'Mater spots.....

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by Kee Wan, May 30, 2006.

  1. Kee Wan

    Kee Wan Well-Known Member

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    I think that there is something wrong with the tomato plants that I have in the garden. They all have spots on all the leaves. Brown, dead, spots. Some look like they are holes all the way through ringed in brown-dead leaf matter - others are solid - but dead leaf spots on teh leaves....

    What is this?? It happened at the end of the season last year too.....But I had almost all my maters in then....

    What can I do to stop this What can I do to prevent it.....

    None of the mater plants in planters in front have anything wrong with them, only the ones in the raised bed in back.....

    Help! :help: :help: :help:
     
  2. skruzich

    skruzich Well-Known Member

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    sounds like blight.
     

  3. Kee Wan

    Kee Wan Well-Known Member

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    What's to be done for it? Ar eth eplants just lost - or can I save something????? How do I prevent the rtwo plants in the garden without it from getting it??
     
  4. Pony

    Pony STILL not Alice Supporter

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    It's in the soil, and there's really no way to get rid of it -- just control it.

    Mulch under and around the plants helps a great deal, because it is spread as soil splashes up on the plants with watering and rain.

    Pony!
     
  5. Kee Wan

    Kee Wan Well-Known Member

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    Here's what I did. I went and got a anti-fungal and sprayed the plants. I removed the spotted leaves. I top-dressed the soil wiht sterile mix and then covered with new mulch.....

    Last fall, the leaves that were spotted spread ove the whole plant - but when I cleaned off all the spotted ones, it didn't spread.....

    Hopefully, this will fix the problem.

    On the really small plants, I took off, probably, the bottom half of the leaves - on teh larger ones it was the bottom third of bottom quarter.

    Suppose that will do it????I'm gonna be BUMMED!!! if I loose all my plants.....
     
  6. skruzich

    skruzich Well-Known Member

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    blight is spread whenyou water the plants. The water hits the soil and splashes up on the leaves. Fungicide will help, but not always sucessful.
    One way to handle it next year is use copper sulphate on your plants. that is organic treatment that will help prevent it.
    In the southeast its not if you get blight, its when you get blight. sometimes it hits spring, or mid summer or late summer. You don't really know when it will hit.
     
  7. Thoughthound

    Thoughthound Well-Known Member

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    Have the nights been colder than 50 degrees, or are your tomatoes planted in a low spot where cool air collects?

    When temps are below 50, the plant becomes unable to uptake nitrogen, even if there is plenty available in the soil and tomato plant leaves develop white spots or turn white at the edges.

    In most cases with cool temps, the problem is only temporary and nothing to worry about.

    Take a leaf to a garden expert to be sure.