masonry fireplace/heater/stove

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by newengland, Dec 28, 2004.

  1. newengland

    newengland Active Member

    Messages:
    40
    Joined:
    Dec 21, 2004
  2. Anataq

    Anataq Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    103
    Joined:
    Jun 19, 2004
    They are amazing. Very, very efficient. Our building plans have been designed with one in mind. We will be building it in 2006. Best used in true northern climates, because the heat does not stop radiating for long, long after the flame has gone out.

    -Anataq
     

  3. newengland

    newengland Active Member

    Messages:
    40
    Joined:
    Dec 21, 2004
    Wonderful! Best wishes on your building. I have a few questions:
    What will the square footage of your house be?
    Single, or two story?
    If two story, open concept to upper floor? or located near stairwell? or?
    Will you be building this yourself, or contracting out?
     
  4. Anataq

    Anataq Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    103
    Joined:
    Jun 19, 2004
    Square footage is approximately 2000 if you include the mud room. If you look on my web site under construction and then floor plan you can see the downstairs plan which shows the location of the mansonry heater. The room with the masonry heater is more or less open to the kitchen and dining room, it is also clear story or open to the ceiling. The upstairs has two bedroom and a bath located directly about the downstairs bedroom and bath, this way the heat rising up will warm the upstairs nicely. We are building everything ourself, piece by piece. Draft is very important from what I understand about masonry heaters, the chimeney needs to rise a ways up above the roof line. We are building ourself, but we certainly don't expect the process to be easy. Masonry heaters are quite complex, add to it that we will be building using raw stone, and not brick and it's even more difficult. Ours might not look perfect, but we'll get it built stone by stone. Also our wood burning cook stove will back up to the masonry heater and will be piped at an angle into the chimeny of the heater.

    -Anataq
    www.pawcreekhomestead.com
     
  5. ox

    ox Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    63
    Joined:
    Sep 18, 2004
    Location:
    Oregon
    It's all we've used for the last 25 years. We have built two of them and really can not say enough good about them. Here's our present

    furnace.

    Scroll down the page.

    Here is the URL for a CD we produced with plans and instructions etc.

    Singing Falls Masonry Furnace CD

    Our first model was stone/concrete and 12 walls for the Montana Winter
    The top picture on this page -

    furnaces

    You won't regret building if you do it right.!
     
  6. newengland

    newengland Active Member

    Messages:
    40
    Joined:
    Dec 21, 2004
    Anataq and Ox, thank you for the links to your sites (we've added them to our favorites). I wonder why masonry fireplaces are not used more?

    Anyone else use these for heating or cooking? I am very interested in the ones that include cook stoves; or even just a bread oven.
     
  7. ox

    ox Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    63
    Joined:
    Sep 18, 2004
    Location:
    Oregon
    Actually I was inspired to build our first one by an old mother earth news article. We lived off the grid in NW Montana in Flathead County. The county extension agent built one into his double envelope 2100 square foot home. He was a great help.

    We built the following structure with the furnace smack dab in the middle of the first floor. Here's a couple of URLs to view.

    old and new furnace shots with a typical Bellarus furnace also

    the old homestead log home

    Our home was two stories, non open to the upstairs. I placed the damper for the furnace at the peak of the chimney upstairs so the chimney was radiant also.

    We know of several folks in Oregon here who have these furnaces. One is located in the middle of a local masonry supply store! for all to see.

    Efficiency? While building the log home we lived in a 16 X 32 frame buiding with 6 inch insulated walls. I burned 10 chord of wood each year. Once we were in the 1800 square foot log home we burned 3 chords of wood per year. BIG difference.
     
  8. Anataq

    Anataq Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    103
    Joined:
    Jun 19, 2004
    Ox,
    I'd love to see more pictures of your old log home, the building process specifically, this might be a distinct possibility for us. We had pretty much planned on using SIP panels to build with because of our shorter length logs. But your piece on piece, short log work may be another alternative. Did you have a lot of timber framing experience before you started out?

    -Anataq
     
  9. ox

    ox Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    63
    Joined:
    Sep 18, 2004
    Location:
    Oregon
    0 experience.
    Of course, like anything else, as you progress, you get better at it. We used lodge pole pine and it worked great. Another one of those "can't do without" tools for us is the Alaska Chain Saw Mill. We used it extensively.
    Being off the grid and thirty years old I skid the 12'6" logs out of the brush with human traction (mine ;>) ) most of the time. I'd use the truck on occassion for the big diameter hummers. After having trained and used oxen for skidding I regret having not used them then. Things would have gone easier and faster for sure.
    I usually do a lot of reading and praying before I embark on a project. Same with the log home. It's a great way to build (short log timber framing) if you have the timbers and patience. I always overkill on structural integrity. My friends always complained that you could drive a tank on the roof. Hey! We had the timber and it looked real nice when the finish was put on. Aside from the chainsaw, all else was hand tools. The entire frame and wall timbers were done by one man. There's a book out there. I think the title is "The Short Log Timber Frame Book". Lots of good ideas.
    I've got tons of shots of the home going up but a major effort to get them web ready. Anything in particular you're interested in seeing?
     
  10. kygaloot

    kygaloot Member

    Messages:
    9
    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2004
    Location:
    KY
    Ox,

    I am a bit confused on your Montana masonry stove. Did the little woodstove (Le Petit Godin?) serve as the woodbox or is there another woodbox actually in the masonry on the back side with the woodstove acting as an additional "trimming" heat source?

    Also, did you make those interesting tiles with the embedded glacial rocks?

    Thanks,

    kygaloot
     
  11. Anataq

    Anataq Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    103
    Joined:
    Jun 19, 2004
    Ox,
    Gosh where to begin. After viewing you log home and reading the book you recommended Pam and I may be changing our plans all together and holding off on the order of our SIP panels. Piece sur Piece is nothing we'd actually considered in the past don't know why exactly, maybe the log builders we were working with we snobby about their style, don't know. Anyway, I do have some questions actuallt a bunch, but I settle for a few... your floor joists, what type of notch did you do, housed dove tail or? How about the girders? Also did you use a router to make the splines or drill and chisel, or?? I see that you squared the top log below the plate log not sure how that helped with settling? How did you cover the gap from the settling fill logs? How long were your log fill sections? Did you pin them, spike them, dowel them? Did you mill all your lumber, flooring etc, with you Alaska mill? How dry was you timber, did you build green or season? I see that yo have a post and pile foundation which is what we would be using did you completely square the sill logs for a reason? Just curious. How did you decide on a rafter style roof with verticle support, verses a truss system, or purlon? I'm guessing that you did not want to deal with the long logs required for perlons? Our plan calls for a truss system supporting the roof decking without perlons, like a rafter system except each rafter is a truss and spaced a bit farther apart I believe about six feet. Any thoughts, I am a bit intimidated about fabricating somthing like 12 trusses, though I suppose after building a couple I would gain confidence. Ok I'll leave you with those questions, I have to many more. Love to see picutres of you roof notches, close ups of you joist joinery and anything else you 'd like to share.

    Can't thank you enough for recommending that style of building, we'd just about given up the idea of a log home, for fear we could move the logs easy enough, or lift fifty footers into the air like our original plan called for

    Thanks agian,
    Anataq