

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    A fun cheap way to make a path (if you help out the hubby might not leave) is to make your own cement bricks using baking tin foil pans (like you find at the dollar store or walmart cooking isle). A bag of the just add water cement is pretty cheap and goes a long way and all you need is a 5 gallon bucket just toss in a couple scoops of the cement add water and mix till it's smooth and pour in the tin foil pans. You can add color and shells or fancy rocks or do the hand print thing or heck even dog prints are fun (just wash quickly so the cement doesn't stick to their feet).

    Just an idea. I've done this a couple of times before and it's always cheap and easy. The blocks work great for all kinds of odd jobs.
     
  7. JuliaAnn

    JuliaAnn Well-Known Member

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    Treated 1x6" corrall boards make an excellent boardwalk. We have had one down for about 12 years now, and it is still solid and looks good. Only maintenance is once a year I scrub it with bleach when I do the siding on the house, and then put some oil based stain on it every 2 or 3 years.
     
  8. Scomber

    Scomber Well-Known Member

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    That sounds like two yards of Concrete: 50' x 3' x 4". That's below the 5 yard minimum I'm used to hearing about, but if you have another project that will use the other three yards (or if concrete supplier have different rules there) then just pouring concrete may be the simplest thing and cheapest too once you include your own labor. And it's really not that hard to do. Pour it, screed it level, wait a little bit, trowel the top more or less smooth, trowel in control joints, and give it a light broom finish. Keep it covered and moist for a few days.

    Dan
     
  9. MELOC

    MELOC Master Of My Domain

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    wooden beams pinned to the ground with rebar filled with river stone and maybe sand to help stabilize yhem.
     
  10. plowjockey

    plowjockey Well-Known Member

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    If you live near a city, check with the street dept. to see if they will be replacing any sidewalks, this summer. If you can get to the slabs, they should easily bust into smaller "stones", as sidewalks dont often use any steel reinforcement.

    Lay the pieces out as "flagstones" along your path. When the grass dies underneath, dig out the dead area, so the stone will sit at ground level.

    Plan it right and it will look good.

    Sorry, missed this part. Maybe other's could use the idea.

     
    Last edited: Apr 15, 2010
  11. Callieslamb

    Callieslamb Well-Known Member

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    I think crushed rock is your best bet. Anything not set in concrete is going to shift and soon you would have an uneven walkway needed to be 'redone'. Crushed rock will pack down - think of the stuff they use to use on High school tracks. It comes in several colors, isnt' expensive, but you would want some kind of edging to keep it in place.
     
  12. farmmom

    farmmom Well-Known Member

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    I have a friend that made a very attractive walkway with a mold she got somewhere and bags of Quickcrete. When it was almost dry, she sprinkled the top with pebbles.
     
  13. ronbre

    ronbre Brenda Groth Supporter

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    i bought a pathmate cobblestone mold for concrete and have use it for entire patios and small pathways..each is about 24/24 and uses about one small quickrete bag..you can do them in your leisure time..i mixed it bag by bag as i needed it in a roll around mixer that mixes one bag
     
  14. MariaAZ

    MariaAZ Suburban Homesteader

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    This is exactly what I was thinking. I saw a patio done with broken pieces of concrete laid with the smooth side down and the rough side up. It looked awesome!
     
  15. clovis

    clovis Well-Known Member

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    I've seen short pathways made from the lumber that can be salvaged from used pallets.

    It doesn't last forever, but if you have the time, it sure is cheap.

    Pry or cut off the top boards, cut them to length, and renail them to the runners. Leave a one inch overhang on both sides.

    I've seen this done, and done right, it is attractive.
     
  16. Joshie

    Joshie Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Grrr, HT isn't letting me post.... I'll try this again.

    Many years ago, when I lived in town, I had a neighbor who had a short retaining wall made of flagstone. He wanted the flagstone removed; I wanted the flagstone. We made a bargain. I'm a very small woman but I dug those stupid stones out of his yard. It took me several days to a week to accomplish this. I drove them the half block or so to our house. I laid them in our backyard by cutting the shape of each flagstone in our yard. I wanted them to be flush with the yard to make it easier to mow.

    So....... don't break your promise to your hubby. Lay the stone yourself.

    Another option would be something like decomposed granite. Some kind of sand or pea gravel would also be a possibility.

    There is no option that will be especially easy or labor free.
     
  17. cowboy joe

    cowboy joe Hired Hand

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    What about creating a 'stepping stone' walk by laying down a mulch bed, then adding pavers or handmade stone (i.e. using a cooblestone mold). Thinking this is easier to layout as it is random, maintain, and less expensive. BTW, some towns, at least where I am, offer free mulch to residents. Might want to check with your town to see if they offer the same.
     
  18. Mike in Ohio

    Mike in Ohio Well-Known Member

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    Wood chips!

    I made a nice path through the woods out back for DW out of them. Find out who does tree trimming for your local electric utility. They will provide them free and deliver. The only downside for many people is that they do it in 10 yard or larger loads. This will cover 10'x100' about 3-4 inches deep.

    I'm getting ready to get another load dumped next to my drive.

    Mike
     
  19. GoatsRus

    GoatsRus TMESIS

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    Wow, thanks guys. This has been great. I'm liking the board ideas (thanks Beewench & JuliaAnn) and that may work. We have a log sided house and kind of want the walk to blend with the landscape. I love these projects, but I'm a pretty hard task master (thanks to my dad!) and since I can't do really heavy lifting, my DH gets to do all the heavy work! We can scrape out the walkway with the tractor bucket just like we did for the stone walkway and lay the wood flush with the grass. I'm thinking the dogs would probably walk on the wood more than they would the stone. The reason I say that is we have a stone driveway and they have another path they've made through the grass parallel to the drive because they'd rather not walk on the stone....wimps!
     
  20. Backfourty,MI.

    Backfourty,MI. Katie Supporter

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    From the back garage door around to the patio I edged in the area I wanted, put down landscape fabric, stepping stones for the actual path & then filled in with mulch around all the stepping stones. It didn't cost that much to do & here we can get a trailer load of mulch for $15.00, so about every other year so far I have added some more mulch to fill in where it's blown away, etc.

    I also made a setting area in that same space && have a few things planted in an area so it is kinda like an additional little garden area leading to the patio.