maple syrup filter?

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by Matt NY, Feb 23, 2005.

  1. Matt NY

    Matt NY Well-Known Member

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    What should I use to filter maple syrup? I tried a coffe filter and it won't go through. Cheese cloth doesn't get the sand out. I have read that production filters are wool felt or orlon.

    What do you use?
     
  2. fin29

    fin29 Well-Known Member

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    Try a flannel shirt or pillowcase.
     

  3. Rita

    Rita Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I found that a good-quality paper towel worked well. Rita
     
  4. RedneckPete

    RedneckPete Well-Known Member

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    Get a large square of felt and clip it to the top of a five gallon pail with new clothes-pins.

    Pete
     
  5. tallpines

    tallpines Well-Known Member

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    An old white T-shirt
     
  6. tltater

    tltater Well-Known Member

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    We use cheese cloth or coffee filters when we jar it. But when we boil it down (the final stage when it's almost ready to be pulled off) we beat a bunch of raw eggs and put them in the syrup while it is boiling. The sugar sand and anything else that may be in there sticks to the eggs and using a slotted spoon,comes out with them too!
     
  7. Rita

    Rita Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I wanted to add to my post about using paper towels. I should have added that we put the paper towel in one of those wire mesh kitchen strainers to support the towel and toss the towel and replace when it gets clogged. Rita
     
  8. Helena

    Helena Well-Known Member

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    I would also go with the strainer or colander idea from the kitchen. Why do you have "sand" in your syrup. The most we have is the ashes from the fire. At times I just have strained it through a regular strainer that I use for canning. The old T-shirt idea will work great too. Where in NY are you doing syrup now. Here in Pa the weather seems to be too unpredictable. We use to do a lot of syrup just for ouselves but now no one seems to be around to help me lug the buckets by hand down the hill to the barn. Seems like the grandchildren were more help when they were small..??? All like to tend the fire and eat the syrup and make hot dogs around the fire. Where have I failed !!! The sand has me wondering though ??
     
  9. RedneckPete

    RedneckPete Well-Known Member

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    I get the "sand" too. I think it is actually minerals that precipitate out of the sap as it is boiled down. I think the boiling drives off the water and so the minerals are concentrated to the point that they form tiny crystals and settle out of the syrup.

    A piece of felt works great to seperate these out. A coffee filter will work, but only for very small amounts. It would take forever to put 10 gallons of syrup through a coffee filter.

    Pete
     
  10. diane

    diane Well-Known Member

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    I have one of those milk filter things that I put a double thickness of butter muslin in and filter through that. I filter once when we bring the sap in before we evaporate and once when we jar it. We keep saying we are going to order one of the felt filters, but what we are doing is working fine.
     
  11. EricG

    EricG Well-Known Member

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    We always used a paper prefilter on top of a felt filter, either cone style or flat depending on the filter tank we were using. The large flat ones were supported by a metal mesh. The cones didn't need extra support. Cones seemed to work best for us. Of course the syrup has to be hot or it wont go thru.

    Eric
     
  12. manygoatsnmore

    manygoatsnmore Well-Known Member Supporter

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    What about a milk filter? It's a lot more porous that a coffer filter, and I've used them to filter more than just milk. Never used them on maple syrup, since we don't live in the right area of the country for that :)
     
  13. timberweed

    timberweed Active Member

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    The sand-like stuff in unstrained syrup is called niter and its mostly the mineral potassium nitrate, a natural residue of boiling sap.