Mastitis Question???

Discussion in 'Goats' started by tltater, May 16, 2006.

  1. tltater

    tltater Well-Known Member

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    Ok...some may have read my previous posts on milk not straining and weaning doeling by taping moms teats. So...yesterday morning I finally got some tape and taped her teats. Milked what was left after her doeling nursed and milk was fine and strained. Forgot to tell kids to milk her with everyone else last night :bash: so she went 24 hours without being milked or nursed. When I milked her this morning, one side was normal(milk that is) the other was very thick and clumpy. I am asuming this is a mild form of mastitis? She shows no other signs. Her udder is normal, not warm to the touch or anything else. She is normal. Not uncomfortable at all. I have the today infusion I can use on her. And I only do it to the one side, right? I really need to get some of the CMT tests. What is the milk with holding time when using the today? Anything else I should be doing?

    Thanks for your help!!!

    Tracy
    Southwestern ,NY
     
  2. goatmarm

    goatmarm Well-Known Member

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    I believe the withholding time is nine milkings after doing the Today infusion.
    It does sound like a mild case of mastitis. Since she is comfortable/no fever, you may be able to clear her up in a few milkings without having to use the antibiotics. Just keep milking her out completely, and massage that udder good.
    In regards to straining milk, I have found that if the milk cools too much before straining it takes much longer to pass through the filter. Try straining the milk into a container as you milk the doe. When I bring the milk container w/stainer to the milk stand and pour the warm milk in from the pail every quart or so, it filters quickly. If I wait to filter until after milking both does and bringing the milk up to the house, it can slow down the process(especially when it is cold outside).
     

  3. tltater

    tltater Well-Known Member

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    Yesterday morning and afternoon, milk was thick and clumpy on that one side. This morning, no more clumps and didn't look thick. Now my question is, how long should I wait before keeping the milk for drinking?

    Tracy
    Southwestern, NY
     
  4. TexCountryWoman

    TexCountryWoman Gig'em

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    How far along into lactation is this doe? How often have you been milking her and how much has her doeling been nursing? Is it possible that the milk was thick because the doe was trying to dry up rather than getting mastitis? Something to think about. Without a definite test, it is hard to say what is going on. My goats have never had mastitis that I have known of. If the milk looks questionable, we don't drink it and go several days until I just 'instictively" feel good about it. i don't sell milk so this is okay. Only adults drink it. Take your goats temp also. Sorry i'm not much help.
     
  5. homebirtha

    homebirtha Well-Known Member

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    If she isn't acting sick, doesn't have a temperature, udder not hot or lumpy, it doesn't sound like mastitis. It sounds like she is trying to dry up, from not being milked as often. That's how milk dries up. The liquid is reabsorbed into the body first, so it leaves the thicker, lumpier stuff, which is what you got when you milked.

    The CMT test would be a very good idea.
     
  6. tltater

    tltater Well-Known Member

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    TexCountryWoman-She is 9weeks into her lactation. When the kids were 2 weeks old, I started putting them in a stall at night and milking her in the morning. Unfortunately, I only have one "makeshift" stall in the bottom of our garage because DH hasn't built my barn yet. So, when my Nubian doe surprised us with twins, the stall was unavailable and I was unable to take them away. So, at 8weeks I pulled the buckling out and put him with my other buck, but had nowhere to put the doeling. So, I was trying to milk her even with her doeling on her....wasn't getting much, but was getting her used to being milked. Then I saw the idea of taping the teats, so tried that and that is one we found the "glue" looking milk.

    I have had one goat come to me with mastitis(chalk that up to learning) so have dealt with it before and never saw the milk look like this.

    I have one more question. This is the first time I have personally saw her in milk. Before getting PG she just had her teats tight up against her but not as if she had never had kids. Now, even after I milk all I can get out of her, her udder still looks a decent size. Is she holding back somehow? Is there anyway to get her to let that milk down?

    Thanks for everyones help in this....always learning!!!

    Tracy
    Southwestern, NY
     
  7. TexCountryWoman

    TexCountryWoman Gig'em

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    There ia a natural "let down" reflex that you can see and feel. In many cases, the goat will slightly squat with her udder towards the kids, or bucket, and you can feel the udder almost fill a bit with milk as the hormone oxitocin rushes through the body. If there is a rush of adrenaline, it will stop this reflex. A goat has to be relaxed to let down her milk. So if the goat is nervous, she will not let down her milk. Also, what kind of diet is she on? Goats need calcium to make milk and calcium is found in alfalfa. I feed free choice alfalfa pellets, all they can eat..it is kept in their feeders at all times, as the alfalfa hay here in texas is pitiful. So here in texas we use the pellets instead. If you are just feeding grain or a feed with not much calcium, she will not be able to make milk. Alfalfa pellets is all my kids get too.

    I am milking a doe now with her kids left on 24 hours a day and she too is 9 weeks into lactation. I am milking her twice a day to keep milk production up. I will switch to once a day eventually and she will not dry up. I will milk once a day til late this fall after she is bred and I get tired. Yes, your doe may be holding milk up to save it for her kids. My doe is doing it now. I know her udder very well, this is the third year i have milked her, and i know that her udder usually is all wrinkled and empty when i am through milking, and now it is not...I think she wants to save some back for her kids. It is not hard or lumpy, but I can tell that no matter what, there is still some left and I am an experienced milker. They will be weaned as soon as I get a pen for them, or they will be butchered ASAP (two wethers). She had a set of triplets and we are bottle feeding her doeling so she does not have to compete with her brother wethers.

    Keep milking you doe on a regular basis with the same routine every day. Don't let her dry up, just keep plugging away at the milking. If you are gonna add some alfalfa pellets, do it slowly as feeding changes should never be rapid with goats. See if that helps. If you already feed alfalfa hay/pellets, then just keep milking in a calm and consistent manner. give yourself and your goat time to get into a routine. i do not tape teats on a doe I am milking. I dip the teats in a mild bleach water after milking to stop germs from getting into the orifices to prevent mastitis from occuring as the doe may go lay in the dirt aftwer her bag is empty and germs can get into the freshly milked orifices (wholes you just squirted milk out of). hang in there.
     
  8. tltater

    tltater Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for all your help TexCountryWoman. The milk is fine now. Getting more and more everyday and her udder is definately softening up alot more when I milk. She never seems upset in any way when I milk her. She moves her leg out while I'm milking and stands still. They all get grain and alfalfa pellets on the stand. I can't find any one that sells alfalfa hay in this area and besides, they waste alot of hay anyway, so this way no waste.

    Thanks again!

    Tracy
    Southwestern, NY