mastitis in my jersey???

Discussion in 'Cattle' started by dairy queen, Jan 15, 2005.

  1. dairy queen

    dairy queen Member

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    My cow calved 1 month ago & has been great & healthy with both her bull calf & me milking on her. Yesterday she was very ancy when I (I hand milk!) milked her on her back quarter and tonight was VERY tender when I did the same. Her bag is soft but very swollen so I know she wasn't letting her baby suck that side today for SOME REASON. I did not feel any hardness but it was slightly warmer than normal. Her temp was about 102.5 to 103 F (it is cold in the barn & I had to take a sec to red the thermometer by lantern-light so I may have lost a point or 2 in the interim). She is doing normal on her feed and water and looks otherwise sound.
    It is Sat night so I can't get any antibiotics into her til Monday & my vet is out of reach. Any suggestions??????
    Thanks a mill
     
  2. myersfarm

    myersfarm Dariy Calf Raiser

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    you said you milked her did you get any real thick milk out of cow on any teet??? thick milk will look like it yellow and real hard to milk out will come out in little stings also it will stop up hole in teet...temp of 103 is normal so check again you can email me at kze142124@yahoo if i can help i have jersey's
     

  3. petefarms

    petefarms Well-Known Member

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    asprin over the counter type may help out, you can buy asprin bolus at your feed store or tractor supply. I once saved a holstein calf with st. josephs baby asprin, gave her 12 of them, she was a week old and had bought her at an auction saturday, and sunday night she was rolling over on her side, probably from the shipping, but shes a healthy 1st calf heiffer now. my vet has recommended asprin bolus when a cow in his dairy has a fever, maybe the start of mastitis.
     
  4. pygmywombat

    pygmywombat Well-Known Member

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    It sounds like a very early case. Just milk more often and massage gently until the udder is back to normal. A nursing calf also will help a lot.

    Claire
     
  5. dairy queen

    dairy queen Member

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    I do have a calf on her-- he is with her all the time and I milk her on one side once a day. It has been working great for the past month since she calved. Her calf sucks on all 4 quarters and I milk her right 2 after we get home in the afternoons. Some days I don't get as much milk but it works for my very busy schedule. I did this with her last freshening also. She never has had mastitis before.
    If it turns out that she does get a full-blown case, I will re-evaluate my milking schedule...
    I will really milk her out extra well today & keep tabs on her.
     
  6. dairy queen

    dairy queen Member

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    The milk was perfect in color, constistency and odor. I know what to look for with an infection because I raise dairy goats, also.
    Weird, huh?
     
  7. largeanivet

    largeanivet Member

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    The temp of 103 is not normal.. That cow has the start of mastitis. that tit that is large needs to be drained ASAP. Strip it out or put an infusing tube in the teat then let the milk flow if it stops then try to strip it out with the tube in it. If still no milk take the tube out and strip more. Then put A NEW tube in CLEAN. let it drain until it slows down DO NOT milk the tit dry. leave some clean milk in the quarter if the milk is clear,brownish and very thin like water this is the start of coliform mastitas and also if the quarter is purple she needs to be put on antibiotics fast. A cow temp should be 101.4 that is norm not 103 that is a temp unless its 90 out side. Any questions feel free to ask.. Thanks Scott DVM..
     
  8. dosthouhavemilk

    dosthouhavemilk Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Please do not use a tube unless you are forced to...we resort to tubes only if they would die otherwise...you can introduce so much bacteria into the teat canal even if you are extremely sanitary aout it.
    Kill'em or Cure'em is when we resort to putting a tube in their teats.
     
  9. largeanivet

    largeanivet Member

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    This is not true at all unless there is air in the teat in witch case there is a real problem to start with like coliform or ecoli mastitis andi n that case that the milk ducts has started to swell with bacteria and is causeing the build up of air do to the fact that the teat is cloged with mastitas and can not let the air or the infection out... This caused bye "in plain words" roting milk in this cow. you have to take it out. Strip it or tube it do what ever but the bottom line is that cow is sick it needs to be fixed. that quarter must be reduced in pressure the faster the better or let it go and keep on striping it out. And another thing the only thing your letting into that teat is the air you breath or the bactera on your hands the teat or the tube you MUST SCRUB before you do this or any other procedure..

    And let me ask to the person that said this is a KILL'em or Cure'em procedure...

    When your vet does a "DA" at your farm and pulls the guts out of a cow in plain site to tack the DA Do you incase the barn in steril plastic spray down with lysol? I just wanted to know?? Because doing major surgary is just a little more advanced in the form of being sterial. Than putting an infuser in a teat.. The thin is be clean about it. If not your going to have a problem that you may not be able to fix. I have been a large animal vet for several years and went to the U of PENN. And the one thing that i have found out is that the farmers know it all.. And i have a farm 1100 head holstein closed herd. Also i have a dog and a cat and when there sick i take it to a small animal vet. I dont know if this person is a vet. I don't think so. But there is an old saying with vets "When your doing something wrong for years you think its rite"

    Thanks Scott hope it works out for you what ever you do.You can still Email me with any questions.. Or just spend the money and get your vet to take a look...
     
  10. dosthouhavemilk

    dosthouhavemilk Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Of course keeping the quarter stripped out is the best and every four hours is better to get rid of the bacteria before it can mutiply but you were suggesting she stick a foreign object into a teat when the quarter wasn't even clumpy yet. Did you read what she wrote? The quarter was squishy and warm with no clumps yet, nowhere near when someone needs to go sticking foreign objects into the teat canal. What she said would indicate that the teat end is not plugged, so there is no need for a dilator.
    And aparently you misread what I wrote as well. I said we use the the tubes as last resorts. We prefer to deal with mastitis in better ways like keeping the quarter milked out. Very rarely will we resort to using those dilators we have in a box above the door because it is not a normal thing to be sticking in a cow's teat. You can be as sanitary as you like but there are germs in the air and you simply cannot sterilize it to be as sterile as the inside of a cow's udder naturally is. You are going to introduce bacteria into the udder anytime you stick a foreign object there, just like anytime you assist a delivery or preform surgery you will be introducing bacteria regardless of how sterile you try to make the field. As for twisted stomachs, we have had two on our farm. The first one was our vet's first time and it took him 45 minutes, the second time a new vet did it in less than 15 minutes. They were quite careful about clean equipment but anytime you open an animal up or put foreign objects in her you introduce her outside bacteria and risk infection. That is why surgery is such a big deal.
    The Kill'em or Cure'em was what we view resorting to dilators as. It means every other option has been exhausted and she has not improved, so we resort to putting a foreign object in her teat canal. In some cases it saves them and in some it kills them. We are quite careful with how things are administered but you simply cannot sterilize the environment completely and you will always be introducing foreign bacteria when you place foreign objects where they do not belong.


    No, I am not a vet and would never claim to be. I am, however, a farmer and farming has been in my family for years. We very rarely have our local vet out for emergencies, as they are treated by us. My father is very knowledgeable in treating animals because he has spent every visti from the vet learning and asking questions. Schooling and a degree aren't requirements for knowledge.

    My apologies if I come across with a snotty attitude, but you weren't exactly cordial in your response.
     
  11. largeanivet

    largeanivet Member

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    Ok look i just read what you said and your the one who needs to read.. who said anything about a dilator I SAID AN INFUSER.. Also are you saying that there is no clumps in the teat there is no mastitas coliform is like water if the end of the teat is blocked and your not getting anything out it could be 50 reasons not just clumps of mastitas You tell your vet to give me a call or you can. ill Email you with the NO## Is that ok?? Just let me know..
    Thanks Scott
     
  12. dosthouhavemilk

    dosthouhavemilk Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Infusor as in antibiotics tube? The only thing I know of that would drain a teat is a dilator, so my bad if I misunderstood what you were referring to.

    The cow is not ours and from what the owner has posted there were no clumps simply a warm swollen udder. The milk was normal color, odor and texture when she milked it. I was simply going by what she was saying and what she was noticing was a change in the udder. Which is great that it was noticed so quickly. Means they are in tune with their cow. I balk at resorting to antibiotics nowadays. When we treated cows with anitbiotics they cleared up as quickly as if we treated them without so it seemed pointlyess to shoot them up with anitbiotics. However, when the toxic mastits swept through we used the antibiotics to save that group fo cows and that made sense.
    When we need advice on our animals we ask the vet who has worked on our herd and with my father for his entire practice. He trusts us to do what we need to and knows my father is quite capable of doing most of what Fred can do.
     
  13. largeanivet

    largeanivet Member

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    Ok thanks good luck to you. But this turned out to say one thing this preson should call a vet.. Thanks
     
  14. jerzeygurl

    jerzeygurl woolgathering

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    Yes hand milk her out by all means and conttinue to do so on a more regular basis. If your gonna milk once a day from what ive read, and my father in law a previous dairy man also, you need to milk all quarters dry, the infusers and drainers are both last resorts a sysemic injectable is preferable to infusers, as you dont want to introduce more bacteria as the other poster stated.there are great dairy safe antibiotics with no withdrawall but they cost more, or you can get the other and feed the milk to the animals wont hurt them or the calf. But the sooner this is arrested the better one runs the risk of losing a quarter or even a cow. as for stripping her out, it is recomended, not stripping her is what could have caused this. goats dont get stripped out in milking, but cows MUST. Its a pain, but its gotta be done. one more thing, does she maybe have a cut on the teat, that will make them very uncomfortable. calves are very vicous and do a lot of damage especially when they know they are competeing for momas milk i know from experience. we had to turn to bottleing the calf to milk mamma . and she is just now healing. Its just a better milking experience all arround if there are no cuts or scabs on teats. I know its alot more work trust me i know, but its lot less trouble if that makes scence lol